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At the Center

Capturing the lively discussions, presentations, and other events that make up the daily activities of the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at Santa Clara University.

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  •  Improve Your Company's Ethical Performance

    Tuesday, Feb. 4, 2014 3:12 PM

    Registration is now open for "Creating an Ethical Corporate Culture." If you're looking for ways to improve the culture and performance of your company or team, join us for this free online self-paced course, that provides the knowledge and tools to help you create and sustain an ethical corporate culture.

    During this free online course, you'll learn:

    •    4 key approaches to building an ethical organization and culture

    •    10 tools for shaping your culture and keeping it strong

    •    how to anticipate and manage unavoidable challenges to an ethical culture

    •    the proven link between ethics, corporate culture, and business performance

    "Creating an Ethical Corporate Culture" is led by Kirk O. Hanson, executive director, Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, and one of the founders of the field of business ethics.  Kirk and other experts are availabe as a resource to answer any questions, and you'll also benefit from online interaction and discussion with your peers.

    This course can be taken separately, but also serves as a companion to "Business Ethics for the Real World," another Santa Clara University course offered on Canvas Network, with over 1,200 registered since it launched in October. No specific background or preparation is necessary.

     

  •  Helen Alvare on Conscience and the New Catholic Feminism

    Wednesday, Jan. 22, 2014 11:47 AM

    Conscience and the New Catholic Feminism- Thursday February 6th, 7 pm

    Helen Alvare is one of the leading Catholic legal scholars in the United States. She comments frequently on some of the most significant contemporary issues, including the recent contraception and religious freedom debate between Catholic bishops and the Obama Administration. Professor Alvare teaches family law, law and religion, and property at George Mason University. She has written widely on legal matters concerning marriage, parenting, non-marital households, abortion, and the First Amendment religion clauses. A former spokeswoman on pro-life issues for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, she is currently chair of the Catholic Women's Forum, chair of the Task Force on Conscience Protection of the Witherspoon Institute, and an ABC news consultant.

    Join us on Twitter for Live tweeting of this event! Twitter: @mcaenews Event hashtag: #ethicswomen, and #conscienceproject.

    We are fortunate to present this program in part through the generosity of the Project on Conscience in Roman Catholic Thought, funded by Phyllis and Mike Shea. Also sponsored by The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics.

    Location: Arts & Sciences Building, The Wiegand Center, 7 pm

  •  Roy Bourgeois Speaks on Conscience and Consequences

    Monday, Jan. 13, 2014 5:12 PM

    Join us on Wednesday, January 29th, for our first Conscience Project speaker for the winter session. “A Struggle for Peace and Justice: A Story of Conscience and Its Consequences,” features guest speaker Roy Bourgeois, laicized Catholic Priest, and Founder, School of the Americas Watch. Bourgeois has been a prominent voice of conscience within Catholicism for decades. He was profoundly affected by the Vietnam War. In 1972, he was ordained a Maryknoll priest. He then worked among the poor of Bolivia until he was kicked out of the country by its-then dictator. Bourgeois was instrumental in founding the School of Americas Watch, an organization dedicated to shutting down the United States Army's School of the Americas because of the school's alleged training in techniques of repression of many officers of foreign military services. In 2012, he was dismissed by the Vatican from the Maryknoll order because of his support for the ordination of women as priests in the Roman Catholic Church.

  •  Philosophy Conference Highlights 21st Century Virtue

    Tuesday, Jan. 7, 2014 1:01 PM

    “We are what we repeatedly do; excellence, then, is not an act but a habit.” - Aristotle

    Join us this Saturday, January 11th, for this day-long dynamic conference presented by the Santa Clara University Philosophy Department, in association with The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. The theme is: "21st Century Virtue: Cultivating Character with New Technologies." Distinguished speakers include: Charles Ess, University of Oslo; Judith Simon, University of Vienna and Karlsruhe Institute of Technology; John Sullins- Sonoma State University; and Evan Selinger, Rochester Institute of Technology. A wide range of topics will be featured, including:

