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  •  Video art show: Memory Mine

    Video art exhibition in the Art Department Gallery: Memory Mine

    Lydia Greer
    Farley Gwazda
    Azin Seraj

    October 25-December 3, 2010, Opening: Thursday, Nov. 4
    Artist Lecture: 5-5:45 p.m. in Fine Arts room F
    Reception and artist talks: 5:45-8 p.m.

    In this collection of video work, the artists use the camera as a tool to engage memory and reexamine personal history. When the video camera turns on, the subject becomes an actor and the story changes with each retelling. Fixed notions of personal history and cultural identity are complicated through differences in representation.

     A Self Made House opens with the artist Lydia Greer’s stepfather telling a family folktale of two sisters, a violent hog, and a house that forms itself. Much like the way the story is told, Greer shapes this film through hand-made animation, performance, and shifting narratives. Greer lets the story (and the house) build itself through the assemblage of divergent genres, interpretations, and narrative devices.

     Farley Gwazda initiates intimate interactions between participants through modest materials and tactile games. In this new work, Gwazda constructs a dimly-lit box in which family members place their hands inside to hold and talk about the contents, largely household and childhood objects. In this safe confessional space, family members describe the nostalgic, remorseful, and humorous memories these objects evoke. Gwazda’s unassuming use of play allows the participants and viewers to engage with the work in a sincere way.

     In Azin Seraj’s video installation, the viewer is drawn into a dense visual landscape of everyday life—bustling urban streets, colorful mosques, and evening street vendors. Through the split-screen display, the viewer’s attention is placed on the liminal moments of time, space, and memory. This meditative work resists the illustration of Iran as a media headline, a place of war and unrest. Instead, we see a montage of Iran that moves in real time, rich in subtlety and reflexivity.

     -Curated by Rose Khor

    Art Department Gallery
    Gallery Hours: Mon.-Fri., 9 a.m.-5 p.m
    If you have a disability and require accommodation, please contact (408) 554-5483.

     

     

  •  Banning of Ethnic Studies in Arizona

    Banning of Ethnic Studies in Arizona

    Facilitated by Courtney Mohler
    Ethnic Studies Program,

    Wednesday, November 3rd, 2010
    3:45 to 5:00pm
    Williman room , Benson Center

    Come and engage in a dialogue about the controversial banning of Ethnic Studies in public education in Arizona.

    Co-sponsered by the Office of Multicultural Learning, Multicultural Center and Ethnic Studies Program.

    If you would like to attend please RSVP to Pauline Nguyen at oml@scu.edu.

    Part of the Legacies Theme calendar of events.

  •  Development of Vaccines and Adjuvants Targeting HIV Infection

     Development of Vaccines and Adjuvants Targeting HIV Infection

    Jacquelyn Gervay-Hague University of California, Davis, Department of Chemistry, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA  95616

    Friday October 29, 2010
    4:00 to 5:00 pm
    Alumni Science 120

    Research in the Gervay-Hague laborary is focused on developing methods for the efficient conjugation of site-specific functionalized peptides as vaccine candidates. In an effort to improve avidity and bioavailability, peptides directed against neutralizing antibodies have been successfully multimerized using a 1-3 dipolar cyclization strategy.  Our central contributions involve introduction of a trialkyne functionality onto rigid scaffolds that promote the cyclization process. The synthesis of alpha-galactosyl ceramide natural products complements the vaccine design program.  These natural products were originally isolated from marine sponge, and quantities for biological studies were scarce.  One-pot synthetic routes for large quantity production of alpha-galactosyl ceramides using glycosyl iodide chemistry have been developed. This synthetic chemistry platform exploits the unique reactivity of glycosyl iodides providing highly efficient routes to immunostimulatory glycolipids for adjuvant therapy.

    Jacquelyn Gervay Hague received a B.S. degree from The University of California, Los Angeles, in 1985 where she also earned a Ph.D. in 1990 under the direction of Professor Michael E. Jung.  In 1990 she moved to Yale University as a National Institutes of Health Postdoctoral Fellow with Professor Samuel J. Danishefsky.  In 1992, Professor Gervay-Hague joined the faculty in the Department of Chemistry at the University of Arizona and she was promoted to Associate Professor in 1998.  In 2000, Professor Gervay Hague worked as an on-sight consultant at Roche Bioscience in Palo Alto.  And she was appointed Professor of Chemistry at University of California, Davis in 2001.  In 2009, she assumed the position of Associate Vice Provost for Outreach and Engagement in the office of the Chancellor and Provost at UC, Davis.   

