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Showing obituaries submitted in the last year

1968

'68
Gary G. Ford

Gary Gene Ford ’68, former San Jose resident, died on April 25 after a long illness. Gary was the son of the late Vern Ford and Margie Ford. He is survived by Vivienne his wife of 40 years; his mother Margie; his sister Vicki (Bill); his daughter Aurora; his two sons Conan (Negar) and Nathan (Julie); his nephew Michael and his granddaughter Tara. Gary was born in Perry Iowa and moved to San Jose in 1954 with his family. He graduated with honors from James Lick High School in 1964 and Santa Clara University in 1968. He studied at the University of British Columbia earning a MS degree in mathematics and studied mechanical engineering as well. He worked in the Canadian oil and gas industry before retiring. He was an accomplished tuba player, an aspiring poet and spent his last years caring for his love birds

submitted May. 15, 2013 1:47P
'68
Claudia Borello Alexander

Dr. Claudia Borello Alexander M.A ’68, 78, of Vienna, Va., passed away  Feb. 20, 2013. She was born to the late Marco and Irene Borello, October 4, 1934, in San Jose, California. Claudia graduated with a B.A. from San Jose State University; an M.A. from Santa Clara University; and a Ph.D. from Kansas State University. She was an Associate Professor Emeritus of English at Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond, Louisiana, where she taught for 17 years. She also taught at Leigh High School in San Jose, California and Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas. While at Southeastern Louisiana University she was active in the Arts directing and acting in plays for the SLU Theater Department and the Columbia Theater Players. For the English Department she directed an annual Renaissance Banquet which was always memorable. Claudia was passionate about both Literature and Teaching. She loved introducing students to all kinds of literature and history. She defended classic literature with tireless energy. Interested in Women's Studies she received grants to present papers and give classes on the subject. She researched and edited The Quotable Woman by Elaine Partnow. Claudia's family was most important to her, she devoted her life to them. She is survived by her brother, Leonard F. Borello, of Saratoga, California; three children, Eric Alexander of Atlanta, Georgia; Ariel O'Heeron, of Orlando, Florida and Adrienne Lutz of Vienna, Virginia. She also is survived by seven grandchildren, a great-grandchild, five nieces, six nephews as well as several grand nieces and grand nephews. 

submitted May. 22, 2013 3:41A

1969

'69
Robert E. Maloney

Robert E. Maloney J.D. ’74 passed away peacefully on Nov. 19, 2013, in Grass Valley, Calif. His battle with cancer is finally over. He was surrounded in love by his family and friends.

A celebration of life will be held in the spring.
 
Bob is survived by his wife, Nina Maloney; daughter Erin Maloney; son and daughter-in-law Michael and Tricia Maloney; grandchildren Janine Petmecky, Jake Petmecky, Katelyn Maloney, Joshua Maloney; and sister Patricia Durie.
 
Bob was born July 14, 1929, in New York. After high school, he attended the U.S. Naval Academy from 1950 to the end of 1952. He earned his BSEE from University of Texas in 1957 and his MSEE Degree from University of Santa Clara, Calif. in 1969.
 
Bob worked as an engineer until 1974 in Mountain View, Calif., when he earned his Juris Doctor from University of Santa Clara and started his own law practice, specializing in family law, immigration and small business. Education was a true passion for Bob.
 
In July 1960, Bob traveled overseas and met the love of his life in Denmark, as he so many times said he brought back his “Great Dane.” Bob and Nina were married Dec. 31, 1960 and spent 53 years together and enjoyed many wonderful adventures and experiences in that time, not to mention a few golf games and even more bridge.
 
Bob’s greatest sense of joy and pride was his family and friends; he will be missed by so many. Bob will be remembered for his jokes and friendly attitude. He loved reading, crossword puzzles and Sudokos. Bob was a true optimist and was a member of the De Anza Optimist Club for many years.
 
submitted Dec. 3, 2013 11:23A
UGRD Arts & Sciences '69
Mary C. Kornei

Mary Catherine Kornei ’69 was a doctor who still made house calls. She cared deeply about her patients, visiting them on weekends and sleeping lightly so that she could be there for them at a moment's notice. Dr. Kornei, a longtime Los Altos resident and South Bay native, died April 30 of complications from lymphoma. She was 65. Dr. Kornei's family, friends and colleagues described her as a positive soul with an affinity for the outdoors, talented and passionate across a range of activities. She hiked regularly spoke French fluently loved her cats enjoyed cooking, sewing, reading, gardening, and according to husband Tom, even hanging clothes outside on the line to dry. She was often seen bicycling in her white lab coat to and from her office near El Camino Hospital. The daughter of Elizabeth and Dr. Vernon Schulein, a medical internist, Dr. Kornei grew up with her brother, John, in Willow Glen. She took ballet and piano lessons, participated in Girl Scouts and enjoyed hikes in the woods with her family. She attended Sacred Heart High School in Menlo Park and completed her undergraduate work in English and French at Santa Clara University in 1969. She lived in Aix-en-Provence, France, for two years after college and kept her French-language skills current. Dr. Kornei joined a Sierra Club bicycle trip along the Feather River in Northern California in 1973. On that trip, she met Tom Kornei, an electrical engineer who owned a small computer hardware company in Cupertino. The couple began dating before she enrolled at Yale Medical School in 1976. They were married at Stanford Memorial Church in July 1977 and moved to Los Altos. Dr. Kornei completed her medical residency at Stanford University in 1980 and began working in the Cupertino Clinic. The Korneis welcomed their first child, Katherine, in 1984. Dr. Kornei opened a private practice on Hospital Drive near El Camino Hospital in 1985. A second child, Mark, joined the family in 1988. Dr. Kornei was often on call. She wanted her patients to receive the best care and always made time for them. Even as a regular attendee sitting in one of the front pews at Los Altos United Methodist Church, she often quietly slipped out to answer a vibrating call from her answering service. Dr. Kornei worked at her private practice until her retirement in 2009. She was passionate in her love for medicine beyond any economic ramifications, Tom said, recounting how his wife called patients in the evening at home to share lab results and provided many services pro bono. She biked to work with side baskets containing medical charts. Dr. Kornei's friends and patients knew her as a caring, positive person with a beautiful smile. She sent thank-you notes for even the smallest kindnesses. Her son, Mark, said dinners at 8 p.m. were commonplace growing up, because that's when mom finished caring for her patients. He remembers as a child hauling around mailing tubs full of files in hospital corridors, trailing his mom as she made rounds. Patient care wasn't a job it was a passion, but so was bread baking, travel and everything else she did in a life that was lived to the fullest. That passion rubbed off on my sister and myself, Mark said. Dr. Kornei's daughter, Katherine, recalled important lessons learned from mom—the thrill of growing vegetables in the garden, the joy of travel and not being afraid of trying new experiences. I loved watching her test her language skills and pick up a guide book to explore a foreign city, she said. I remember wandering around the backroads of Venice with her and going into a glass-blowing shop on the island of Murano to view an artist at work. Longtime friend and colleague Dr. Cesar Molina called Dr. Kornei a very courageous person who took life's challenges head on and approached death the same way. He said he received an email from her about visiting one last time before her journey so she could say goodbye. Dr. Kornei is survived by husband Tom, daughter Katherine, son Mark, mother Elizabeth Schulein, brother John Schulein, nephew Greg Schulein and niece Michelle Parsons. 