    • Cultivating Selfhood and Democracy in a Mediated Age: Plato, McLuhan, and the
      Quarrel between the Ancients and the Moderns
    • Trustworthiness and Responsibility: Socio-Epistemic Virtues in a Digital Age
    • Humanity Out of the Loop: Autonomous Warfare and the Diminishing
      Role ofCharacter
    • The Ethical Implications of Detonating a Digital Etiquette Bomb


    Registration includes lunch and coffee. $25 Students $10. SCU Students, Faculty and Staff: Free
     

    RESOURCES

    EVENT FLYER (PDF):

    VIDEO: Digital Age Etiquette: Evan Selinger at TEDxFlourCity
    (Keynoter Evan Selinger presents a 7-minute video on some surprising and yet basic rules of online etiquette)

  •  Doing Right by You

    Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2013 4:43 PM

     It was a very good year, as you can see from the Center's annual report to its supporters, Doing Right by You.  In 2013, the Center developed and began to implement a new strategic plan, which Executive Director Kirk O. Hanson explains in his video message.  Highlights of our year include a new MOOC (Massive Online Course), the creation of several online communities, and the campaign: Give a Child a Book: Build Character for a Lifetime.  The report also provides updates on our online video series on Internet Ethics, our Health Care Ethics Internship, and many other programs.  

    We appreciate all of those who have made contributions to the Center to enable us to do this work.  If you would like to support the Center, you can make your gift online.  

     

  •  Ethics and Marginalized Persons

    Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2013 8:07 AM

    With a Hackworth Research Grant from the Ethics Center, SCU Philosophy Lecturer Brian Buckley developed a new course, “Ethics and Marginalized Persons,” that addressed the importance of personhood regarding people who are disabled, poor, elderly, or gay. The class included both community-based learning and theory.

    In a reflection on a placement at Julian Street Inn, an organization that works with homeless, mentally ill people, one student showed how experiential and theoretical learning combines to impact action.

    When I go to Starbucks for a drink, the way I treat the cashier sets the example for the person behind me in line. When I cut off another driver on the freeway, it sets the example of acceptable driving behavior. Likewise, when I hold the door for a senior, it sets the example that I value them being there and have the ability to slow down for them. We have talked about re-integration, but that is not an easy task. Gough says, “each of us is a role model” (Gough 113). In light of that, the re-integration process is a mission that everyone can impact. By accepting the elderly, by treating them appropriately but without bias, by giving them respect and dignity, I am setting one small but extremely important example. Hopefully, someone will see my example and copy my behavior. It then needs to become a habit for me, and then for him or her, and as this habit spreads so too will the re-integration. It doesn’t need to be the elderly. If I treat any marginalized person as an equal, it will show. It will set an example. That example will spread. Why? We are all human.

  •  Welcome New Student Fellows

    Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 10:37 AM

    Hackworth Fellows

    The Hackworth Fellows are Santa Clara University undergraduates who provide ethics programming for students. They can be reached at 408-554-5319, or by sending an email to hackworths@scu.edu. The Fellowships are made possible by a gift from Joan and the late Michael Hackworth. Read more...

    Nellie Bohac
    Nellie Bohac'14 is a finance and political science double major. She will be expanding the Center's Global Jesuit Dialog on Business Ethics, involving students from Jesuit schools around the world in online conversation about cases in international business. She's also involved in the University's yearbook, The Redwood.
          
    Erin Calister
    Erin Calister'14 is a psychology major and avid yogi and poet. She has been doing research on what factors are associated with an increase in compassion among SCU students, and her Hackworth project will also focus on compassion. She is the current non-fiction editor for the Santa Clara Review literary magazine.
          
    Kori Lennon
    Kori Lennon'14 is a double major in history and women's and gender studies. Her project will focus on ethics in student government. She is public relations vice president for SCU's Associated Student Government.

    * * *

    Honzel Fellow
    The Honzel Fellowship in Health Care Ethics is awarded to an outstanding senior with a passion for ethics as it relates to health care. The Fellow serves as a peer mentor to students in the Center's Health Care Ethics Internship and develops an ethics project with particular relevance to students and alumni.


