Santa Clara University

mechanical banner
RSS

Mechanical Engineering Seminars

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 3/4/2015

    You are cordially invited to the Mechanical Department Seminar
     
    Speaker: Maclen Marvit, Intellectual Ventures Lab
    Date: Wednesday, March 4, 2015
    Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    Location: EC 326
     
    Title:

    KILLING MOSQUITOS WITH LASERS

    Abstract

    More than 200 million people get malaria every year; over half a million die. One way to break the malaria transmission cycle is to prevent the primary vector, the female Anopheles mosquito, from reaching a healthy host. A team at Intellectual Ventures Lab is developing the Photonic Fence for Bill Gates’ Global Good Initiative. The Photonic Fence is capable of identifying the discriminating characteristics of a mosquito, training a laser on it, and delivering enough energy to kill or incapacitate it. This approach could offer a new tool for mosquito control that works without constant human attention and with no collateral damage to the local ecology. The Photonic Fence could also be used to monitor and catalog the presence of mosquitoes, or other flying insects in a given area of interest. In this scenario, the device might be useful as a passive means of evaluating potential insect repellants, attractants, or other interventions. Outside of malaria eradication efforts, alternative applications for the Photonic Fence could include crop protection against pests or use as a research tool to study insect behavior. A study completed recently investigated lethality using wavelengths in the VIS â NIR at pulse durations that range from nanoseconds (inducing ablative kill) to milliseconds (thermal kill). The study indicates that fluences as low as 1 J/cm² induce 100% mortality on dosed female Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. These findings point to a low power cost-effective lethal laser as a viable option for the Photonic Fence.

    Biography

    Maclen Marvit is the Technology Lead for the Photonic Fence, in charge of designing the system to reduce the incidence of malaria, using commercial off-the-shelf parts. Before working at IV, Maclen worked at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory for several years. After that he started Disappearing Inc, an email start-up, and then worked for Blue Origin, Jeff Bezos' Space Tourism company

     

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 2/25/2015

    Santa Clara University Department of Mechanical Engineering
    Winter Seminar

    February 25, 2015 4:00 PM

    Computers and Aviation

    Professor Antony Jameson
    Stanford University

    Abstract

    This talk traces the parallel evolution of computing and flight over the last 300 years, culminating in a fusion of engineering, mathematics and computing in modern aviation. During the last 50 years, the aerodynamic design process has been completely taken over by computational methods for both structural and aerodynamic analysis. Moreover, engineering drawings have been replaced by computer aided design (CAD) software, which is also used for computer aided manufacturing (CAM). More recently, the dramatic increase in the power of microprocessors has enabled onboard computing to take over critical functions. A prime example is fly-by-wire control, but other examples include computerized navigation systems, engine management systems and collision avoidance systems. Ground based computers also provided the basis of air traffic control systems and airline management and reservation systems. This fusion of computing and flight will achieve its ultimate realization in autonomous unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) such as drones for surveillance and deliveries.

    Biography

    Antony Jameson is the Thomas V. Jones Professor of Engineering in the Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford University, US. He graduated with first class honours in Engineering and went on to obtain a Ph.D. in Magneto-hydrodynamics from Trinity Hall, Cambridge University. Subsequently, he worked as an Economist for the Trades Union Congress, and then became Chief Mathematician at Hawker Siddeley Dynamics, UK. In 1966, he joined the Aerodynamics Section of Grumman Aerospace, in 1974, he moved to the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences at New York University, and in 1982, he joined Princeton University, US, where he was appointed James S. McDonnell Distinguished University Professor of Aerospace Engineering. Amongst his awards are Gold Medal (Royal Aeronautical Society), UK, NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement, Spirit of St. Louis Medal and Elmer A. Sperry Award, US. He is a fellow at Trinity Hall, Royal Society of London, Royal Aeronautical Society, Royal Academy of Engineering, UK and American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. He is also an Honorary Professor at North Western Polytechnic University, Xian, China, Doctor Honoris Causa, Paris VI University, France and Uppsala University, Sweden, and National Academy of Engineering Foreign Associate, US. He has authored and co-authored over 400 scientific papers in a wide range of areas including computational fluid dynamics, aerodynamics and control theory. He is the principal developer of the ‘flo’ and ‘syn’ codes series, widely used in the aerospace industry.