submitted Jul. 19, 2013 5:24P
'69
Mary C. Covello

Mary C. Covello M.A. '69, longtime resident of San Jose, entered into rest on March 7, 2014 at age 94. Mary was born in Renovo, Pennsylvania to Anna and Frank Corica. Her family moved to California in 1937 following the premature death of her father. She attended Notre Dame high school and San Jose Normal School for Teachers (now San Jose State) and graduated with a teaching credential. She began her career as an elementary school teacher in the Jefferson Union school district. Her talents garnered her a job in the central administrative office of Santa Clara Unified school district where she was a named one of the first female vice principals in the district. Mary earned her Master's degree in Counseling and Guidance from Santa Clara University in 1969. Her 33 year career in school administration as principal of Westwood Elementary in Santa Clara and then John Braly School in Sunnyvale earned her much love and praise from educators, teachers and parents. Mary was preceded in death by her husband of 47 years Angelo Covello. Together they had three children, Dennis, of San Jose; David (Debi) of Pleasanton, CA and Valory, of Mesa, Arizona. She leaves behind two grandchildren, Dominic and Daniel Covello. Mary will be remembered as a caring and devoted daughter, wife, mother, aunt, great aunt and cherished grandmother. Her many gifts set an example of how to life each day to the fullest. She was loved and admired by all whom came to know her. 

submitted Apr. 7, 2014 5:20P
'69
Laurence E. Daniels

Laurence Edward Daniels ’69 was killed on Oct. 19, 2013. doing one of the things he loved most. He was a problem solver, an engineer who dedicated his work life to making rail travel more efficient and safe. He was born in Pasadena California on October 15, 1947. He grew up with his parents, Victor and Gertrude and his sister Marie Therese in Sierra Madre. He received his Bachelors in Mechanical Engineering from Santa Clara University. He married Joyce A. (Reynolds) Daniels ’69 while finishing his degree and had two daughters, Sarah and Amber Daniels. He was immediately employed by the railroad industry to inspect track, starting with the Western Pacific in the East Bay.

He and his family moved across the US so he could work for various rail inspection projects. They lived in Boisie Idaho, Pueblo Colorado and Fairfax Virginia, before returning to California in 1993. In each community, Larry made an impact. He coached and played soccer, played Rugby, golfed, and always had an active workshop in the garage. He was particularly enamored of creating and building things in his workshop, from amazing trellises for his gardens, to renovating the houses where he lived. He rarely sat still, unless it was to read a good book. He was an avid reader of biographies and historical information. He was always looking to figure out how things and people were put together.
 
After he returned to California, he started his own consulting firm, Daniels Railroad Engineering. He worked on rail projects all over the US and the world, helping improve and grow rail systems. Included in his projects were the English Channel Tunnel, the Kowloon-Canton Railway in China and the Singapore Mass Transit Project. He was a pioneer in many areas of the rail industry, most especially maglev rail projects. He also served on the Board of El Dorado and Sacramento Railway Historical Society and helped preserve and implement historical rail projects in the Sacramento Valley.
 
In 1996 he and his wife separated and in 2006 he met his second love, Betty Keever. Betty and Larry were together until the time of his death. He and Betty moved to Oakland in 2011 with their snuggly dog Oliver. He and Betty traveled widely, exploring the country and laughing often. Larry was Betty’s “Number 1”. Larry also played golf and played in semi-pro tournaments.
 
Larry was an incredibly generous man, who was described by many close to him as “wonderful, kind and extremely supportive”. He worked hard at whatever he did and loved to share the knowledge he had acquired. He cared deeply for the people in his life and would go out of his way to plan adventures for loved ones. His family speaks animatedly of a Segway trip last Thanksgiving around Lake Merrit that Larry planned, of how much fun they had, the stories they told. Larry always planned these excursions and field trips meticulously, ensuring that every possible activity was included and that the weather conditions would be perfect. He enjoyed making others happy and doing things for others wherever he could. He would often insist that people treat themselves on his dime.
 
Larry is survived by his life partner, Betty , his sister Marie -Therese, his daughters Amber and Sarah, nephews Eric and Marck and his dog Oliver. 
submitted Nov. 22, 2013 12:06P

1970

'70
Thomas W. Cain

For more than two decades, Judge Thomas W. Cain '70, J.D. '73 stayed one step ahead of cancer as the disease ravaged his body, all while overseeing some of Silicon Valley's most colorful estate cases. But after 27 surgeries and multiple rounds of chemotherapy and radiation, the popular Santa Clara County Superior Court judge succumbed on Jan. 11, 2014, at age 65.

At Cain's request, no memorial service will be held. Instead, he asked friends and colleagues to honor his memory by performing a random act of kindness.
"Tom was a great person," Presiding Judge Brian C. Walsh said in a written statement. "He was uncomplainingly helpful to all of his colleagues," and known for "his indelible spirit, optimism and kindness."
 
