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Ethical Issues in the Online World

Welcome to the blog of the Internet Ethics program at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics, Santa Clara University. Program Director Irina Raicu will be joined by various guests in discussing the ethical issues that arise continuously on the Internet; we hope to host a robust conversation about them, and we look forward to your comments.

The following postings have been filtered by tag identity theft. clear filter
  •  Internet Ethics: Fall 2015 Events

    Tuesday, Sep. 1, 2015

    Fall will be here soon, and with it come three MCAE events about three interesting Internet-related ethical (and legal) topics. All of the events are free and open to the public; links to more details and registration forms are included below, so you can register today!

    The first, on September 24, is a talk by Santa Clara Law professor Colleen Chien, who recently returned from her appointment as White House senior advisor for intellectual property and innovation. Chien’s talk, titled “Tech Innovation Policy at the White House: Law and Ethics,” will address several topics—including intellectual property and innovation (especially the efforts toward patent reform); open data and social change; and the call for “innovation for all” (i.e. innovation in education, the problem of connectivity deserts, the need for tech inclusion, and more). Co-sponsored by the High Tech Law Institute, this event is part of our ongoing “IT, Ethics, and Law” lecture series, which recently included presentations on memory, forgiveness, and the “right to be forgotten”; ethical hacking; and the ethics of online price discrimination. (If you would like to be added to our mailing list for future events in this series, please email

    The second, on October 6, is a half-day symposium on privacy law and ethics and the criminal justice system. Co-sponsored by the Santa Clara District Attorney’s office and the High Tech Law Institute, “Privacy Crimes: Definition and Enforcementaims to better define the concept of “privacy crimes,” assess how such crimes are currently being addressed in the criminal justice system, and explore how society might better respond to them—through new laws, different enforcement practices, education, and other strategies. The conference will bring together prosecutors, defense attorneys, judges, academics, and victims’ advocates to discuss three main questions: What is a “privacy crime”? What’s being done to enforce laws that address such crimes? And how should we balance the privacy interests of the people involved in the criminal justice system? The keynote speaker will be Daniel Suvor, chief of policy for California’s Attorney General Kamala Harris. (This event will qualify for 3.5 hours of California MCLE, as well as IAPP continuing education credit; registration is required.)

    Finally, on October 29 the Center will host Antonio Casilli, associate professor of digital humanities at Telecom Paris Tech. In his talk, titled “How Can Somebody Be A Troll?,” Casilli will ask some provocative questions about the line between actual online trolls and, as he puts it, “rightfully upset Internet users trying to defend their opinions.” In the process, he will discuss the arguments of a new generation of authors and scholars who are challenging the view that trolling is a deviant behavior or the manifestation of perverse personalities; such writers argue that trolling reproduces anthropological archetypes; highlights the intersections of different Internet subcultures; and interconnects discourses around class, race, and gender.

    Each of the talks and panels will conclude with question-and-answer periods. We hope to see you this fall and look forward to your input!

    (And please spread the word to any other folks you think might be interested.)


  •  Internet Access Is a Privilege

    Sunday, Apr. 21, 2013

    What would our lives be like if we no longer had access to the Internet?  How much good would we lose?  How much harm would we be spared?  Is Internet access a right?  These days, whether or not we think of access to it as a right, many of us take the Internet for granted.  In this brief video, Apple co-founder A. C. "Mike" Markkula Jr. looks at the big picture, argues that Internet use is a privilege, and considers ways to minimize some of the harms associated with it, while fully appreciating its benefits.

    In an op-ed published in the New York Times last year, Vint Cerf (who is often described as one of the "fathers of the Internet" and is currently a vice president and chief Internet evangelist for Google) argued along similar lines:

    "As we seek to advance the state of the art in technology and its use in society, [engineers] must be conscious of our civil responsibilities in addition to our engineering expertise.  Improving the Internet is just one means, albeit an important one, by which to improve the human condition. It must be done with an appreciation for the civil and human rights that deserve protection--without pretending that access itself is such a right."