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  •  Musical Tribute to the Mexican Revolution

    Musical Tribute to the Mexican Revolution

    Paco Padilla

    Tuesday November 9, 2010
    7:00 to 9:00 pm
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    Paco Padilla, a native son of Tlaquepaque, is an internationally acclaimed composer and performer of the modern Mexican folk-music-inspired genre known as nueva canción or "new song."

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

  •  Music at Noon

    Music at Noon

    Wednesday October 27, 2010
    Noon
    Recital Hall, Music and Dance Building

    A performance featuring the work of Mexican composers and performers as interpreted by our students and special guest artists.

     If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

  •  The Novels of the Mexican Revolution

    The mexican revolution in Arts Symposium Presents

    The Novels of Mexican revolution

    One of the most influential genres in Latin American literary history, La Novela de la Revolución contributed to the remaking of a “new Mexico” and opened an influential debate on the role of the indigenous and the campesino figures in Twentieth Century Latin American art. These novels were also influential in shaping Mexican-American debates on Mexican identity. The novels were openly reviewed by the press in California and Texas, in particular La Prensa of San Antonio and La Opinion of Los Angeles, due to their economic and commercial success.

    Dr. Juan Velasco, associate professor of English and modern languages and literatures Tuesday, October 26, 2010
    5-7 pm  ,Williman Room, Benson Memorial Center

    Dr. Juan Velasco, Associate Professor in the Department of English and Modern Languages and Literatures, teaches courses in contemporary Latin American and Chicano/a Literature, and Film. He received his first Ph.D. in 1992 from the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Spain. His area of specialization was Contemporary Latin American Literature and his dissertation title was: Las diferentes ediciones de "La Sombra del Caudillo" de Martín Luis Guzmán.  In 1995 he received his second Ph.D. from UCLA. His area of specialization was Contemporary Chicano/a Literature and the dissertation title was Labyrinth of Mexicanness: The Construction of Ethnicity in Contemporary Chicano/a Autobiography.  He taught at the University of Kansas, and since 2000 has taught at Santa Clara University.

    This event is sponsored by the College of Arts and Sciences, the Latin American Studies Program,and the Office for Multicultural Learning

    The Mexican Revolution of 1910 represents a milestone in the history of Mexico. As a movement for social justice and social change, the Revolution ended 30 years of dictatorship and established the foundations for modern Mexico. The widespread violence produced a massive migration of Mexicans to the United States. The Revolution inspired literature, music, and art that drew their themes from these historical periods. The aim of this symposium is to celebrate these creative arts.

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

  •  WGST Fall Lunch Lecture

    Aunting- Cultural Practices that sustain Family and Community Life.

    Laura Ellingson, Communication Department
    11:45-1:00pm
    Wednesday
    Oct. 27th 2010

    In this engaging book, Laura Ellingson and Patricia Sotirin construct a consid-eration of "aunts" that moves from noun to verb. "Aunts" is more than a group of people or a role; instead, "to aunt" is a practice, something people "do." Some women "aunt" as second mothers, friends, or mentors, while others play more peripheral roles. In either case, aunts nonetheless significantly impact their nieces’ and nephews' life choices.


    Books will be available for purchase at this event.

  •  Environmental Studies Institute Fall 2010 Seminar Series

    “The Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill and the Precautionary Principle”


    Mike Meyer, Dpt. of Philosophy; Ken Manaster, Santa Clara Law;
    Keith Warner, Religious Studies Dpt. and Director of
    Education for the Center for Science, Technology, and Society


    November 10th 12-1pm in Media Room A of the Harrington Learning Commons


    Co-sponsored by Ethics at Noon & the Ignatian Center

  •  Environmental Studies Institute Fall 2010 Seminar Series

    "Healthy Food Resources Assessment in Santa Clara"


    Aimee Reedy, Doctor of Education (EdD), Master of Public
    Health (MPH) – Health Trust Vice President


    October 29th from 12-1pm in the Kennedy Commons
    Co-sponsored by the Food and Agribusiness Institute

  •  The Department of Anthropology's Seminar Series

    Drs. Michelle Bezanson and Sean Watts,
    and the students from ANTH, ENVS, and BIO,
    Santa Clara University

    27 October 2010
    5:00 – 6:00 pm.
    Kennedy Commons

    “Monkeys, soil, frogs, and sustainability in Costa Rica.”

