Santa Clara University

Points of Excellence

Grants

 
 

2012-13

College of Arts and Sciences

Rich Barber, Physics, received an additional $20,569 in subcontract funding from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to fund year four of an anticipated four-year grant totaling $95,724. The work funded by this grant involves the study of various highly correlated metal systems using a one-of-a-kind Josephson Scanning Tunneling Microscope (JSTM).

Stephen Carroll, English, received an additional $80,000 in funding from the National Science Foundation to support “Enhancing the Relevance and Effectiveness of Course, Program and Department Evaluation: Improving the Utility and Usability of the Student Assessment of Learning Gains Site.”

Elizabeth Dahlhoff, Biology, received an additional $66,862 from the National Science Foundation to support “Collaborative Research: RUI: Ecological and Evolutionary Responses to Environmental Change in Sierra Nevada Populations of a Montane Willow Beetle.”

Leslie Gray, Environmental Studies, received $25,000 from the Sharks Foundation to support “Bronco Urban Gardens (BUG).” The funds will be used to further develop existing sites while expanding strategically to serve additional areas in need.

David Hess, Biology, received additional funding from the National Science Foundation to support “RUI: Utilization of Natural Variation in Domesticated Strains of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae to Elucidate Metabolic Specialization.” Funds awarded so far total $470,971. He also received a four-year contract from the University of Washington on a NIH prime award that provides $71,712 to support “Genetic Basis of Stress Tolerance in Natural Populations of Yeast.”

Virginia Matzek, Environmental Studies, received an award from the National Institute of Food and Agriculture/USDA to support “Riparian Forests as Ecological and Economic Buffers to Climate Vulnerability in Flood-Prone Agricultural Systems.”

Farid Senzai, Political Science, received $49,130 additional funding from San Jose State Research Foundation/U.S. Dept. of Educ. to support “Consortium for Middle Eastern Studies.”

Brett Solomon, Liberal Studies, received an additional $21,266 UCLA subcontract from the National Institute of Health. Funding will support “Psychosocial Benefits of Ethnic Diversity in Urban Middle School.”

Betty Young, Physics, received year two funding of $39,015 from the National Science Foundation to support the "Cryogenic Detector Work for SuperCDMS and Beyond.” She also received year one funding of $392,027 from The Regents of the University of California and National Science Foundation to support “R&D Toward SuperCDMS at SNOLAB”.

Jesuit School of Theology

To support the role of Catholic women religious in China, India, and Vietnam, the Henry Luce Foundation awarded a four-year grant of $375,000 to the Jesuit School of Theology of Santa Clara University. The grant will fund a pilot program enabling a small group of Catholic nuns to pursue advanced theological degrees at the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley, Calif. Graduates also will receive support from the worldwide network of Jesuit institutions and missions when they return to their home countries.

Leavey School of Business

Gangshu Cai, Operations Management and Information Systems, received $52,826 from the National Science Foundation to support “Collaborative Research on Studies of Multichannel Opaque Service Enterprise” to conduct an in-depth study of multichannel opaque service enterprises, which have uncertain demand and supply.

School of Engineering

Drazen Fabris, Mechanical Engineering, received $89,023 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support “Passive Unitized Regenerative Fuel Cell (PUReFC) for Energy Storage in Off-Grid Locations.”

Tim Hight, Mechanical Engineering, received $50,000 from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and U.S. Dept. of Energy to support “Solar Decathlon 2013: Solar Home 3.0.” This is the first phase of funding of an anticipated two-phase grant for SCU’s participation in the Solar Decathlon 2013.

Shoba Krishnan, Electrical Engineering, received an additional $8,333 in subcontract funding from the University of Minnesota, Department of Energy Prime to support “A Nationwide Consortium of Universities to Revitalize Electric Power Engineering Education by State of the Art Laboratories.”

Hohyun Lee, Mechanical Engineering, received $15,000 from the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to support “Phase Change Material in Automated Window Shades.”

Nam Ling, Computer Engineering, received $60,000 from the Huawei Technologies, Co., Ltd. to support “High Efficiency Video Coding - Next Step.”

School of Law

Angelo Ancheta received additional funding of $27,922 from County of Santa Clara to support the “Unmet Civil Legal Services Program”. He also received $15,066 from the International Institute of the Bay Area to support “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals,” which will help provide legal services toward serving undocumented youth who are eligible for the Obama Administration’s "deferred action” initiative for undocumented youth who were brought to this country as children. He has also received a one-year renewal of $33,533 from the Equal Access Fund of the State Bar of California Legal Services Trust Fund Program; these funds will be used to support the “Consumer Rights Project,” which provides legal assistance to meet the legal needs of low-income individuals, especially limited-English-speaking immigrants.

Colleen Chien received $35,000 from the New America Foundation to support “Startups and Trolls.”

David Hasen received a one year funding of $75,000 from the Internal Revenue Service, Low Income Taxpayer Clinic Program to support the “Santa Clara University Low-Income Taxpayer Clinic” to be run by Colleen Chien at the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center.