In his 24 years on the bench, Cain never put in for a particular judicial assignment, such as criminal courts or probate, as most judges do. Instead, he'd always write on the annual request form, "Where ever the presiding judge needs me," Walsh said.
 
Recently, Cain presided over two high-profile probate cases. One was the dispute over Monte Sereno millionaire Ravi Kumra's estate after he was slain in a botched robbery at his mansion. The other was the showdown between painter Thomas Kinkade's estranged wife and his live-in girlfriend. The women in the Kinkade matter wound up reaching a secret settlement. In the Kumra case, Cain ruled that two school-age daughters of a former prostitute not connected to his slaying were, in fact, Kumra's biological children and entitled to a monthly family allowance.
 
Cain was appointed by Gov. George Deukmejian in late 1989 after working as a lawyer in the Santa Clara County Counsel's Office. But he didn't just preside over legal cases. He also helped decide cooking competitions long before the Food Network made such contests popular. As a certified "Kansas City Barbecue Judge," he judged the "Jack Daniels' World Invitational Barbecue Competition" in Lynchburg, Tenn.
 
An avid cook, the judge also won an award from Sunset magazine for his salmon recipe. The magazine published the judge's recipe for oven-baked "Oriental Fish and Chips" in the August 1996 edition, complimenting him for his "striking presentation" of "potato-encrusted fish with a confetti of red and yellow bell peppers topped with steamed asparagus spears brushed with olive oil and browned under the broiler." "Cooking was his passion," his sister Pat Thompson said.
 
Cain was born in Maryland in 1948 and moved to San Jose with his family in 1956. He was the oldest of three children and the only boy. Elected class president at one point, he decided at an early age to become a lawyer, Thompson said.
 
"You never wanted to play Monopoly with him because he could B.S. his way through anything, which is important for being a lawyer," she said.
 
Last year, he received an award for outstanding service to the probate bar from by the Silicon Valley Bar Association. During his career, he also served as an instructor at Lincoln University School of Law and guest instructor in Southern Russia in a program sponsored by the American Bar Association.
Cain loved sports, so much so that he'd watch soccer even if it was broadcast on a foreign language station. He also attended spring training in Arizona for the Giants and the A's every season.
 
He died Saturday at his Willow Glen home, surrounded by his family. He is survived by wife Terri (who recently retired as director of court services), son Josh and daughter Alessandra '14 (and their mother, judge Vanessa Zecher B.A. '84, J.D. '87); sisters Pat and Jan, mother Mary Jane; stepchildren Anthony, Troy and Sara and grandchildren Elsa, Madica, Taylor and Dylan.
 
At Cain’s request, instead of a memorial service, he asked friends and colleagues to honor his memory by performing a random act of kindness.  The family requests that in lieu of flowers, a contribution to his memory be made to Optimal Hospice in Santa Clara.  Any sympathy notes may be sent to Campus Ministry which will be forwarded to the family.
submitted Jan. 16, 2014 10:29A
'70
Gerald "Jerry" Ritthaler

Gerald "Jerry" A. Ritthaler ’63, MBA ’70: December 5th, 1941 - February 22nd, 2013. Jerry, to his three sons, family, and countless friends, lived life with boundless enthusiasm. He was known to start conversations with a family member, close friend, or perfect stranger (soon to be a friend) by telling them about the best food he's ever had in this life, the greatest game or play he's ever seen, the nicest person he's ever met, or something very simple to the rest of us that simply amazed him. Pops would end the story with the declaration, How cool is that? It sounded like a question, but it was more of a statement about his zest for life and optimism. His enthusiasm was contagious and brought a smile or a laugh to everyone who came into his life, each and every day. Born on December 5, 1941 to Jaconda and Philip Ritthaler in Sacramento, CA, Jerry was destined to make friends and make a strong 1st impression from the day he was born. He grew up in the Sacramento area and attended college at Santa Clara University where he earned a Bachelor's and Master's Degree. After college, he had a successful business career in sales at General Foods, Sunshine Biscuits, and Kroger. Jerry's Bay area roots were an early indicator of one of his great loves in life  sports. From the time he could yell and listen to a game on the radio, he developed a great passion for sports, and this passion never wavered for a second. He cheered early and often for the Raiders and Athletics because of his strong California ties, and he never stopped cheering for his beloved Oakland teams, but he added many teams in Georgia to his shirt and hat collection when he moved to Georgia in 1979. Once his three boys Mike, Mark, and Matt attended and graduated from the University of Georgia, he was destined to be a life-long Dawgs fan. Pops also had enough spirit in his heart to add the Falcons to his list of football teams he pulled for. Sundays in the fall were never dull with Jerry around, and he always had the game on and a rooting interest in the outcome no matter who was playing. One of Jerry's other great sports loves was baseball. He started out an Oakland A's fan while in the Bay Area, but after moving to Georgia, he quickly adopted the Atlanta Braves as his favorite team. Pops was always ready to head to the ballpark and watch his beloved Braves with anyone who would go with him. No matter how many times they broke his heart in October, he was ready again the following spring, enthusiastic and full of optimism. When he was not in Atlanta, he was always looking for a good deal on some tickets so he could catch the local team and enjoy a few cold ones at the ball park. Pops also brought this love for baseball to his family. He coached his sons in little league baseball in Scotts Valley, CA, teaching them the fundamentals and never missing a game, but more than anything he taught them a love for baseball, sports, and competition. Pops kept the family baseball tradition and love of sports alive with his grandchildren, attending Matthew's baseball and hockey games, Katie's softball and gymnastics, Daniel's baseball and basketball, and Evan's baseball games. He was a fan of his sports teams and an even bigger fan of his boys and grandchildren. Later in his life, Jerry had the good fortune to meet Marilou, who became his wife in 2011. They enjoyed a loving and devoted marriage for 2 + all too short years, but they filled that time up with passion, laughter, and a great appreciation for the opportunity to find true love late in life. Jerry and Marilou shared their devotation to their Catholic Faith and attended church and bible study regularly together. The marriage of Jerry and Marilou also allowed two families to meet each other and become one as Mike and Daniel, Mark and Mary Beth along with Katie and Matthew, and Matt and Kim were able to meet Michelle and Scott Whitehead and their children Erin and Evan to create a new and loving family. Jerry's gift of bringing people together will never be forgotten. Pops was a father figure to many of his sons' close friends in the Dunwoody, GA area. Now and forever, all of those who were fortunate enough to meet Pops will remember him for his stories. He never bragged about himself, but he never stopped telling proud stories about his sister Phyllis and her husband Scott, the good people he met through his charitable work, the love he had for the choir at Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Church in Historic Sweet Auburn, and whomever he was going to meet tomorrow. Jerry had an opinion on everything and it was almost always a positive, kind, and hopeful one. Pops will be greatly missed but never forgotten. If the question is, How cool was that man? The answer is The Coolest of them All.ö We will hear his joyful voice in our heads for the rest of our lives. When Pops passes thru the gates of heaven, a crowd will welcome him. Some will have known him well, others simply heard he was coming, and then he will get back to work checking on his earth bound family and friends. Jerry is survived by his wife, Marilou Ritthaler, of Alpharetta; sons, Mike Ritthaler, of San Rafael, CA, Mark (wife, Mary Beth) Ritthaler, of Atlanta, Matt (wife, Kim) Ritthaler, of San Francisco, CA, step-daughter, Michelle (husband, Scott) Whitehead, of Cumming; grandchildren, Katie Ritthaler, Matthew Ritthaler, Daniel Ritthaler, Erin Whitehead, and Evan Whitehead; sister, Phyllis (husband, Scott) Keilholtz, Sacramento, CA and Nephew Erik Keilholtz (wife, Melanie and daughter, Amalia) of Vallejo, CA. 