    Jillian Gerrity
    Jillian Gerrity'14 is a double major in biology and public health. As a Honzel Fellow, she will serve as a peer mentor for the 2013-14 interns in addition to helping the health care ethics team pilot new clinical placements at local hospitals and health care facilities. Outside her fellowship for the Center, she is also working in a Santa Clara biology research lab, which is comparing nationwide data on strains of Neisseria gonorrhea in order to establish more efficient treatment methods and decrease the chance of complete antibiotic resistance.


         

  •  Yes, But Is it the Right Thing to Do?

    Monday, Sep. 30, 2013 4:42 PM

     The Ethics Center is featured in Santa Clara Magazine, SCU's alumni publication, with an article detailing the Center's history and current programs in business ethics, bioethics, government ethics, campus ethics, Internet ethics, and character education.

  •  The Conscience Project

    Friday, Sep. 27, 2013 1:47 PM

     Monday, Sept. 30, the Center kicks off The Conscience Project, a yearlong series of talks exploring our inner moral core as we confront contemporary challenges in science, technology, religion, education, and business.

    The first speaker in the series will be George Lucas Jr., professor of public policy at the Naval Postgraduate School, on robot morality.  Other presenters include Stanford Professor William Hurlbut on stem cells and cloning, Notre Dame Professor Darcia Narvaez on teaching moral character, and SCU Professor Manuel Velasquez addressing the question, "Can a business have a conscience?"

    We are fortunate to present these speakers in part through the generosity of the "Project on Conscience in Roman Catholic Thought," funded by Phyllis and Mke Shea.  

     

  •  Father Thomas Reese, SJ, Portrays Compellingly Simple Pope

    Friday, Sep. 13, 2013 11:40 AM

    Father Thomas Reese, SJ, Markkula Center Visiting Scholar and Senior Analyst, National Catholic Reporter, provided humor, inspiration, and savvy commentary on "all things Pope Francis" during the September 12th Ethics at Noon session, entertaining and informing the lunchtime crowd of 80 attendants.

    What's in a name? Pope Francis is known for his simplicity, love of the poor and of Creation, and as a celebrant of peace and interreligious understanding. Indeed his first actions are best defined as "simple:" paying his hotel bill, refusing to live in the papal apartments, driving a Ford instead of a Mercedes, and washing the feet of prisoners. As Archbishop of Buenos Aires, he cooked his own meals and took the bus over limousines. We can almost refer to him as the "cold call Pope," who is not afraid to make his own phone calls and request a direct connection to "he Jesuit switchboard."

    And yet, Reese's excellent grasp of the Pope's positions reveal complexity behind the simplicity, and a real ability for both Reese and the Pope, to call it like they see it. For example, the Pope's pastoral priorities conjure a church of the heart, that serves as both reconciler and conduit for justice, charity, and love. His priorities for Bishops include increased involvement of women in the church, a rediscovery of "mercy," and a proactive and entrepreneurial mindset.

    Following are additional key soundbytes and questions from the presentation:

    • We are a church of symbols, and this is how we communicate
    • On sexual abuse: zero tolerance
    • Celibacy: "it's a matter of discipline, not faith. It can change."
    • The Appointment of Bishops: they should be close to the people, as well as gentle, patient, as merciful.
      No princes. "Shepherds should smell like their sheep."
    • Denying Communion: One can deny communio to a sinner, "but it's very difficult to check such things."
    • The Church: Are we still capable of warming hearts? "I prefer a church that makes mistakes because it is doing something, to one that sickens because it remains shut in."
    • On The Vatican and Change: Don't make curia officials bishops or cardinals; call for separation of legislative, executive, and judicial power; Vatican needs to become a modern bureaucracy.

    Formerly the editor of America magazine, Reese is the author of a trilogy examining Catholic Church organization and politics on the local, national, and international levels: Archbishop: Inside the Power Structure of the American Catholic Church (Harper & Row, 1989), A Flock of Shepherds: The National Conference of Catholic Bishops (Sheed & Ward , 1992), and Inside the Vatican: The Politics and Organization of the Catholic Church (Harvard University Press, 1997). Reese is a frequent commentator for national news outlets such as NPR, and major news networks.

    MORE: Listen to the podcast here.

    ON TWITTER

    #ethicsreese
    @thomasreesesj