    Professor Gervay Hague’s research interests are in the area of carbohydrate chemistry directed toward the design and synthesis of chemotherapeutics targeting HIV infection and cancer.  Although the disease states differ, the methods of drug development employed by her research group consistently involve understanding the disease processes at a molecular level.  This approach has naturally led to studies at the interface of chemistry and biology.  In these investigations, the development of new synthetic methods has provided access to compounds that uniquely serve as biological probes to study structure/activity relationships.  Development of NMR techniques for solution-phase structure determination, and novel biological assays for testing interactions between small molecules and proteins has also been a focus of her research efforts.  More recently, solid phase synthesis of amide-linked carbohydrates has led to the production of novel materials with stable secondary structure in aqueous solution providing a foundation for future investigations in artificial protein engineering.

    Professor Gervay Hague was named an Eli Lilly Grantee in 1997 and was appointed a Sloan Fellow in 1998.  In 1999, She was awarded the Horace S. Isbell Prize by the Carbohydrate division of the American Chemical Society, and she was also the recipient of the GenCorp Technology Achievement Award. The American Chemical Society recognized Professor Gervay-Hague’s excellence in science and contributions to the society by naming her among the inaugural Fellow’s of ACS in 2009.  Professor Gervay-Hague currently serves as an Associate Editor for the Journal of Organic Chemistry.  She is also on the Board of Editors of Organic Reactions.

  •  SCU Mathematics/CS Colloquium Series Fall 2010

    Title: Mathematics in Medical Device Research & Development

    Speaker: Derek Purdy, BaroSense, Inc.

    Tuesday, November 16, 2010
    3:50 pm.
    O'Connor 207

    Abstract: Have you ever sat in a math class and wondered, when am I ever going to use this stuff?? This colloquium will explore the application of mathematics at start-up companies in the medical device industry. The use of math adds robustness to specification development and makes claims about data more credible. Math is useful in developing models to explain test results and also to predict future results. Perhaps most importantly, people who can understand, use, and explain mathematics to others in a friendly, non-condescending way are generally respected for it and are taken more seriously by their peers than those who cannot. Learn how you can be a leader in your field by applying what you already know! The branches of mathematics drawn upon for this discussion will include arithmetic and algebra, probability & statistics, and integral calculus.

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation,
    please call/email Rick Scott 408-554-4460/rscott at scu dot edu (or
    use 1-800-735-2929 TTY—California Relay).

  •  SCU Mathematics/CS Colloquium Series Fall 2010

    Title: From Spheres to Dots

    Speaker: Ellen Veomett, CSU East Bay

    Tuesday 2 November, 2010
    3:50 pm.
    O'Connor 207

    Abstract: Say you are given a rubber band which is not rubbery at all; in fact, its length is fixed. You are asked to make a shape with the largest possible enclosed area. What kind of shape would you make? This question is an instance of an isoperimetric inequality. Given a fixed "perimeter", find the shape with the largest "area". In this talk, we will discuss a few very different types of isoperimetric inequalities. We will explore the Euclidean isoperimetric inequality, along with a clever proof of that inequality using the geometric Brunn-Minkowski Theorem. We will then consider a couple of isoperimetric questions in discrete spaces; one being the set of all integer points inside a box. Some of the shapes of the resulting sets of minimal boundary may surprise you!

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation,
    please call/email Rick Scott 408-554-4460/rscott at scu dot edu (or
    use 1-800-735-2929 TTY—California Relay).

  •  SCU Mathematics/CS Colloquium Series Fall 2010

    SCU Mathematics/CS Colloquium Series Fall 2010

    Title: Factoring on a Quantum Computer

    Speaker:Wolfgang Polak, Computer Science Consultant

    Tuesday,October 26, 2010
    3:50 pm.
    O'Connor 207

    Abstract: All practical public-key encryption systems rely on the complexity of either factoring or discrete logarithms. Both problems can be solved efficiently on a quantum computer. Thus, once built, quantum computers can defeat most known digital security schemes.

    This talk introduces essential features of quantum mechanics needed to characterize quantum information, quantum state transformations and their use for computation. Peter Shor's polynomial-time factoring algorithm will be used to illustrate the unique features of quantum computation.

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation,
    please call/email Rick Scott 408-554-4460/rscott at scu dot edu (or
    use 1-800-735-2929 TTY—California Relay).