Centers of Distinction

Thane Kreiner, Center for Science, Technology, and Society, received an additional $250,000 from the Skoll Foundation to support “Skoll Foundation—GSBI Partnership.” The goals of this award are to develop a resource engine for the Global Social Benefit Incubator (GSBI); create a unified platform to innovate, drive, and scale collective social impact; and share GSBI programmatic learnings, networks, and knowledge.

 
 

2011-12

College of Arts and Sciences

Mike Carrasco and Amelia Fuller, Chemistry and Biochemistry, received $159,159 from the National Science Foundation to purchase a mass Spectrometer for the analysis of peptides and proteins, facilitating faculty research with undergraduates.

David Hess, Biology, received two awards for studying DNA changes in yeast to gain insight into antibiotic resistance in bacteria and the evolution of tissue in cancer: a three-year, $455,971 grant from the National Science Foundation, and $290,140 from the National Institutes of Health as part of a collaborative grant with University of Washington at Seattle and University of Strasbourg.

Amelia Fuller, Clare Boothe Luce Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry, received $349,603 from the National Science Foundation to study organic molecules that mimic protein biomolecular structural features, and develop new research-based modules in organic chemistry laboratory courses.

Chris Weber, Physics, received a three-year, $190,000 grant from the National Science Foundation for testing the density of electronic states in the magnetic semiconductor GaMnAs using a short-pulsed laser.

Justen Whittall, Biology, received two research grants: $191,250 from the California Department of Fish & Game to examine pollination biology and genetic diversity in two endangered, Bay Area flower species, and $272,968 from the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service to reintroduce a viable population of the Metcalf Canyon Jewelflower.

Jonathan Zhang, Bioengineering, received funding of $245,456 in 2012 as part of a five-year grant awarded by the National Institute of Health for research on engineering mammalian cells to synthesize non-natural proteins for studying protein post-translational modification in vivo.

Jesuit School of Theology

Eduardo Fernandez, S.J., Jesuit School of Theology, received $20,000 from the Jesuit Conference, Inc. to support "Social and International Ministries."

School of Engineering

Ahmed Amer, Computer Engineering, received $109,989 from the National Science Foundation to improve the reliability and scalability of data storage systems.

Chris Kitts, Mechanical Engineering, received a $41,000, two-year contract from NASA Ames Research Center to support "Small Spacecraft Division Microsatellite-Nanosatellite Technology Research & Development Support."

Nam Ling, Computer Engineering, received $70,000 from Huawei Technologies, to evaluate cutting-edge, high-resolution video encoding and compression to develop patents and future standards for 3D video.

Dan Strickland, Mechanical Engineering, received $14,907 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support "Regenerative Fuel Cell for Off-Grid Renewable Energy Storage."

Centers of Distinction

The Center for Science, Technology, and Society received funding for two new programs: a $2 million grant from the Noyce Foundation for the Global Social Benefit Fellowship program and $199,983 from the World Bank Development Marketplace to pilot an online Global Social Benefit Incubator (GSBI™) program.

The Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law and the California Innocence Project at California Western School of Law in San Diego have been awarded a second grant of $2.2 million to continue a wide-reaching DNA testing program.

Michael McCarthy, S.J., Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education, received $30,000 from Y and H Soda Foundation to support "Companions in Ignatian Service and Spirituality."

 
 

2010-11

College of Arts and Sciences

Richard Barber, Physics, received additional subcontract funding of $18,797 from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to support "Oxides, Interfaces and Disorder" in 2010. The U.S. Department of Energy provides the funding for this project.  The subcontract award now totals $55,797. He received a $300,000 grant from the Department of Energy for “Oxides, Interfaces, Transport and Disorder”  (2008–09), as well as a SCU sub-award from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory for $19,564. He received a subcontract award from UC Berkeley that  provides $15,857 to support Spatial Instabilities, Homogeneities and Proximity Effects: Highly Correlated Metals. UC Berkeley's award was funded by the  U.S. Department of Energy.

Elizabeth Dahloff, Biology, received an additional $56,768 from the National Science Foundation to support research on the ecological and evolutionary responses to environmental change in Sierra Nevada beetle populations.

Amelia Fuller, Chemistry, in spring 2010, received a two-year grant from Research Corporation that provides $17,500 to support "Efficient Identification of Protein Mimics."

Research Corporation for Science Advancement’s Cottrell College Science Awards were granted to Steve Suljak, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry, and John Birmingham, Physics, in the amount of $75,000 for research on crab neural systems; and to Korin Wheeler, Chemistry and Biochemistry, in the amount of $45,000 for research on human health and the environmental implications of nanoparticles.

Betty Young, Physics, Betty Young, Physics, received $53,096 from National Science to support "Detector Optimization for SuperCDMS and Other Experiments” in 2010. This is year three funding of a three-year award, which totaled $160,109. In 2009 she received supplemental subcontract funding from Case Western Reserve University that adds $89,000 to support “Super CDMS 25 kg Experiment.” The revised award total is $753,169; the National Science Foundation provides the funds for this collaborative award. She received $32,927 from Lockheed Martin to support Aluminum Manganese TES Development for Large Scale Arrays of Microcalorimeters. The Lockheed Martin award is funded by NASA-Goddard. The award with this amendment totals $71,309.