submitted May. 22, 2013 4:20A
'70
Bill Deutsch

Bill Deutsch ’70 journeyed to Heaven on December 19 after more than two years of battling cancer. Born on May 15, 1948, he grew up in Downey, Calif. He chose to attend Loyola High School in Los Angeles. Bill graduated from Santa Clara University in 1970, and joined the Army as an officer where he spent six years serving his country. Bill spent most of his adult life in Stockton, working in different fields of Real Estate, while acquiring his Masters in Business. The last 23 years he spent as an MAI, Commercial Appraiser. Bill loved the Notre Dame Fighting Irish never missing a game, teaching his daughter, Katie, to say "Shake Down The Thunder" and "Go Irish" as soon as she could talk. He was a history buff who could not get enough books or memorabilia of all the American wars. Bill was in the Knights of Columbus where he served as the Grand Knight. The most important thing to Bill was his family, wife of 22 years, Mary Lou, daughter Katie, sister Emily and brother-in-law, Ken Keller, his nieces and their families, Uncle Louie Venturini and his family, and all his family in Southern California.

submitted Dec. 30, 2013 12:37P

1971

'71
Steven L. Tuma

Steven L. Tuma MBA ’71, 75, of Chatham, and formerly of Jacksonville, passed away Sunday, Feb. 24, 2013, at St. John's Hospital in Springfield. He was born Dec. 11, 1937, in Chicago, the son of Elmer and Dorothy Long Tuma. He married Margaret J. "Peggy" Jess on June 19, 1964, and she preceded him in death Jan. 2, 2002. He is survived by one son, Steven S. (Amy) Tuma of Machesney Park; one daughter, Mary Tuma Werries of Chatham; and three grandchildren, Zachary Tuma of Janesville, Wis., and Alyssa and Kyle Werries, both of Chatham. Mr. Tuma was a 1956 graduate of Morton (Illinois) High School, and then attended Roosevelt University in Chicago. During that time, he served in the U.S. Naval Reserve. Upon graduation, he began active duty with the Navy, serving on the USS Nereus. He was honorably discharged in 1967, and began work with the Lockheed Corporation in San Jose, Calif. While at Lockheed, he received his MBA from Santa Clara University. He and his family then returned to Illinois and Steven began work as an engineer with the State of Illinois, retiring from the Illinois Commerce Commission in 1999. Mr. Tuma was a very active member of St. John's Lutheran Church in Chatham, and a member of the Jacksonville Amateur (HAM) Radio Club. He had also been a member of the Jacksonville Lions Club. He was a fantastic "Grampy," and loved attending all of his grandchildren's activities. 

submitted May. 22, 2013 4:31A
'71
Robert L. Granath

Robert L. Granath MBA '71, a resident of San Jose, died on Oct. 27, 2013 at age 80. He graduated with a B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Rochester in 1956. Bob worked at Lockheed Missiles and Space for 31 years. During this time he earned an MBA from Santa Clara University. He was Program Manager on Ascent Systems Program and later, Director of the launch base for Lockheed at Vandenberg Air Force Base. He retired in 1991. Survived by his wife Lynn, son Derek MBA ’86 (Jennifer), daughter Heidi (Michael Gough), son Todd (Chuckie), son Kent (Mona), and nine grandchildren, Alexis James, Chelsea Deatsch, Braden Gough, Dylan and Jordan Granath, Adam and Elise Granath and Melia and Cole Granath.

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 8:23P
UGRD Leavey Business '71
Richard Certo