  •  The Storm That Swept Mexico

    The Storm That Swept Mexico

    Wednesday November 10, 2010
    5:00pm
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    The Storm That Swept Mexico, an NEH-funded documentary produced by Raymond Telles and Kenn Rabin and narrated by Luis Valdez, tells the gripping story of the revolution.  Luis Valdez will introduce the film with brief remarks.  Mr. Valdez founded El Teatro Campesino and received an honorary doctorate from Santa Clara University in 1992.

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

  •  Musical Tribute to the Mexican Revolution

    Musical Tribute to the Mexican Revolution

    Paco Padilla

    Tuesday November 9, 2010
    7:00 to 9:00 pm
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    Paco Padilla, a native son of Tlaquepaque, is an internationally acclaimed composer and performer of the modern Mexican folk-music-inspired genre known as nueva canción or "new song."

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

  •  Music at Noon

    Music at Noon

    Wednesday October 27, 2010
    Noon
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    A performance featuring the work of Mexican composers and performers as interpreted by our students and special guest artists.

     If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

  •  The Novels of the Mexican Revolution

    The mexican revolution in Arts Symposium Presents

    The Novels of Mexican revolution

    One of the most influential genres in Latin American literary history, La Novela de la Revolución contributed to the remaking of a “new Mexico” and opened an influential debate on the role of the indigenous and the campesino figures in Twentieth Century Latin American art. These novels were also influential in shaping Mexican-American debates on Mexican identity. The novels were openly reviewed by the press in California and Texas, in particular La Prensa of San Antonio and La Opinion of Los Angeles, due to their economic and commercial success.

    Dr. Juan Velasco, associate professor of English and modern languages and literatures Tuesday, October 26, 2010
    5-7 pm  ,Williman Room, Benson Memorial Center

    Dr. Juan Velasco, Associate Professor in the Department of English and Modern Languages and Literatures, teaches courses in contemporary Latin American and Chicano/a Literature, and Film. He received his first Ph.D. in 1992 from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain. His area of specialization was Contemporary Latin American Literature and his dissertation title was: Las diferentes ediciones de "La Sombra del Caudillo" de Martín Luis Guzmán.  In 1995 he received his second Ph.D. from UCLA. His area of specialization was Contemporary Chicano/a Literature and the dissertation title was Labyrinth of Mexicanness: The Construction of Ethnicity in Contemporary Chicano/a Autobiography.  He taught at the University of Kansas, and since 2000 has taught at Santa Clara University.

    This event is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, the Latin American Studies Program,and the Office for Multicultural Learning

    The Mexican Revolution of 1910 represents a milestone in the history of Mexico. As a movement for social justice and social change, the Revolution ended 30 years of dictatorship and established the foundations for modern Mexico. The widespread violence produced a massive migration of Mexicans to the United States. The Revolution inspired literature, music, and art that drew their themes from these historical periods. The aim of this symposium is to celebrate these creative arts.

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

  •  WGST Fall Lunch Lecture

    Aunting- Cultural Practices that sustain Family and Community Life.

    Laura Ellingson, Communication Department
    11:45-1:00pm
    Wednesday
    Oct. 27th 2010

    In this engaging book, Laura Ellingson and Patricia Sotirin construct a consid-eration of "aunts" that moves from noun to verb. "Aunts" is more than a group of people or a role; instead, "to aunt" is a practice, something people "do." Some women "aunt" as second mothers, friends, or mentors, while others play more peripheral roles. In either case, aunts nonetheless significantly impact their nieces’ and nephews' life choices.


    Books will be available for purchase at this event.

  •  Environmental Studies Institute Fall 2010 Seminar Series

    “The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and the Precautionary Principle”


    Mike Meyer, Dpt. of Philosophy; Ken Manaster, Santa Clara Law;
    Keith Warner, Religious Studies Dpt. and Director of
    Education for the Center for Science, Technology, and Society


    November 10th 12-1pm in Media Room A of the Harrington Learning Commons


    Co-sponsored by Ethics at Noon & the Ignatian Center

  •  Environmental Studies Institute Fall 2010 Seminar Series

    "Healthy Food Resources Assessment in Santa Clara"


    Aimee Reedy, Doctor of Education (EdD), Master of Public
    Health (MPH) – Health Trust Vice President


    October 29th from 12-1pm in the Kennedy Commons
    Co-sponsored by the Food and Agribusiness Institute

  •  The Department of Anthropology's Seminar Series

    Drs. Michelle Bezanson and Sean Watts,
    and the students from ANTH, ENVS, and BIO,
    Santa Clara University

    27 October 2010
    5:00 – 6:00 pm.
    Kennedy Commons

    “Monkeys, soil, frogs, and sustainability in Costa Rica.”