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 2/18/2015

    Santa Clara University Department of Mechanical Engineering
     
    Winter Seminar

    Speaker: On Shun Pak

    February 18, 2015 4:00 PM
    EC 326

    Title:
    Fluid mechanics at small scales: viscous, elastic, and interfacial forces

    Abstract:
    Life under the microscope is significantly different from our experiences in the macroscopic world. Inertial forces, which govern motion at the macroscopic world, become subdominant to viscous forces at small length scales. The absence of inertia imposes stringent constraints on the types of effective locomotion strategies. This also poses a fundamental challenge in designing synthetic micro-swimmers. Interestingly, microorganisms have evolved diverse strategies to achieve propulsion. This talk will first present an overview of the physics and biology of swimming microorganisms, and illustrate how fluid mechanics can be useful for explaining interesting biological phenomena. We will also discuss several examples demonstrating how other forces, such as elastic and interfacial forces, enable motion otherwise not possible at microscopic scales. Potential applications of these ideas in microfluidics and microrheology will also be discussed.

    Bio:
    On Shun Pak grew up and received his education in Hong Kong before coming to the United States for his graduate studies. On Shun received his PhD in Mechanical Engineering at UC San Diego in 2013. He then continued his research as a post-doctoral research fellow at Princeton University, before joining the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Santa Clara University in 2014. On Shun's research interests lie in fluid mechanics at microscopic scales, with an emphasis on problems at the interface of biology and fluid mechanics. He also applies ideas inspired by the biological world to designing engineering systems.

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 2/11/2015

    Santa Clara University Department of Mechanical Engineering
    Winter Seminar

    February 11, 2015 4:00 PM

    Helicopter External Cargo Load Stabilization on the UH-60 Black Hawk - Design and Flight Test at Low and High Speed

    Dr. Christina M. Ivler
    Aviation Development Directorate—AFDD (AMRDEC)
    U.S. Army RDECOM, Moffett Field, CA

    Abstract

    The ability of a helicopter to carry externally slung loads makes it very versatile for many civil and military operations. However, the piloted handling qualities of the helicopter are degraded by the presence of the slung load. Additionally, it can be very dangerous when large swing angles are present due to aerodynamic instability, which often limits the maximum speed of the helicopter when carrying external cargo. This presentation describes novel flight control solutions for improving helicopter operations with externally slung loads, both at low speed and high speed. At low speeds, a task tailored helicopter/slung load control system was designed and flight tested to improve low speed maneuvering and precision load delivery. A high speed, a rotational stabilization control system for the external load was developed and tested in flight to improve aerodynamic stability of the cargo load. Design methods, analytical results, as well as validation flight test results and videos will be shown for the UH-60 Black Hawk helicopter.

    Biography

    Christy Ivler received her bachelor and master’s degrees from UC Davis. She received her PhD from Stanford University. She works as a flight controls researcher/engineer for the U.S. Army Aviation Development Directorate at NASA Ames Research Center.  Christy recently won the Army Research and Development Achievement Award, the highest honor for research and development excellence that the Army awards. Her research interests are in the areas of system identification, flight control design, and handling qualities for rotorcraft applications. She is also an adjunct at Santa Clara University in the mechanical engineering department, and enjoys teaching undergraduate mechanical vibrations and control classes.

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 2/4/2015

    Santa Clara University Department of Mechanical Engineering
    Winter Seminar

    February 4, 2015 4:00 PM

    CFD and Hard Disk Drive Design

    Dr. Andre Chan
    HGST
    (A Western Digital Company)

    Abstract

    With the help of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), we solve some very complex fluid dynamic problems inside hard disk drives (HDDs). The aerodynamics inside HDDs is nontrivial as it involves frictional flow, generated by fast rotating disks, and is further complicated by the presence of non-streamlined obstructions or bluff bodies such as the actuator arm assembly that moves the recording heads in and out radially across the disks. The data-storing disks can spin up to as high as 15,000 revolutions per minute in a high performance enterprise class HDD. The HDD components are therefore subjected to high aerodynamic drag as well as flow induced vibration. With the ever-increasing data density and the ever-falling price in today’s HDDs, it is in the interest of mechanical designers to minimize aerodynamic forces on these obstructions in order to meet servo control requirements needed for recording accuracy, performance and reliability as well as to do so in a cost efficient manner.