Richard Certo ’71, September 5, 1949 - May 19, 2013. A resident of Scotts Valley, Certo passed away ten months after he became very ill with a rare type of lymphoma. Richard was born in Oakland, the oldest of five children, and was raised in Santa Clara. He graduated from Buchser High School in 1967, Santa Clara University in 1971, and launched his accounting career at Price Waterhouse. He then worked for Syntex and Argo Systems and moved to Scotts Valley in 1980 to serve as Seagate's first CFO. He spent the next 25 years working in business and venture capital, including time at Bell Micro and Al Shugart International. Richard worked hard and played hard. His passions were golf, good food, family, and friends. More than anything, he loved to laugh and make others laugh. He had an unforgettable smile and a loud, pure, infectious laugh that easily filled a room, a restaurant, or a movie theater. He had a wonderful sense of humor and a playful way of looking at things. He loved to have a good time and knew how important it was to enjoy life. Richard had a quick wit, a sharp mind, and a creative spirit. He loved a challenge, a complex problem, or an opportunity to improve upon something. He always had a project up his sleeve and several ideas brewing in his mind. His creations included "Improve Your Swing" golf app, several patented golf accessories, screenplays, children's books, a taco bar, and a few very eccentric Halloween costumes. He always found ways to keep life interesting and his mind engaged. He took pride in maintaining a beautiful home and yard, where he and his wife hosted many gatherings. Richard loved sports and physical activity. In addition to golfing, swimming, and cycling, he spent many years playing pick-up basketball and coaching youth soccer. In 2003 he participated in the week-long Cycle Oregon event and in 2010 he took the golf "trip of a lifetime" to Scotland. He loved to walk on the beach in Maui, play golf in Mexico, and hike through the forest at Henry Cowell State Park. His loyal corgis, Shorty and Lola, were at his side on countless walks through Hidden Glen. Richard is survived by his wife, Linda Teague, daughter Aly Certo and son-in-law Justin Weaver, son Kyle Certo, and step-children Abbey Teague and Kyle Teague. He is also survived by his siblings: Carol Poulsen, Donna Gamaly, Christine Certo, and Tom Certo. He was preceded in death by his daughter Lauren Certo. Richard's 4-year-old grandson Austin Weaver was the light of his life in recent years. Of Richard's many personal and professional accomplishments, perhaps the most valuable to him was that he was the first to make Austin laugh. Richard had hoped to travel to Southern Italy to explore his family's roots in Sicily. He loved all things Italian - the people, the food, and most of all, the Italian approach to life. Slow down. Enjoy yourself. Live in the moment. Don't take anything too seriously. As his disease progressed, Richard faced the end of his life with calm acceptance. More than once he shrugged his shoulders and said with characteristic ease and humor: "I picked the short straw." He made it home, which was his final wish, and died peacefully. He was surrounded by family and some of his closest friends in his final days. Richard's personality was larger than life, and the void that he leaves is immeasurable. If you wish to do something in Richard's honor, please consider donating blood, joining the national bone marrow registry, or volunteering with an organization that provides support to cancer patients.

submitted Jul. 19, 2013 4:40P
UGRD Arts & Sciences '71
Michael J. Clark

Michael John Clark ’71, M.A. ’72 was born in Richmond, Ind., Jan. 10, 1949. He passed away unexpectedly in San Luis Obispo on July 23, 2013.

He grew up in Campbell after living in Indiana for the first four years of his life. He attended Saint Lucy Catholic School in Campbell from the first through eighth grades. He attended Campbell High School where he played football and wrestled. He then attended Santa Clara University where he played football and graduated with a master's in history and teaching.

During his time attending Santa Clara University he met Maryanne Patricia Scott, “Patty.”

After graduating in 1971 and marriage in 1972, he worked for Atascadero Unified School District, where he taught English, history and driver's education for 14 years. He also coached swimming and football.

In 1973 he received his master's in administration from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.

After 14 years of teaching, he became the assistant principal at Atascadero Junior High. He then went on to become an elementary school principal at Creston and Carissa Plains, Lewis Avenue, San Benito and San Gabriel.

Mike retired in 2005 from Atascadero Unified School District and worked for a short time at Mission Prep High School as an assistant principal. 

He lived in Los Osos from 1972 to 2006, when he moved to Paso Robles to be closer to his children and grandchildren. In 2006 he became a proud grandpa.

He was a grandpa to five grandchildren. He was a proud father to three children, Kimberly Rivas (Dan), Kristi Roberson (Matt) and Will Clark (Autumn).

His students, faculty, wife, children, grandchildren and extended family were everything to him. He was dedicated to always making them happy. His sense of humor, smile and his laughter were contagious. He was selfless and often unwilling to take credit for his accomplishments. He always fought for the underdog and a just outcome. The likes of him will not soon enter this world again.

Mike was an animal lover and will be missed by his dogs, Sheena and Stryker, and his three kitties, which were dependent upon him for their many daily walks and treats.

He is survived by his wife, three children, five grandchildren, two sisters, Colleen Chiaramonte and Cathy Blass, brother, Tom Clark, and many nieces and nephews.

submitted Aug. 2, 2013 12:54P
'71
John D. Wilson

John Dudley Wilson '71, Sept. 4, 2013. Born in Lompoc, California, on Oct. 9, 1949, John graduated from Santa Clara University and Cal Poly with degrees in civil and transportation engineering. John was a consulting engineer his whole career working mostly in the Bay Area and his last professional association was with SANDIS. John had a full and successful life and will be remembered for his positive attitude. He enjoyed his family and friends, collecting books, restoring classic cars and remodeling boats. John is survived by his wife Kay of thirty years, his father Arthur Wilson, his brother Arthur Wilson Jr. and his sisters Marion, Casey, and Barbara. John was also very close to his extended family of nieces and nephews and in laws from the Wilson family and from Kay's family. 

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 12:33P

1972

GRD Ed./Couns Psych./Pastoral Min. '72
Michael J. Clark
see year 1971
'72
John J. Proulx

John Justin Proulx MBA ’72 April 14, 1938 - July 10, 2013. Resident of San Jose, John Justin Proulx, 75, passed away July 10, 2013 in San Jose, Calif., surrounded by his loving family. A native of SF, John attended USF earning his B.S. degree in accounting and later received his MBA from Santa Clara University. An auditor for many years, he became an IT manager in the early days of Silicon Valley. For 28 years, CPA John operated his own accounting practice, and used his financial expertise to help non-profit organizations in Santa Clara Valley. He is survived by: the love of his life and wife of 45 years, Bernadette; his beloved children, Rich Proulx (Rachel Antell) and Michelle Schuette (Derek); and, his adored grandchildren, Talia and Gabriel Antell-Proulx and Katie Schuette. He was also deeply grateful for his extended family, numerous close friends, and his physician Kenneth Greene, M.D. for his many years of care.