    Drs. Bezanson and Watts,along with Rochelle Stowe, Megan King, Kyla Moran, Joe O'Brien, Carly Zipper, and Elisa Fanucchi, will answer numerous questions on research in Costa Rica. How does soil vary in different areas of a rainforest? What is it like to climb a rainforest tree?How do capuchin monkeys interact with their environment? Does poison-dart frog behavior vary according to color brightness and intensity of individual frogs? What are the ethical issues of doing research in fragile ecosystems? They will explore these issues using recent research at Estacion Biological La Suerte in Northeastern Costa Rica.

     

  •  Interdisciplinary Seminar

    Dr. Amelia Fuller

    SCU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

     

    Monday October 18, 2010

    4-5:30 pm

    Alumni Science 246

     

    Abstract:

    Oligomers of N-substituted glycine, peptoids, have been valuable targets for study and application as potential therapeutics, as nanomaterials, and as organocatalysts. Peptoids can mimic structural and functional properties of natural peptides, and they can be efficiently prepared using reliable synthetic methods. Research in my lab aims to develop new methods to examine the three-dimensional structures of peptoids, particularly those that are similar to protein substructures. We have prepared peptoids that include an environmentally sensitive fluorophore, 4-DMN. The fluorescence emission intensity of 4-DMN varies with the polarity and rigidity of its local medium. Most of our 4-DMN-modified peptoids are predicted to adopt a helical three-dimensional structure, and we have varied the patterning and display of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups relative to 4-DMN to change its local environment. We find that the fluorescence intensity changes correlate with our predictions about the local polarity and rigidity of the environment of 4-DMN in the context of the peptoid’s three-dimensional structure.

  •  The History of the Mexican Revolution 1910-1920

    The Mexican Revolution of 1910 represents a milestone in the history of Mexico.  As a movement for social justice and social change, the Revolution ended 30 years of dictatorship and established the foundations for modern Mexico.  The widespread violence produced a massive migration of Mexicans to the United States.  The Revolution inspired literature, music, and art that drew their themes from these historical periods.  The aim of this symposium is to celebrate these creative arts.  This symposium launches the 2010-12 diversity theme, Legacies.

    Dr. Ramon Chacon, associate professor of history and ethnic studies

    Tuesday, October 19, 2010
    5-7 pm

    Williman Room, Benson Memorial Center

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

    Dr. Ramon Chacon
  •  Environmental Studies Institute Fall Seminar Series

    "Environmental Injustice and Catholic Social Ethics: The Reality of the Issues and the Schope of our Response"

    Kristing Shrader-Frechette, Director of the Center of Environmental Justice and Children's Health - University of Notre Dame

    October 22nd from 1-2 pm in the Saint Clare Room of the Harrington Learning Commons

    Co-sponsored by the Ignatian Center

  •  Mathematics/CS Department Fall Colloquium Series

    Ken McLaughlin of University of Arizona and MSRI will speak on "Random Matrices Beyond the Usual Universality Classes"

    Abstract:
    The statistical behavior of eigenvalues of large random matrices (i.e. in the limit when the matrix size tends to infinity) has been investigated extensively, for probability densities of the form C exp{-Tr V(M)} where V(x) is a smooth, real valued function of the real variable x, and V(M) is defined on matrices by "the usual procedure".


    First goal: provide a background and introduction to the above.

    But for probability densities in which the TRACE does not appear linearly, the situation is less understood. A simple example is: C exp{ (Tr ( M^2))^2} (i.e. square the trace).


    Second goal: explain the source of the complication.

    Third goal: Describe results. (Joint work with Misha Stepanov,
    Univ. of Arizona)
     

  •  The Thing We Do ... An Evening With the Music Faculty

    Center of Performing Arts

    Help kick off the new performing season with the Santa Clara University Music faculty performing some of their favorite music.  Performers include:  Hans Boepple, piano, Claudia Bloom, violin, Liliane Cromer, mezzo soprano, David Flores, percussion, William Harvey, trumpet, Kathleen Ludowise, piano and Nancy Wait-Kromm, soprano.

    Friday, October 1, 2010, 8 pm, Music Recital Hall

  •  The Department of Art & Art History Present Don Meyer

    September 20 - October 15, 2010

    Opening:  Friday, October 1st
      Artist Lecture: 4-5 p.m. in Fine Arts room G
      Reception: 5-7 p.m.

    Art Department Gallery
    Gallery Hours:  Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

    If you have a disability and require reasonable accommodation, please contact (408) 554-5483.
     

 
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