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Communication News & Events

Communication News & Events

The following postings have been filtered by tag journalism. clear filter
  •  Faculty Feats: Lisa Davis

    Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014

    In the November 2014 issue of California Lawyer, adjunct lecturer Lisa Davis examines the legal landscape of Airbnb, the San Francisco company that connects potential guests online with private lodging in cities around the world.

    “Around the globe, travelers and property owners by the thousands are using short-term rental websites like Airbnb,” Davis writes. “The idea of ‘home sharing’ has zealous devotees: It's often hailed as the only thing standing between hosts and homelessness, as a way to empower the little guy in a corporate world, and as a path to better cultural understanding, one traveler at a time — all of which might actually be true. But home sharing is testing new ground in the courts, local governments, and housing markets. It tests zoning and landlord-tenant laws, as well as the patience of many neighbors, and it is helping to reshape the nation's most competitive housing markets.”

    Davis teaches journalism courses in the Communication Department. She is a freelance writer and author of The Sins of Brother Curtis: A Story of Betrayal, Conviction, and the Mormon Church

    (Illustration by Randy Lyhus, courtesy of California Lawyer)

  •  Faculty Feats: Gordon Young

    Sunday, Mar. 30, 2014

    Writing in Belt Magazine, Senior Lecturer Gordon Young examines what it takes to be an urban homesteader in one of America's "shrinking cities" like Detroit, Cleveland, and Gary, Indiana. He finds that helping revive these once proud cities is not for the faint of heart.

    "If you’re not financially stable, committed to years of hard work, and willing to deal with the frustrations that come with life in a city that used to build things, your psyche and your bank account will take a big hit. And you might end up hurting the very place you were trying to help when you call it quits and walk away."

  •  Life after SCU: Jennifer Zeidan

    Tuesday, May. 14, 2013

    Jennifer Zeidan graduated with a Communication degree in 2009. After more than five years at Cisco TV, she recently moved on as a broadcast engineer to support the development of Al Jazeera America, a new national news network being built from the ground up. "I am excited to be part of this network," Jennifer said. "It's a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity."

    AJAM will be headquartered in New York and have 12 bureaus across the nation, including San Francisco, where Jennifer will be assigned.

    "Thank you for the wonderful education that continues to move me forward in my life and career."

    Work highlights: Al Jazeera America, Cisco Systems, Major League Baseball, JZ Media.

    A few things Jennifer likes most about her work: I continue to be fascinated by my job. It allows me to keep up with the rapidly and continuously changing production technologies and techniques. I am also involved in various stages of production and facility designs, ranging from engineering designs, to on-location studio build-outs, to day-to-day production engineering. The variety keeps my job fresh and enjoyable.

    Why Jennifer majored in Communication: From the moment I stepped foot in the studio and spoke with Steven Lee, then chair of the department, I knew that the Communication Department was the perfect fit. I appreciated the breadth and depth of the curriculum and the variety of classes I could take, everything from Minorities in the Media to Documentary Production.

    The most valuable things Jennifer learned in the Communication Department: I came to appreciate the value of working with a strong team of dedicated, passionate individuals. In the world of production, you are only as good as your team, so being able to work professionally with everyone is a valuable asset. And the value of communication. Though it may be hard to believe, communication – even in a communication department in the business world – is lacking! Santa Clara University’s Communication Department does an excellent job of emphasizing the ability to communicate in order to collaborate and execute tasks effectively in the “real world.”

    Jennifer Zeidan on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/in/jzeidan

  •  Life after SCU: Joe Tone

    Monday, May. 6, 2013

    "The other night, I was sitting in a Thai restaurant in a small Texas college town, talking to a group of graduate students about crafting newspaper stories. It was a scene – me, in Texas, grad students staring at me between spoonfuls of pad thai – that would have been unthinkable to my 18-year-old self.

    "That self knew little more of journalism than the box scores in my morning paper. But then I showed up at Santa Clara, and was welcomed into the Communication Department by professors across all disciplines. Things started firing. Lessons in public speaking got me comfortable on my feet, in front of a room. A foray into visual storytelling prepared me for video's eventual role in digital journalism. Research methods, reporting, writing – the building blocks started to stack up.

    "Late in my time there, I started to crave a chance to use them somewhere beyond the wide avenues and strip malls of my cloistered suburban youth. Chicago, DC, Cleveland, Denver, Kansas City, Dallas: Those building blocks are well traveled now. And at every stop, I've drawn on my experience at Santa Clara, in the classrooms, the halls, the basement of Benson and beyond."

    Dallas Observer website: http://www.dallasobserver.com/news/

  •  Faculty Feats: Gordon Young

    Sunday, Apr. 14, 2013

    After living in San Francisco for 15 years,  Communication Department Senior Lecturer Gordon Young found himself yearning for his Rust Belt hometown: Flint, Michigan, the birthplace of General Motors and “star” of the documentary Roger & Me. Hoping to rediscover and help a place that once boasted one of the world’s highest per capita income levels, but is now one of the country's most impoverished and dangerous cities, he returned to Flint with the intention of buying a house. What he found was a place of stark contrasts and dramatic stories, where an exotic dancer can afford a lavish mansion, speculators scoop up cheap houses by the dozen on eBay, and arson is often the quickest route to neighborhood beautification .

     
    In Teardown: Memoir of a Vanishing City, published in June by the University of California Press, he skillfully blends personal memoir, historical inquiry, and extensive interviews with Flint residents to construct a vibrant tale of a once-thriving city still fighting—despite overwhelming odds—to rise from the ashes. He befriends a rag-tag collection of urban homesteaders and die-hard locals who refuse to give up as they try to transform Flint into a smaller, greener town that offers lessons for cities all over the world. Hard-hitting, insightful, and often painfully funny, Teardown reminds us that cities are ultimately defined by people, not politics or economics.
     
    Teardown was listed on The Atlantic Wire’s summer reading list, and filmmaker Michael Moore described it as “a brilliant chronicle of the Mad Maxization of a once-great American city.”
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