    Biography

    Andre Chan is a mechanical engineer at HGST. For over 25 years, he has continuously worked in the disk drive industry at Quantum, Maxtor, IBM and Hitachi GST (which became HGST, a Western Digital subsidiary). He has been responsible for various aspects of disk drive development including design, simulation, test and manufacturability. Over the past 12 years, he has focused much of his efforts to tackle many fluid dynamic challenges in HDDs, such as internal aerodynamics and flow induced vibration of components. He worked closely with Dr. Ferdinand Hendriks in the development of aerodynamic bypass architecture which had led to several successful generations of high performance enterprise class HDDs. He received his B.S. and M.S. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from Santa Clara University. Additionally, he received his M.S. degree in Aeronautics & Astronautics and Ph.D. degree in Mechanical Engineering, with a minor in Aero/Astro, from Stanford University. He continues to stay involved with the CFD research and development in Professor Antony Jameson’s Aerospace Computing Laboratory at Stanford.

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 1/28/2015

    You are cordially invited to the Mechanical Department Seminar

    Speaker: Yanchu Xu
    Date: Wednesday, January 28, 2015
    Location: EC 326
    Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.


    Title: Structural Dynamics Tuning: a Systematic and Practical Approach

    Abstract:

    From a combination of the fundamentals of structural dynamics, experimental modal analysis and modal decomposition, as well as modal synthesis, this seminar introduces an systematic but practical approach on how to use experimental data and simulation to guide structural design for achieving desired dynamic performance.


    Biography:

    Dr. Yanchu Xu is an expert in Noise and Vibration and is currently a Senior Technologist with Apple. He received his B.S. (1981) and M.S. (1984) in Mechanical Engineering from Southeast University in China, and was an assistant professor and head of mechanical design program at Shanghai Institute of Mechanical Engineering before he came to the states in 1991. He received his Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from State University of New York at Binghamton in 1994. With more than 30 years’ experience, he is a multi-discipline expert in structural dynamics, acoustics, electro-magnetics, smart materials, as well as experimental instrumentation.  He has proven track records in various industries from machine tools, automotive, rotary machines, sport equipment, hard disk drives and consumer electronics. During his 15-year tenure in the hard disk drive industry, he developed various creative and effective approaches for structural dynamics characterization and prediction that expedited product development. He can be contacted at yanchuxu@hotmail.com 

     

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 1/21/2015

    You are cordially invited to the Mechanical Department Seminar

    Speaker: Chris Yu
    Date: Wednesday, January 21, 2015
     Location: EC 326
    Time: 4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.




    Title:
    Specialized Bicycle Components

    Abstract:

    With any powered vehicle, particularly ones used in competition, the primary design goals are to increase speed and efficiency for a given amount of energy used. In almost every case, aerodynamic drag is the biggest limitation that must the addressed to reach those goals. This is especially true in cycling where the power source, humans, is relatively weak. In this talk, the role of aerodynamics in the development of cycling equipment as well as in elite athlete body positioning will be highlighted. An overview of the design cycle utilizing Formula 1 level technology, including extensive wind tunnel

    Bio:

    Chris Yu received his B.S. in Aeronautical Engineering at Caltech and M.S. and Ph.D. from Stanford University. He currently leads the Aerodynamics R&D program at Specialized Bicycle Components, a world leader in advanced bicycles and equipment as well as sponsor to numerous elite world-class athletes.

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 1/7/2015

     

     

    Santa Clara University Department of Mechanical Engineering
    Graduate Seminar Winter 2015

    January 7, 2105 4:00 PM,  EC 326

     

    DYNAMIC SOARING

    Ferdinand Hendriks

     

    Abstract

    Dynamic soaring is a form of flight in which propulsion is derived from special flight patterns through non-uniform wind.   Given enough wind shear, Albatross execute high speed, meandering flight trajectories that have been copied by radio-controlled gliders.  Applied mathematical modeling, analysis and numerical computer simulation allow us to understand the essence of dynamic soaring: why high wing loading is preferred for soaring in wind shear and why the mean bank angle is about 55 degrees as observed by early French investigators.  In one math model I show that dynamic soaring in wind shear is analogous to the mechanics of a pumped swing.  Ever since John Montgomery’s era glider pilots have tried to harness the turbulent energy of the wind, called gust soaring.  My analysis suggests that gliders with low wing loading are favored when gust soaring.   