In John's words, "I am no longer physically with you, but am still with you in a spiritual way." He was a member of the Seeking Guidance men's group for 14 years. John enjoyed spending time with friends and family, travel, genealogy, collecting football memorabilia, and cheering on the 49ers - the pinnacle of his 60 years of "fandom" came earlier this year with his first trip to a Super Bowl. John was a very humble man, doing many things for many people without telling anyone. He will be missed by all who knew and loved him.

submitted Sep. 6, 2013 3:56P
'72
James J. Loftus III

James Joseph Loftus III '72 passed away from cancer the morning of Sept. 3, 2013. He was at home, resting peacefully, and in the company of loved ones. Jim was born May 17, 1950, to James Joseph Loftus Jr. and Mary King Loftus; both of San Francisco, Calf. He was raised in Mill Valley and San Francisco, attending St. Cecelia's elementary and Riordan High. He attended San Francisco City College, studying engineering, subsequently transferring to, and graduating from, Santa Clara University in 1972 with a degree in civil engineering. San Francisco's culture, ocean beaches and childhood friends remained strong identifiers throughout his life. With an eagerness to expand his horizons, he seized upon the chance in summer 1972 to move to Fairbanks. He persevered through that first winter, determined to give his new home a fair chance, eventually landing work on survey crews for the trans-Alaska oil pipeline. During the next few years, young Loftus worked in Alaska during the construction season and traveled extensively in the off-season. His work on the pipeline solidified his desire to live in Alaska, despite his rather unique distinction of having spent five consecutive Septembers in Atigun Pass! He welcomed Alaska's challenges, the unparalleled scenery, and the host of characters that became friends, mentors and, eventually, family. Increasing responsibilities and in-depth exposure to engineering while working on the pipeline inspired him to return to school, completing a graduate degree in structural engineering at the University of Washington in Seattle. Upon finishing his master's degree in 1979, he returned to Fairbanks for perhaps the most important summer of his life during which he fell in love with Eileen Stack. The lovely couple married Oct. 6, 1979, and were a picture perfect pair! Suit on and freshly groomed, the now husband and father pounded the pavement in Seattle, seeking work as structural engineer. Landing a job at a well-respected firm, he flourished and developed his skills while working on prominent projects in Seattle, including the iconic Columbia Tower. It wasn't long before the call of the wild beckoned and in 1984 Jim and Eileen packed up their growing family and headed north to Fairbanks. Recognizing the need for local structural engineering services, Loftus Engineering, Inc was formed. Jim's professional mindset, first-hand knowledge of Alaska's extreme climate, and a true passion for structural engineering contributed to the company's success. The company grew over time through several mergers with other local firms, becoming PDC Engineering, Inc. in 1998. As a principal partner, Jim managed the structural engineering department, and under his direction, PDC designed many of Fairbanks' well known structures including the Rabinowitz State Courthouse, UAF's Museum of the North and the Centennial Pedestrian Bridge. You can hardly look more than two directions in Fairbanks without identifying a structure to which he directly contributed. A biography of Jim Loftus would hardly be complete without mention of his running career. Beginning at a young age, he enjoyed running and competing against others. He became an accomplished middle distance runner while in junior college, and for many years after he was a fixture at the all-comers track meets in the Bay area, often leading the pack in his specialty, the 800-meter. For Jim, running and training became, as he described it, a form of personal yoga, bringing peace, reflection, and opportunity for personal improvement. He was active in the local running scene, organizing, volunteering, and mentoring Fairbanks runners and track meets from the mid-'80s until 2012. As a metaphor for the gentle parenting and encouragement he gave as a father and coach, he preferred to allow young runners to "wiggle in the blocks" rather than call a false start, believing it important that everyone gets to run the race. He pursued running throughout his life and had well respected finishes of second place at the U.S. Masters National Championships in 2000, and fifth place in the World Senior Championships in 2005, both in the 800-meter. He considered these to be great personal accomplishments, caring more about the experience than the finish; he relished meeting and running with elite runners of the world. With a turntable in constant rotation and often a book in hand, music and reading were cornerstones of his daily routine. He was intensely interested in an astonishing range of music from Americana and vintage rock to punk and alt-country. Readings later in life focused on philosophy and history, meticulously building a base for more probing thought. Using a scholarly approach, he studied philosophy from classic to current and actively engaged fellow scholars in discussion as he searched for continued understanding of the human experience. His beliefs of expanding one's knowledge of the greater world around us, personal responsibility and work ethic were applied to both his professional and family lives. Jim's greatest joy and most valued accomplishment was his family. He is survived by his wife Eileen, sons Aran, Oliver, Michael, and daughter Clare. He loved to be among them all, delighting in their diversity, marveling at their individuality and thankful for their unity. He is also survived by his father, James Joseph Loftus Jr., and sisters, Jeanne, Rosemary, Teresa, Eileen and Julie. He was preceded in death by his mother, Mary Loftus. In the last months of his life, Jim's physical condition deteriorated, though his inquisitive mind and quick laughter remained. Many will retain an image of him running, tall and strong, powering through the last turn, arms and legs churning like pistons, an outward symbol of his capacity for precise, intelligent and consequential work, and his deep love of the whole show. According to his wishes, his passing will be marked by an Irish style wake, commencing at 5 p.m. Sept. 13, 2013, at the Fairbanks Mushers Hall off Farmers Loop Road. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation to one of Jim's preferred charities: Running Club North, Engineers Without Borders USA, or the J. Michael Carroll Cancer Center in Fairbanks. A thoughtfully recorded interview of Jim recounting his adventures is available through UAF's Oral History Program. 

