Santa Clara University

Graduate School of Engineering

Department of Mechanical Engineering

Professors Emeriti: Mark D. Ardema, R. Ian Murray, Michel A. Saad
Professors: M. Godfrey Mungal, Terry E. Shoup
Associate Professors: Drazen Fabris (Chair), Timothy K. Hight, Christopher Kitts
Assistant Professors: Mohammed Ayoubi, Hohyun Lee, Panthea Sepehrband

OVERVIEW

The Department of Mechanical Engineering is dedicated to delivering up-to-date, high-quality courses across a broad range of the discipline to meet the needs of both part- and full-time graduate students. These courses are concentrated in five technical areas: (1) design and analysis of thermofluid systems; (2) analysis and control of dynamic systems; (3) robotics and mechatronic systems; (4) mechanical design; and (5) materials engineering. In addition students interested in space systems are referred to the Lockheed Martin-Santa Clara University program in Chapter 17. Educational efforts are channeled to expand the skills of prospective and practicing engineers not only in understanding fundamentals, but also in developing competence in analyzing engineering systems. The department offers graduate degrees at the master, engineer, and doctorate levels, as well as certificates.

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAMS

All students in the M.S. Mechanical Engineering Program are required to take MECH 200 (2 units) and MECH 201(2 units), or MECH 202 (4 units) at the beginning of their program of studies and must complete at least one sequence of two courses in applied mathematics or an equivalent four unit course. All students must also satisfy the requirements of the graduate core (details may be found in the admissions section).

Students must select one of the five options and develop a program of studies with an advisor (names of faculty available under each option are listed after the program title). The requirements for all options may be adjusted on the basis of the student’s previous work; however, any adjustment must be approved by the departmental advisor.

All full-time students are required to complete a thesis or Capstone project (Materials, Mechanical Design, or Robotics and Mechatronic Systems) for their degree.

Dynamics and Controls
Advisor: Dr. Mohammed Ayoubi, Dr. Chris Kitts

Required Courses

  • AMTH 210, 211 Discrete and Continuous Probability or AMTH 212 (4 units)
  • AMTH 245, 246 Linear Algebra I, II or AMTH 247 (4 units)
  • MECH 214, 215 Advanced Dynamics I, II (4 units)
  • MECH 305, 306 Advanced Vibrations I, II (4 units)
  • MECH 323, 324 Modern Control Systems I, II (4 units)

Elective Courses (10 units required)

  • MECH 205, 206 Aircraft Flight Dynamics I, II (4 units)
  • MECH 221, 222 Orbital Mechanics I, II (4 units)
  • MECH 299 Thesis (4-10 units)
  • MECH 329 Introduction to Intelligent Control (2 units)
  • MECH 337, 338 Robotics I, II (4 units)
  • MECH 355, 356 Adaptive Control I, II (4 units)
  • MECH 429 and 430 Optimal Control I and II (4 units)
  • MECH 431 and 432 Spacecraft Dynamics I, II (4 units)

Materials Engineering

Advisor: Dr. Panthea Sepehrband

Required Courses

  • MECH 256 Introduction to Biomaterials (2 units)
  • MECH 281 Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue (2 units)
  • MECH 299 Thesis or 290 Capstone Project
  • MECH 330 Atomic Arrangement, Defects, and Mechanical Behavior (2 units)
  • MECH 331 Phase Equilibria and Transformations (2 units)
  • MECH 332 Electronic Structure and Properties (2 units)
  • MECH 333 Experiments in Materials Science (2 units)
  • MECH 334 Elasticity (2 units)
  • MECH 345 Modern Instrumentation and Experimentation (2 units)

Recommended Courses

  • AMTH 210 Introduction to Probability I and
    AMTH 211 Continuous Probability (2 units )
  • AMTH 217 Design of Scientific Experiments (2 units) and
    AMTH 219 Analysis of Scientific Experiments (2 units )
  • AMTH 218 Process Troubleshooting and Control (2 units)
  • CENG 205, 206, and 207 Finite Element Methods I, II, and III (2 units each)
  • CENG 211 Advanced Strength of Materials (4 units)
  • ELEN 271 Microsensors: Components and Systems (2 units)
  • ELEN 274 and 275 Integrated Circuit Fabrication Processes I and II (2 units each)
  • ELEN 276 Integrated Circuits Devices and Technology (2 units)
  • ELEN 277 IC Assembly and Packaging Technology (2 units)
  • ELEN 390 Semiconductor Device Technology Reliability (2 units)
  • MECH 273 Designing with Plastic Materials (2 units)
  • MECH 274 Processing Plastic Materials (2 units)
  • MECH 277 Injection Mold Tool Design (2 units)
  • MECH 350 and 351 Composite Materials I and II (2 units each)