    Drs. Bezanson and Watts,along with Rochelle Stowe, Megan King, Kyla Moran, Joe O'Brien, Carly Zipper, and Elisa Fanucchi, will answer numerous questions on research in Costa Rica. How does soil vary in different areas of a rainforest? What is it like to climb a rainforest tree?How do capuchin monkeys interact with their environment? Does poison-dart frog behavior vary according to color brightness and intensity of individual frogs? What are the ethical issues of doing research in fragile ecosystems? They will explore these issues using recent research at Estacion Biological La Suerte in Northeastern Costa Rica.

     

  •  Interdisciplinary Seminar

    Dr. Amelia Fuller

    SCU Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry

     

    Monday October 18, 2010

    4-5:30 pm

    Alumni Science 246

     

    Abstract:

    Oligomers of N-substituted glycine, peptoids, have been valuable targets for study and application as potential therapeutics, as nanomaterials, and as organocatalysts. Peptoids can mimic structural and functional properties of natural peptides, and they can be efficiently prepared using reliable synthetic methods. Research in my lab aims to develop new methods to examine the three-dimensional structures of peptoids, particularly those that are similar to protein substructures. We have prepared peptoids that include an environmentally sensitive fluorophore, 4-DMN. The fluorescence emission intensity of 4-DMN varies with the polarity and rigidity of its local medium. Most of our 4-DMN-modified peptoids are predicted to adopt a helical three-dimensional structure, and we have varied the patterning and display of hydrophobic and hydrophilic groups relative to 4-DMN to change its local environment. We find that the fluorescence intensity changes correlate with our predictions about the local polarity and rigidity of the environment of 4-DMN in the context of the peptoid’s three-dimensional structure.

  •  The History of the Mexican Revolution 1910-1920

    The Mexican Revolution of 1910 represents a milestone in the history of Mexico.  As a movement for social justice and social change, the Revolution ended 30 years of dictatorship and established the foundations for modern Mexico.  The widespread violence produced a massive migration of Mexicans to the United States.  The Revolution inspired literature, music, and art that drew their themes from these historical periods.  The aim of this symposium is to celebrate these creative arts.  This symposium launches the 2010-12 diversity theme, Legacies.

    Dr. Ramon Chacon, associate professor of history and ethnic studies

    Tuesday, October 19, 2010
    5-7 pm

    Williman Room, Benson Memorial Center

    If you have a disability and require a reasonable accommodation, please call Marie Brancati at 408-554-2301 or 800-735-2929 (TTY-California Relay) at least 72 hours prior to the event.

    Dr. Ramon Chacon
  •  Environmental Studies Institute Fall Seminar Series

    "Environmental Injustice and Catholic Social Ethics: The Reality of the Issues and the Schope of our Response"

    Kristing Shrader-Frechette, Director of the Center of Environmental Justice and Children's Health - University of Notre Dame

    October 22nd from 1-2 pm in the Saint Clare Room of the Harrington Learning Commons

    Co-sponsored by the Ignatian Center

  •  Mathematics/CS Department Fall Colloquium Series

    Ken McLaughlin of University of Arizona and MSRI will speak on "Random Matrices Beyond the Usual Universality Classes"

    Abstract:
    The statistical behavior of eigenvalues of large random matrices (i.e. in the limit when the matrix size tends to infinity) has been investigated extensively, for probability densities of the form C exp{-Tr V(M)} where V(x) is a smooth, real valued function of the real variable x, and V(M) is defined on matrices by "the usual procedure".


    First goal: provide a background and introduction to the above.

    But for probability densities in which the TRACE does not appear linearly, the situation is less understood. A simple example is: C exp{ (Tr ( M^2))^2} (i.e. square the trace).


    Second goal: explain the source of the complication.

    Third goal: Describe results. (Joint work with Misha Stepanov,
    Univ. of Arizona)
     

  •  The Thing We Do ... An Evening With the Music Faculty

    Center of Performing Arts

    Help kick off the new performing season with the Santa Clara University Music faculty performing some of their favorite music.  Performers include:  Hans Boepple, piano, Claudia Bloom, violin, Liliane Cromer, mezzo soprano, David Flores, percussion, William Harvey, trumpet, Kathleen Ludowise, piano and Nancy Wait-Kromm, soprano.

    Friday, October 1, 2010, 8 pm, Music Recital Hall

  •  The Department of Art & Art History Present Don Meyer

    September 20 - October 15, 2010

    Opening:  Friday, October 1st
      Artist Lecture: 4-5 p.m. in Fine Arts room G
      Reception: 5-7 p.m.

    Art Department Gallery
    Gallery Hours:  Monday - Friday, 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.

    If you have a disability and require reasonable accommodation, please contact (408) 554-5483.
     