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 8:32P

1973

GRD Law '73
William F. Caro

William F. Caro '54, J.D. '73. Feb. 26, 2014. Born in San Jose in 1932, Caro inherited his father's devotion to SCU's fabled football history and loved to recount, play-by-play, Santa Clara's heartbreaking 7-6 loss to Stanford in the very first college game he ever attended, as an eight-year-old, on Oct. 12, 1940. Athletic loyalties notwithstandng, he did graduate work at Stanford, earning his M.B.A. in 1960 with an emphasis in marketing. His subsequent career as an advertising media director brought him to agencies in San Francisco and Los Angees and Eventually to Coakley-Heagerty in Santa Clara. He later taught advertising at San Jose State University. Caro spent his retirement years in Santa Clara, not far from where the palm and olive mingle. He occasionally enjoyed an idle hour in the university library researching the glory days of Bronco football. He is survived by his brothers, Robert, S.J. '58, M.Div '70 and Paul '62.

submitted Mar. 25, 2014 10:43P
'73
Thomas W. Cain
see year 1970
'73
Milton Crane

Milton Crane MBA ’73, October 22, 2013. He died in Sparks, Nev. Milton was born in New York to Charlotte and Louis Cohen. He enlisted in the Navy in 1944 and was trained as an Aviation Electronic Tech Third Class served until June 1946. He was awarded both the Victory Medal & American Theatre Medal. He was able to attend college on the GI Bill at Cal Poly Tech. in San Luis Obispo, CA, Stanford and the University of Santa Clara. He met his wife Jean at Stanford and they were married in September of 1961. Milton was an electronics engineer for Lockheed Corp in California and Arizona. Milton is survived by his son, Matthew, daughter Gretchen (Michael) de la Torre, granddaughters Mia, Emma, and his sister Barbara (Carl) Parducci. The family would like to express their gratitude to the staff at The Cascades of the Sierra in Sparks, NV. Even though he had been there a short time, the care and compassion shown to him was wonderful and made a big impact on his final days.

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 10:21P
'73
Joyce Ardell Jackson

Joyce Ardell Jackson '73: 1947-2013 Joyce Ardell Jackson departed this life on Sunday, Dec. 29, 2013, in San Pedro, Calif., following a decades-long struggle with juvenile rheumatoid arthritis. Born June 2, 1947, in Berkeley, California, she was a spirited youngster, adventurous and friendly. At the age of 12, she contracted arthritis, a defining period in her life. Over the years she faced many challenges because of her condition, enduring more than 50 operations. Yet she rarely succumbed to self-pity. At one point she even called herself "The Bionic Woman," a moniker she had borrowed from a popular 1970s TV series.

After attending public schools in Oakland and Hayward, Calif., Joyce attended Santa Clara University in Santa Clara, Calif., graduating in 1973. Determined to be independent, she worked for a number of firms in the Bay Area, including McDonnell Douglas, British Telecommunications, The San Jose Mercury News, and Community Resources for Independent Living. At times, she found it necessary to juggle two part-time jobs with her full-time job.

Earlier in her career, soon after accepting a position with the Center for Independent Living (CIL) in Berkeley, California, Joyce began a second defining period in her life.  In April of 1977, she took part in a disability rights sit-in organized by people with disabilities.  Joining some 150 severely disabled demonstrators and their supporters, the protestors occupied the Federal Building for nearly a month at the San Francisco regional offices of the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare (HEW), defying federal and local officials.
 
As part of the Demonstration Joyce was one of twenty activists who went to Washington DC to meet with Carter administration officials.  While in DC, the activists convinced HEW officials to implement Section 504 of the 1973 Rehabilitation Act-- the landmark civil rights legislation banning discrimination against people with disabilities. From that point on, all agencies and programs receiving federal funds had to find ways to accommodate people with disabilities.  The "504" victory ushered in life-changing disability rights activism and laid the groundwork for the later Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990.
 
Later, Joyce would serve three terms on the board of the American Coalition of Citizens with Disabilities, attending board meetings at the ACCD home office in Washington, D.C., and traveling around the country to tell people about the new law.  She also continued working as a disability counselor for nonprofits and as a telecommunications support representative in the private sector.  By the mid-nineties, however, her physicians had intervened and urged her to retire.
 
Joyce will be dearly missed by her family members. Among her survivors are siblings Thelma Stiles of Napa, Calif., LeRoy Charles Jackson, Jr. '63 of Phoenix, Ariz., Gail (Frank) Harris of San Pedro, Calif., and Raymond (Lilia) Jackson of Fairfield, Calif.; nieces Pamela Stiles of San Francisco, Monica (Jose) Blanco of San Pedro, and Ashley (Paul) Turek of San Francisco and Beverly Hills; nephew Vincent Jackson of Fairfield; grandnephew Dominic Blanco of San Pedro; and grandnieces Sophia Turek and Vanessa Turek of Beverly Hills. Joyce's survivors also include first cousins James (Gretchen) Peters III of Storrs, Conn., Donna (Cyril) Burke of Norristown, Penn., Kimberley Bourne-Vanneck of St. Thomas, U.S. Virgin Islands, Brenda Williams of New Orleans, and Richard (Andrea) Jackson Jr. of New Orleans; and second cousins Joy Jackson of New Orleans, Elizabeth (Greg) Howes of Iowa City, Iowa, Allison Bourne-Vanneck of St. Thomas, and Richard Bourne-Vanneck II of St. Thomas. Joyce will be missed as well by her close friends and former colleagues in the San Francisco-Bay Area and by the many friends she made while living with her sister Gail and brother-in-law Frank in San Pedro, Miami, Florida, and Frankfurt, Germany. Joyce was preceded in death by her parents Bernice and LeRoy Charles Jackson, brother-in-law Patterson Stiles, Jr., aunts Marie Peters and Modess Jackson, uncles Richard Jackson and James Peters, and second cousin Richard Jackson III.
submitted Feb. 10, 2014 4:50P
'73
John A. McKay

John Arlen McKay M.A. ’73, Oct. 25, 2013. He passed away peacefully due to complications related to Alzheimer’s Disease, with family members by his side. John was born Dec. 22, 1932, in Keokuk, to John Henry and Mildred Dorothy McKay. John served in the U.S. Army in Korea. After returning, he completed his college degree in mathematics. The family moved to Mountain View, Calif., in the early 1960s. John worked for Lockheed as a scientist and computer programmer. He earned his master’s degree in mathematics from the University of Santa Clara. He worked at Lockheed until his retirement. He enjoyed classical music, spending time with his wife, caring for the family’s dogs, and trips to Reno. He is survived by his wife, Soon Im; and sons, John K. (Michelle) and James Lee. He is survived locally by his brother, Samuel Thomas McKay (Sharon); sisters, Kay Branson (George) and Carolyn Dodson (Norman); and many nieces and nephews.

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submitted Dec. 3, 2013 10:39P
'73
Edward P. Davis Jr.