Mechanical Design
Advisors: Dr. Tim Hight, Dr. Terry Shoup

Required Courses

  • CENG 205, 206, and 207 Finite Element Methods I, II, and III (2 units each)
  • MECH 275 Design for Competitiveness (2 units)
  • MECH 285 Computer-Aided Design of Mechanisms (2 units)
  • MECH 325 Computational Geometry for Computer-Aided Design and Manufacture (2 units)
  • MECH 334 Elasticity (2 units)
  • MECH 415 Optimization in Mechanical Design (2 units)

Recommended Courses

  • MECH 207, 208, and 209 Advanced Mechatronics I, II, and III (2 units each)
  • MECH 273 and 274 Designing with Plastic Materials and Processing Plastic Materials (2 units each)
  • MECH 281 Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue I (2 units)
  • MECH 330 Atomic Arrangement, Defects, and Mechanical Behavior (2 units)
  • MECH 331 Phase Equilibria and Transformations (2 units)
  • MECH 332 Electronic Structure and Properties (2 units)
  • MECH 371 and 372 Space Systems Design and Engineering I and II (4 units each)

Robotics and Mechatronic Systems
Advisor: Dr. Chris Kitts

Required Courses

  • MECH 207, 208, and 209 Advanced Mechatronics I, II, III (3 units each)
  • MECH 299 Thesis (1-9 units) or 290 Capstone Project (2-6 units)
  • MECH 337 and 338 Robotics I, II (2 units each)

The student must also choose one of the following two-course sequences:

  • MECH 218 and 219 Guidance and Control I, II (2 units each)
  • MECH 323 and 324 Modern Control System I, II (2 units each)

Elective Courses (8 units required)

  • MECH 209 Advanced Mechatronics III (2 units)
  • MECH 218 Guidance and Control I (2 units)
  • MECH 219 Guidance and Control II (2 units)
  • MECH 275 Design for Competitiveness (2 units)
  • MECH 311 Modeling and Control of Telerobotic Systems (4 units)
  • MECH 315 Advanced Digital Control Systems I (2 units)
  • MECH 316 Advanced Digital Control Systems II (2 units)
  • MECH 323 Modern Control System Design I (2 units)
  • MECH 324 Modern Control System Design II (2 units)
  • MECH 329 Introduction to Intelligent Control (2 units)
  • MECH 339 Robotics III (2 units)
  • MECH 345 Modern Instrumentation and Experimentation (2 units)

Thermofluids
Advisors: Dr. Drazen Fabris, Dr. Hohyun Lee

Required Courses

  • MECH 228 Equilibrium Thermodynamics (2 units)
  • MECH 236 Conduction Heat Transfer (2 units)
  • MECH 238 Convective Heat and Mass Transfer I (2 units)
  • MECH 240 Radiation Heat Transfer I (2 units)
  • MECH 266 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (2 units)
  • MECH 270 Viscous Flow I (2 units)

Elective Courses (8 units required)

  • MECH 225 Gas Dynamics I (2 units)
  • MECH 226 Gas Dynamics II (2 units)
  • MECH 230 Statistical Thermodynamics (2 units)
  • MECH 239 Convective Heat and Mass Transfer II (2 units)
  • MECH 241 Radiation Heat Transfer II (2 units)
  • MECH 268 Computational Fluid Dynamics I (2 units)
  • MECH 269 Computational Fluid Dynamics II (2 units)
  • MECH 271 Viscous Flow II (2 units)
  • MECH 288 Energy Conversion I (2 units)
  • MECH 345 Modern Instrumentation and Control (2 units)

DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY PROGRAM

The doctor of philosophy degree is conferred by the School of Engineering in recognition of competence in the subject field and the ability to investigate engineering problems independently, resulting in a new contribution to knowledge in the field.

See the section on Academic Regulations for details on admission and general degree requirements. The following departmental information augments the general School requirements.

Academic Advisor
A temporary academic advisor will be provided to the student upon admission. The student and advisor must meet prior to registration for the second quarter to complete a preliminary program of studies, which will be determined largely by the coursework needed for the preliminary exam.