  •  Migrations

    Migrations

    Migrations explores the intersecting motion of migrating humans and animals, inspired by the miraculous and courageous journeys of all species that navigate the globe.  In a time of economic stress and global climate change, the concept of migration questions the notion of what is "home".  With music by acclaimed composer Jon Scoville, the dancers will traverse the SCU campus and perfomr three dances on their journey.  Part seer, part bag lady, the "wanderer",  who has seen the pat and senses the future, sings her visios to greet the dancers at each dance site.

  •  The Mexican Revolution in the Arts Symposium

    The Mexican Revolution of 1910 represents a milestone in the history of Mexico.  As a movement for social justice and social change, the Revolution ended 30 years of dictatorship and established the foundations for modern Mexico.  The widespread violence produced a massive migration of Mexicans to the United States.  The Revolution inspired literature, music, and art that drew their themes from these historical periods.  The aim of this symposium is to celebrate these creative arts.  This symposium launches the 2010-12 diversity theme, Legacies.

  •  Volunteer at the Bronco Urban Garden

    Come take break from work, school or just come enjoy a day getting your hands dirty in your local community garden! Every Wednesday and Saturday (weather permitting) from 2-5pm, Corner of Sherman St. and Benton St, for more information email broncourbangardens@gmail.com

  •  Center of Performing Arts 6.1

    Playwright's Workshop

    Enjoy an evening of original one act plays written, performed and directed by Santa Clara University students and alums. New playwrights, who have completed a series of SCU playwriting courses, showcase their work in semi-staged readings.

     

    DATE: June 1, 2010
    TIME: 8:00 PM
    PLACE: Mayer Theatre, Fess Parker Studio Theatre

     

  •  Center of Performing Arts 5.28-6.5

    The Center of Performing Arts is proud to present:

    Thoroughly Modern Millie

    A Tony Award-winning musical,  Thoroughly Modern Millie is a high-spirited musical romp, based on the popular movie that has all of New York dancing the Charleston. Filled with frisky flappers, dashing leading men and a dragon-lady of a villainess that audiences will love to hate, Thoroughly Modern Millie is a perfectly constructed evening of madcap merriment!


    PLACE:
    Louis B. Mayer Theatre
    DATES: May 28-30 & June 1-5, 2010
    TIMES: Tues. - Sat. 8pm, Sun. 2pm


    Contact;
    CPA Box Office
    Tel 408-554-4015
    sbutler@scu.edu
     

  •  Department of Religious Studies 5.24

    The Department of Religious Studies invites you to attend

    "Women Healing Themselves and Healing The World"
    Globalization, Ethics, Solidarity and Gendered Civic Engagement Across Borders: Examples From Santa Clara University And Beyond
     
    Come to learn more about how these issues affect women:
    Globalization
    Immigration and Migration
    Networking across Borders
    Global Health
    UN Millennium Development Goals
    Global Work Place
    Interfaith Dialogue and Quest for Global Peace
     
    Panelists include:
    •Lynette Parker: Faculty Member and Clinical Supervising Attorney, Katherine and George Alexander Community Law Center of SCU School of Law
    •Rev. Rebecca Kuiken: Director, Interfaith Council on Economics and Justice: Working Partnerships USA
    •Dr. Musimbi Kanyoro : Director, Population and Reproductive Health Program, David and Lucile Packard Foundation
    •Sanima Faheem : Founder and Executive Director, American Muslim Voice Foundation
    •Linda Alepin: Founder, Global Women Leadership Network; Lecturer, Leavey School of Business
     
    Sponsored by Office of Provost Undergraduate Studies, Religious Studies, African Studies, and History Department

    WHERE: Williman Room, Benson Center    
    WHEN: May 24th, 6:45-8:45 pm


    Light Refreshments will be served


    If you have a disability and require reasonable accommodation, please call 408-554-4547.

  •  Department of Anthropology 5.19

    The Department of Anthropology’s Seminar Series is pleased to announce the upcoming presentation by Fr. Luis Calero, S.J. Santa Clara University “Essentializing the Enemy: Violence in Colombia.”

     Dr. Calero will explore the emergence and consolidation of a culture of violence which has permeated Colombia during its history. Special attention will be given to the role of recent guerrilla, para-military, and government armed forces as they legitimize their actions on the basis of their own cultural construction of the enemy.

    Snacks and refreshments will be provided.

    Date: Wednesday, May 19. 2010
    Time: 5:00 – 6:00 pm.
    Place: Kennedy Commons

 
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