Edward P. Davis Jr. J.D ’73 died July 19, 2013. He came from an unusual background for a man who emerged as a strong advocate of freedom of the press. He was a child of the military, a Naval ROTC student at Stanford and a former federal attorney who helped prosecute Patty Hearst.

For a long stretch in the 1980s and early 1990s, Davis was the attorney for the Mercury News at a time when a confident and improving newspaper did battle with local governments over public records and public meetings. He rarely lost a case.  "There was no better advocate for open government and open meetings than Ed Davis," said Bob Ingle, the former executive editor of the Mercury News. "He wouldn't have put the time and effort into those cases if he hadn't been a true believer.'' 

Davis, 64, died on July 19 in San Antonio from complications of a double-lung transplant in 2011. His friends say the surgery was successful but left Davis vulnerable to infection.  A witty man who had the ability to think on his feet and regale friends with stories, Davis in recent years had defended white-collar clients charged with a variety of crimes -- anti-trust, money-laundering, export offenses and tax fraud.

Even when his health declined, the attorney retained a sense of community obligation: After undergoing his lung transplant, he spoke to groups about his experience and volunteered with Donate Life California, an advocacy group for organ donation.

Davis was born in La Jolla on Aug. 23, 1948, the son of Shirley Stock Davis and Lt. Commander Edward P. Davis Sr. As a "military brat,'' he moved frequently.  It was in Hawaii, where he attended Punahou School for two years, that he became a lifelong San Francisco Giants fan while listening to the recorded summations of their games.  Davis graduated from Blackford High School in San Jose, where he met his wife, Sheryl Cook M.A. ’80. He went on to Stanford, where he joined NROTC in hopes of becoming a naval aviator.  When medical reasons prevented that, he became a private pilot anyway -- and later an accomplished sailor. His friends say his experience at Stanford left him with a decidedly more liberal political outlook than his parents.  After graduating from Santa Clara Law School in 1973, Davis clerked for U.S. District Judge Oliver Carter for a year and then joined the federal prosecutor's office in San Francisco, where he worked between 1974 and 1978 and served as a junior attorney on the Hearst case.  Then he joined the Rankin Oneal law firm in downtown San Jose, where he became the Mercury News attorney. When he won a public records case, executive editor Ingle published a photo of the check the government wrote to pay for Davis' attorneys fees. Davis moved his practice to the Pillsbury law firm when it opened an office in downtown San Jose in the mid-1980s. He later joined a boutique law firm and practiced at Gray, Cary Ware & Freidenrich before finishing his career as a partner with Orrick, Herrington and Sutcliffe. He also taught at Santa Clara University. A former San Carlos resident who moved with his family to Wimberley, Texas, to be closer to his son, Davis is survived by his wife, Sheryl, a son, Braden, his daughter-in-law Amy, and two grandchildren.

submitted Sep. 6, 2013 3:42P

1974

'74
Steven Gunia

Steven Gunia MBA '74, a resident of Monterey, passed away unexpectedly October 21, 2013 surrounded by family and friends. He was 65. He is survived by his best friend and loving wife, Dolores; his mother Virginia of San Jose, sister Jacque Hennig (Jon) of Campbell, nieces Lindsay Hennig and Brittany Gilhooly (Tim), nephews Michael and Wyatt Gilhooly, stepson Sean Murphy, grandchildren Christina and Brenden Murphy (Laura) and great-granddaughter Scarlett.  Born in 1948, Steven was a graduate of Blackford High School and San Jose State University. A lifelong thirst for education led Steven to continue his education and obtain his Masters degree at Santa Clara University, and later on his law degree. In 1985, Steven and Dolores moved to Monterey. In addition to his legal practice, Steven became very active in his community. The United Way, the Monterey Museum of Art, Jesters, The Monterey County Symphony and The Ombudsmen are among some of the charitable causes he gave his time to. He also loved to open their home and host events for many non-profit organizations. Steven loved to play bridge, and achieved Life Master status. He was a bridge director, and also began directing and teaching bridge on cruise ships, combining his love of the game with his passion for travel, allowing him and Dolores to travel the world. He loved museums, enjoyed cooking, was an avid golfer and enjoyed his membership at Corral de Tierra Country Club. A lover of nature, Steven enjoyed the outdoors - especially fly-fishing and skiing.

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 12:57P
'74
Frank D. Rabourn

Frank Dee Rabourn MBA '74 Nov. 21, 1929 - Nov. 13, 2013 Resident of San Jose Frank was a devout Christian throughout his life and passed into the arms of his savior, Lord Jesus Christ on Nov. 13, 2013 surrounded by his beloved family: Joyce Rabourn, his wife of forty-three years, and his children- Karin Moscato, Michael Rabourn, Lise Lucas, Frank M. Rabourn, Dianne Rabourn, Nancy (Tina) Serfozo, and Jess B. Rabourn. He spent his early years in Texas and Oklahoma. His family was his first love, followed by flying his aerobatic airplane and scuba diving throughout the world. Frank also enjoyed hunting and had a rule that anything that was shot must be eaten. Once one of his young sons pridefully shot a crow on a telephone line from an impressive distance. Frank forced him to clean, cook, and eat his crow. Frank was a veteran of the U.S. Air Force and served in the post World War II occupation of Germany. He then graduated in Physics from the University of Oklahoma and from Santa Clara University with an MBA. His career took him to Tinker Air Force Base, North American Aviation, Vandenberg Air Force Base, and Lockheed Martin. He leaves nine grandchildren: Sean Rabourn, Wayne Kearns, Michael Kearns, Douglas Kearns, Ethan Kearns, Caroline Rabourn, Donald Lucas III (Luke), Madeline Lucas, and Cole Lucas. He is also survived by siblings Ira Rabourn, Nan Conway and Jess C. Rabourn. The family thanks Frank's exceptional caregiver, Shanna Gans. Frank was diagnosed with Lou Gehrig's disease, ALS, in late 2008. He was the inspiration for The ALS Emergency Treatment Fund, one of the few organizations focused on immediate treatment options.

submitted Feb. 3, 2014 3:40P
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