Preliminary Exam
A preliminary written exam is offered at least once per year by the School of Engineering as needed. The purpose is to ascertain the depth and breadth of the student’s preparation and suitability for Ph.D. work. Each student in mechanical engineering must take and pass an exam in mathematics, as well as in four areas from the following list Fluid Mechanics, Heat Transfer, Strength of Materials, Dynamics, Design, Controls, Vibrations, Finite Element Analysis, Material Science, and Thermodynamics. The advisor must approve the student’s petition to take the exam.

ENGINEER’S DEGREE PROGRAM

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers an engineer’s degree program. Details on admissions and requirements are shown in the Academic Regulations section. Students interested in this program should seek individual advice from the department chair prior to applying.

CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Controls
Objective
The Controls Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical and closely related fields of engineering. The certificate will provide a foundation in contemporary control theory and methods. The Controls Certificate covers classical and modern control systems and analysis. Specialization in digital control, mechatronics, robotics, or aerospace applications is possible with a suitable choice of electives. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to design and analyze modern control systems.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or a closely related field of engineering. They are expected to have prior coursework in undergraduate mathematics. No prior control courses are required.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (8 units)

  • MECH 217 Introduction to Control (2 units)
  • MECH 218 Guidance and Control I (2 units)
  • MECH 323 Modern Control Systems I (2 units)
  • MECH 324 Modern Control Systems II (2 units)

Elective Courses (8 units)

  • AMTH 245 Linear Algebra I (2 units)
  • AMTH 246 Linear Algebra II (2 units)
  • CENG 211 Advanced Strength of Materials (4 units)
  • MECH 207 Advanced Mechatronics I (2 units)
  • MECH 208 Advanced Mechatronics II (2 units)
  • MECH 209 Advanced Mechatronics III (2 units)
  • MECH 219 Guidance and Control II (2 units)
  • MECH 329 Introduction to Intelligent Control (2 units)
  • MECH 429, 430 Optimal Control I, II ( 2 units each)
  • MECH 355, 356 Adaptive Control I, II ( 2 units each)

Dynamics
Objective
The Dynamics Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical and related fields of engineering. The certificate will provide a fundamental and broad background in engineering dynamics. The Dynamics Certificate includes a strong foundational base in dynamics and applications in optimization, robotics, mechatronics, or dynamics of aircraft or spacecraft (depending on the chosen elective courses). Completion of the certificate will allow the student to formulate and solve the complex dynamics problems that arise in such fields as robotics and space flight.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or a closely related field of engineering. They are expected to have prior coursework in undergraduate dynamics and mathematics.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.e.

Required Courses

  • MECH 214, 215 Advanced Dynamics I, II ( 2 units each)
  • MECH 305, 306 Advanced Vibrations I, II ( 2 units each)

Elective Courses

  • MECH 205, 206 Aircraft Flight Dynamics I, II ( 2 units each)
  • MECH 431, 432 Spacecraft Dynamics I, II ( 2 units each)

Materials Engineering
Objective
The Materials Engineering Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical, materials, or manufacturing engineering. The certificate will provide either an upgrade in materials understanding, or advanced study in a particular aspect of the subject. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to develop a deeper understanding of materials and their applications in design and manufacturing.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or a related engineering discipline. They are expected to have prior coursework in basic materials science and strength of materials.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (12 units)

  • MECH 281 Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue (2 units)
  • MECH 330 Atomic Arrangements, Defects, and Mechanical Behavior (2 units)
  • MECH 331 Phase Equilibria and Transformations (2 units)
  • MECH 332 Electronic Structure and Properties (2 units)
  • MECH 333 Experiments in Materials Science (2 units)
  • MECH 345 Modern Instrumentation and Control (2 units)

Elective Courses (4 units)

  • AMTH 210 Introduction to Probability I and
    AMTH 211 Continuous Probability (2 units each)
  • AMTH 217 Design of Scientific Experiments and
    AMTH 219 Analysis of Scientific Experiments (2 units each)
  • CENG 211 Advanced Strength of Materials (4 units)
  • ENGR 260 Nanoscale Science and Technology (2 units)
  • ENGR 262 Nanomaterials (2 units)
  • MECH 273 Designing with Plastic Materials (2 units)
  • MECH 274 Processing Plastic Materials (2 units)
  • MECH 277 Injection Mold Tool Design (2 units)
  • MECH 334 Elasticity
  • MECH 350 and 351 Composite Materials I and II (2 units each)

Mechanical Design Analysis
Objective
The Mechanical Design Analysis Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical or structural engineering. The certificate will provide a succinct upgrade in knowledge and skills that will allow the student to gain a deeper understanding of CAD and FEA principles and practices. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to pursue more advanced design and analysis tasks.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical, civil, aerospace, or related field. They are expected to have prior coursework in strength of materials, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and mathematics through differential equations.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (12 units)

