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Arabic Studies at Santa Clara University

Arabic 1 - Elementary Arabic I (4 Units):
This course is designed to introduce students to Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) and the cultures of the Arabic-speaking world. Through the four basic skills of listening, speaking, reading, writing, as well as cultural knowledge, students will acquire basic knowledge and understanding in the writing system, sounds and pronunciation of Arabic letters; writing and reading basic sentences; introduction to Arabic grammar; and building a list of vocabulary in MSA & Colloquial Arabic. Offered in the Fall Quarter.

 

Arabic 2 - Elementary Arabic II (4 Units):
A continuation of Arabic 1 and is designed for students to acquire additional vocabulary, the rules of Arabic grammar, and reading more complex materials. Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) through Al-Kitaab series textbooks will be used to allow students to acquire additional knowledge and understanding in many areas of the Arabic Language. Students in this course are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials that are of more depth and length than those used in Arabic 101. Offered in the Winter Quarter, Prerequisite: Arabic 1 or equivalent.

 

Arabic 3 - Elementary Arabic III (4 Units):
This course is the first half of intermediate Arabic at San Francisco State University. The course is designed for students who have completed at least two semesters of Arabic in an academic setting and or have knowledge of basic grammatical features of Arabic. Students in this course will acquire additional vocabulary, advanced rules of Arabic grammar and verb system, and writing and reading more complex materials with comprehension of case system and sentence structure. Modern Standard Arabic (MSA) through Al-Kitaab series textbooks will be used to allow students to acquire additional knowledge and understanding in the structure of the Arabic Language. Students in this course are exposed to authentic reading and listening materials through lectures, discussions, exercises and communicative language activities. Offered in the Spring Quarter, Prerequisite: Arabic 2 or equivalent.

 

ARAB 21 - Intermediate Arabic I:
This is the first course in Intermediate Arabic and focuses on Reading and discussion of texts dealing with the literature, arts, geography, history, and culture of the Arabic-speaking world. Review of the linguistic functions and grammar structures of first-year Arabic. The teaching/learning process in this level is proficiency-oriented where emphasis is placed on the functional usage of Arabic and communication in context in the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Prerequisite: Arabic 3 or equivalent.

 

ARAB 22 - Intermediate Arabic II:
Continuation of Intermediate Arabic with focus on building additional vocabulary, using Arabic-English dictionary, reading and discussion of  Arabic texts dealing with the literature, arts, geography, history, and culture of the Arabic-speaking world. The teaching/learning process in this level is proficiency-oriented where emphasis is placed on the functional usage of Arabic and communication in context in the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Prerequisite: Arabic 21 or equivalent.

 

ARAB 23 - Intermediate Arabic III:
Continuation of Intermediate Arabic with focus on the grammatical and linguistic structure utilizing additional texts dealing with the literature, arts, geography, history, and culture of the Arabic-speaking world. The teaching/learning process in this level is proficiency-oriented where emphasis is placed on the functional usage of Arabic and communication in context in the four language skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening. Prerequisite: Arabic 22 or equivalent.

 

ARAB 50 - Intermediate Arabic Conversation:
This course focuses on the spoken Arabic dialect of the Levant (Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Palestine) as one of the major Arabic dialects spoken and understood in the Arab World. The course is a combination of lecture, discussion, exercises and communicative language activities. It aims to develop conversational skills focusing on the use of topic- structured drills and activities that are appropriate to the context in which the language will be spoken. Representative examples of colloquial literature, plays, songs, and TV series will be introduced. Colloquial Arabic will be the primary language of instruction.

 

ARAB 137 - Arabic Culture & Identity:
The ethnic and religious diversity of the Arab people and their unity behind a common heritage will be examined through the study of all aspects of Arabic culture and identity.  This course will introduce the students to the major aspects of Arabic and Islamic culture in the context of the complex history of the development of the Arabic world. It will include coverage of religious and ethnic diversity, language, the Arabic family structure, values traditions, and customs. Arabic literatures and poetry from the classical period to the present will be introduced. The Arabic visual and performing arts, music, food, and clothing will be covered. This course is open to all upper-division students who are interested in learning about the Arabs and their culture. This course is taught in English, knowledge of Arabic is desirable but not required.

 

The Art of Arabic Calligraphy
Arabic calligraphy is a genuine Arabic and Islamic art form and it links the literary heritage of the Arabic language with the religion of Islam. It is an artistic tradition of extraordinary beauty, richness and power. Calligraphy means "beautiful handwriting," and in Arabic it also means "the geometry of the spirit." This course will combine theory with practice and through hands-on projects, it will introduce students to the Arabic writing system and the art of Arabic calligraphy. It will also covers the historical development and the origin of the different calligraphic styles, the geometric proportioning of Arabic letters, and the work of Arabic calligraphy masters. This course will be offered in the future.

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