     

    Biography

    Ferdi Hendriks grew up in The Netherlands during the heyday of aviation.   He became an avid model airplane builder and flyer, specializing in F1A class gliders in which he was the 1962 European Champion.  From the Technical University of Delft he received a MS in Aerodynamics and in 1972 from UCLA a PhD in Applied Mathematics and Computer Science from UCLA in 1972.  His Dynamic Soaring thesis pioneered the use of perturbation techniques and numerical methods to study how birds stay aloft without flapping and without a mean vertical wind component, such as an albatross flying through vertical wind shear, and birds and insects with very low wing loading.

     In 1973 Ferdi joined IBM at the T.J. Watson Research Center, where he designed and built micro wind tunnels for high speed ink jet printers.   In 1983 he came to San Jose to help ship the 3380 IBM Hard Disk Drive.  This ignited his interest in air bearings, HDD internal aerodynamics and air filtration.   He wrote IBM’s first finite element air bearing code. 

    He returned to Watson and worked on air bearing sliders with programmable fly height.   He then led a crusade within IBM to give up air bearings with large front tapers.   This class of air bearing sliders is called Tango which has inlet throttled leading edges in which the lift is generated in front and rear pads without “rails.”  In 1991 he received a fundamental patent for HDDs with aerodynamic bypass.

    In 2002 IBM sold its HDD division to Hitachi.   Ferdi joined the new company and worked closely with Andre Chan to implement a revolutionary bypass principle in 15 krpm and small form factor HDD, which saved about 1 Watt in power.  He recently retired from the company after in was acquired by WDC with more than 50 patents.  HGST’s HDDs are arguably the best in the business.

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 3/12/14

    You are cordially invited to the Mechanical Department Seminar Series

    Speaker: Davood Abdollahian
    Date: Wednesday, March 12, 2014

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 (Law Building)
    Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

    Experimental Study of Two-Phase Flow in Microgravity

     

    Davood Abdollahian

     

    March 12, 2014

     

    Abstract

    The increased power requirements of modern day spacecraft require more efficient thermal management methods. In comparison to single phase liquid or gaseous loops, flow boiling systems take advantage of heat of vaporization and can remove considerably larger heat loads. Flow boiling loops can reduce the size and weight of spacecraft and have been considered for application in space based systems.

    A two-phase test loop was designed and constructed to generate reduced gravity data for two-phase pressure drop and Critical Heat Flux (CHF). The experiments were performed during a set of airplane trajectories aboard the NASA KC-135 and DC-9 aircrafts. The test results were used to demonstrate the applicability of the earth gravity models for prediction of reduced gravity two-phase friction pressure drop.

     

    Biography

    Davood Abdollahian has over thirty years experience in thermal hydraulic application and R&D. He worked for over 20 years at S. Levy, Inc. where he conducted research and applied engineering projects in support of nuclear industry. He joined General Electric Company in 2000 and was involved in GE Loss of Coolant Accident and transient analysis. In 2008 he joined Areva, Inc. as an advisory engineer and worked in development of computer models and methodology for accident analysis. He retired from industry in December 2013 and is presently adjunct lecturer at Santa Clara University and San Jose State University.

     

  •  ME Winter Seminar - 3/5/14

    You are cordially invited to the Mechanical Department Seminar Series

    Speaker: Eduardo Chan

    Date: Wednesday, March 5, 2014

    Location: Bannan Hall 142 (Law Building)
    Time: 12:00 p.m. - 1:00 p.m.

     

    P-Version Finite Element Method in Creo Simulate

     


    ABSTRACT

     

     Majority of commercial finite element analysis packages are based on h-version finite element methods. The alternative p-version finite element methods provide several advantages to the traditional h-approach. This presentation will provide an overview of the specific implementation of the p-method in the Simulate module within Creo (formerly known as Pro/ENGINEER & Pro/MECHANICA). A few recent advances in its analysis capabilities will also be covered.

     

    About the speaker:

     

    Dr. Eduardo Chan is primarily interested in finite element methods in structural and thermal problems. For over 16 years, he was a member of the analysis technology group that covers all simulation capabilities of Creo (formerly known as Pro/ENGINEER) and was the technical manager of the group for the last 8 years. Recently, Dr. Chan joined Solar Junction, a solar cell startup in San Jose, as their development manager in charge of all simulation and software needs. Dr. Chan graduated from Caltech with a Ph.D. in Civil Engineering in 1997.