  • CENG 205 Finite Element Methods I (2 units)
  • CENG 206 Finite Element Methods II (2 units)
  • CENG 207 Finite Element Methods III (2 units)
  • MECH 325 Computational Geometry for Computer-Aided Design and Manufacture (2 units)
  • MECH 334 Elasticity
  • MECH 415 Optimization in Mechanical Design (2 units)

Elective Courses (4 units)

  • AMTH 220 Numerical Analysis I (2 units)
  • AMTH 221 Numerical Analysis II (2 units)
  • AMTH 308 Mathematical Modeling I (2 units)
  • AMTH 309 Mathematical Modeling II (2 units)
  • AMTH 370 Optimization Techniques I (2 units)
  • AMTH 371 Optimization Techniques II (2 units)
  • CENG 211 Advanced Strength of Materials (4 units)
  • CENG 214 Theory of Elasticity (4 units)
  • CENG 222 Advanced Structural Analysis (4 units)
  • MECH 268 Computational Fluid Mechanics I (2 units)
  • MECH 269 Computational Fluid Mechanics II (2 units)

Mechatronics Systems Engineering
Objective
The Mechatronics Systems Engineering Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical engineering and related fields. The certificate program introduces students to the primary technologies, analysis techniques, and implementation methodologies relevant to the detailed design of electro-mechanical devices. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to develop systems that involve the sensing, actuation and control of the physical world. Knowledge such as this is vital to engineers in the modern aerospace, robotics and motion control industries.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical, aerospace, electrical, engineering physics, or a related field. They are expected to have prior coursework in mathematics through differential equations, introductory linear control theory, and introductory electronics and programming.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (8 units)

  • MECH 207 Advanced Mechatronics I (2 units)
  • MECH 208 Advanced Mechatronics II (2 units)
  • MECH 209 Advanced Mechatronics III (2 units)
  • MECH 217 Introduction to Control (2 units)

Elective Courses (8 units)

  • MECH 218 Guidance and Control I (2 units)
  • MECH 219 Guidance and Control II (2 units)
  • MECH 275 Design for Competitiveness (2 units)
  • MECH 310 Advanced Mechatronics IV (2 units)
  • MECH 311 Modeling and Control of Telerobotic Systems (4 units)
  • MECH 315 Digital Control Systems I (2 units)
  • MECH 316 Digital Control Systems II (2 units)
  • MECH 323 Modern Control Systems I (2 units)
  • MECH 324 Modern Control Systems II (2 units)
  • MECH 329 Intelligent Control (2 units)
  • MECH 337 Robotics I (2 units)
  • MECH 338 Robotics II (2 units)
  • MECH 339 Robotics III (2 units)
  • MECH 345 Modern Instrumentation (2 units)

An independent study or Capstone project would be suitable as one of the electives. In addition, other courses may serve as electives at the discretion of the program advisor.

Thermofluids
Objective
The Thermofluids Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical, chemical, or a closely related field of engineering. The certificate will provide fundamental theoretical and analytic background, as well as exposure to modern topics and applications. Specialization in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, or heat transfer is possible with suitable choice of electives. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to design heat transfer and fluid solutions for a range of modern applications.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or a closely related field of engineering. They are expected to have prior undergraduate coursework in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and heat transfer.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (12 units)

  • MECH 228 Equilibrium Thermodynamics (2 units)
  • MECH 236 Conduction Heat Transfer (2 units)
  • MECH 238 Convective Heat Transfer I (2 units)
  • MECH 240 Radiation Heat Transfer I (2 units)
  • MECH 266 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (2 units)
  • MECH 270 Viscous Flow I (2 units)

Elective Courses (6 units)

  • MECH 202 Mathematical Methods in Mechanical Engineering (4 units)
  • MECH 226 Gas Dynamics II (2 units)
  • MECH 230 Statistical Thermodynamics (2 units)
  • MECH 236 Conduction Heat Transfer (2 units)
  • MECH 239 Convective Heat Transfer II (2 units)
  • MECH 240 Radiation Heat Transfer I (2 units)
  • MECH 268 Computational Fluid Mechanics I (2 units)
  • MECH 271 Viscous Flow II (2 units)
  • MECH 288 Energy Conversion I (2 units)
  • MECH 289 Energy Conversion II (2 units)

Technology Jump-Start Certificate
Objective
The Technology Jump-Start Certificate is particularly suitable for persons who need to complete the program in two full-time quarters in order to gain new skills and competencies quickly and to “Jump Start” their careers. This program is highly flexible and becomes a customized program for each student, developed through close consultation between the student and an academic advisor, and is subject to the particular courses available at the time. It is intended for experienced engineers in mechanical or related engineering fields. The certificate will provide a quick retooling of skills and knowledge. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to significantly upgrade competencies, and/or change career directions.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical engineering or a related field. They are expected to have prior coursework relevant to the program that has been designed for them, and mathematics through differential equations.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units of graduate coursework with at least 12 units from the Department of Mechanical Engineering and at most 4 units from the Department of Engineering Management. The coursework must be completed with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING LABORATORIES

The mechanical engineering laboratories contain facilities for instruction and research in the fields of manufacturing, materials science, fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, heat and mass transfer, combustion, instrumentation, vibration and control systems, and robotic systems.

The Robotic Systems Laboratory is an interdisciplinary laboratory specializing in the design, control, and teleoperation of highly capable robotic systems for scientific discovery, technology validation, and engineering education. Laboratory students develop and operate systems that include spacecraft, underwater robots, aircraft, and land rovers. These projects serve as ideal testbeds for learning and conducting research in mechatronic system design, guidance and navigation, command and control systems, and human-machine interfaces.

The 2009 Solar Decathlon House is highly instrumented testbed for study of photovoltaic and solar thermal systems, as well as general home control systems. Projects include development of a carbon meter, investigation of the impact of micro-invertors on performance, and control of a solar thermal driven vapor absorption chiller.

The Micro Scale Heat Transfer Laboratory (MSHTL) develops state-of-the-art experimentation in processes such as micro-boiling, spray cooling, and laser induced fluorescence thermometry. Today, trends indicate that these processes are finding interesting applications on drop-on-demand delivery systems, ink-jet technology, and fast transient systems (such as combustion or microseconds scale boiling).

The CAM and Prototyping Laboratory consists of two machine shops and a prototyping area. One machine shop is dedicated to student use for University-directed design and research projects. The second is a teaching lab used for undergraduate and graduate instruction. Both are equipped with modern machine tools, such as lathes and milling machines. The milling machines all have two-axis computer numerically controlled (CNC) capability.The teaching lab also houses both a three-axis CNC vertical milling center (VMC) and a CNC lathe. Commercial CAM software is available to aid programming of the computer controlled equipment. The prototyping area is equipped with a rapid prototyping system that utilizes fused deposition modeling (FDM) to create plastic prototypes from CAD-generated models. Also featured in this area is a Laser CAMM CNC laser cutting system for nonmetallic materials.

The Engine Laboratory contains a variety of internal combustion engines installed on dynamometer stands that can be used for studies of diesel and spark-ignition engines. The facilities include a chassis dynamometer and instrumentation for evaluating engine performance, measuring exhaust gas emissions, and measuring noise. Studies can be conducted using a variety of fuels.

The Fluid Dynamics/Thermal Science Laboratory contains equipment to illustrate the principles of fluid flow and heat transfer and to familiarize students with hydraulic machines, refrigeration cycles, and their instrumentation. The lab also contains a subsonic wind tunnel equipped with an axial flow fan with adjustable pitch blades to study aerodynamics. Research tools include modern nonintrusive flow measurement systems.

The Heat Transfer Laboratory contains equipment to describe three modes of heat transfer. The temperature measurement of the extended surface system allows students to learn steady state conduction, and the pyrometer enables measurement of emitted power by radiation. The training systems for heat exchanger and refrigeration system are also placed in the lab.

The Instrumentation Laboratory contains seven computer stations equipped with state-of-the-art, PC-based data acquisition hardware and software systems. A variety of transducers and test experiments for making mechanical, thermal, and fluid measurements are part of this lab.

The Materials Laboratory contains equipment for metallography and optical examination of the microstructure of materials as well as instruments for mechanical properties characterization including tension, compression, hardness, and impact testing. The Materials Laboratory also has a tube furnace for heat treating and a specialized bell-jar furnace for pour casting and suction casting of metallic glasses and novel alloy compositions.

TheVibrations and Control Systems Laboratory is equipped with two flexible test systems. One is capable of single or multi degree of freedom modes, free or forced motion, and adjustable damping. The other is an inverted pendulum. Both systems can be controlled by a wide variety of control algorithms and are fully computer connected for data acquisition and control.

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