School of Engineering

Silvia Figueira, Computer Engineering, received a $30,000 gift from Datacare Corporation to support her research on Computer Handling of Medical Records in spring 2010. Figueira, JoAnne Holliday and Weijia Shang (computer engineering) received a research grant of $88,939 from Intel on "Mobile Internet Device Benchmark" in winter quarter 2010

Unyoung (Ashley) Kim, Bioengineering, was awarded a Technology Steering Committee (TSC) grant of $38,364 for a fluorescence microscope for undergraduate education and research in the bioengineering program in winter quarter 2010. Kim and her student, Sarah Ghanbari, have been selected to receive a 2010 Clare Boothe Luce Research Scholar Award for $6,978 to support the "Rapid Detection of Multiple Pathogens Using Electrochemical DNA sensor."

Christopher Kitts, Mechanical Engineering, received $80,000 in subcontract funding in 2010 from University of Alaska Fairbanks to support "RETINA: Robotic Exploration Technologies in Astrobiology"; NASA provides the funding for this project, and funding for graduate research assistants is included.

Chris Kitts, Mechanical Engineering, and Ruth Davis, Computer Engineering, received $1,142,000 from the Kern Family Foundation to support "An Undergraduate Education Program in Engineering Innovation and Entrepreneurship." This grant is for a period of three years and the proposed initiatives are organized into several complementary categories that will improve the entrepreneurial mindset within our campus, our community, and the KEEN (The Kern Entrepreneurship Education Network) network.

Nam Ling, Computer Engineering, received $125,500 in funding from Droplet Technology, Inc.in spring 2010 to support "Adaptive Bit-Rate Control for Wavelet-Based Video Coding."

Dan Lewis and Silvia Figueira, Computer Engineering, have received an additional $525,898 from the National Science Foundation in 2010 to support, "Attracting a New Generation of Students to Computing." This amendment funds years two through five of the five-year award; the full award amount is $597,781. Lewis also received a three-year award from the National Science Foundation that provides $102,209 to support An Innovative Approach for Attracting Students to Computing: A Comprehensive Proposal. Santa Clara University, St. Joseph's University, the Colorado School of Mines, Ithaca College and Duke University have received NSF awards to support this collaborative project, which addresses the issues of attracting and retaining more students in computing (especially women and underrepresented minorities) by helping high school teachers learn innovative and effective ways of introducing computing and computer programming.

Nam Ling, Computer Engineering, received $125,500 in funding from Droplet Technology, Inc. in 2010 to support "Adaptive Bit-Rate Control for Wavelet-Based Video Coding." The purpose of this project is to conduct research on adaptive bit-rate control for wavelet-based video coding. In 2007 Ling received a $70,000award from Huawei Technologies Co., Ltd. in fall 2007 to support “A Statistical Motion Vector Coding Model” to conduct research on an efficient statistical model for coding motion vectors for Advanced Video Codecs. Ling plans to incorporate the results into a future video coding international standard.

Wendelin Wright, Mechanical Engineering, received $50,000 from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories in spring 2010 to support “Mechanical Behavior of Amorphous Metallic Foams.” This is year-four funding of a U.S. Department of Energy Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers; the award with this amendment totals $200,000. In 2010 she also received a Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award grant from the National Science Foundation; year-one funding of $115,539 has been provided for her project "Shear Banding in Bulk Metallic Glasses," and CAREER grants typically are funded for five years.

School of Law

Angelo Ancheta received a one-year renewal award of $31,519 from the County of Santa Clara. The funds, received in 2010, will be used to provide legal assistance to low-income immigrants. In 2009 he received a one-year renewal grant of $34,385 from the State Bar of California to support the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center. He also received two one-year renewal awards that provide funding for the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center: the first is a City of San Jose award of $27,539; the second is a County of Santa Clara award of $31,519. He received an award from the State Bar of California that provides $31,056 to support the Workers' Rights Project.

Centers of Distinction

Kevin Quinn received a $30,000 award grant in 2010 from the Y and H Soda Foundation. This is first-year funding of an anticipated three-year award to provide funding for the Ignatian Center's "Companians in Ignatian Service and Spirituality."

 
 

2009-10

College of Arts and Sciences

Marco Bravo, Education, received $46,218 in subcontract funding in spring 2009 from UC Berkeley/ National Science Foundation to support “The Role of Educative Curriculum Materials in Supporting Science Teaching Practices with English Language Learners.” This is year-one funding of an anticipated four-year award.

Michael Carrasco, Chemistry, Michael Carrasco and Thorsteinn Adalsteinsson, Chemistry, received a three-year grant in 2009 of $463,320 from the National Science Foundation to support “MRI: Acquisition of a Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectrometer.” He also received $2,442 in supplemental funding from the National Science Foundation to support CAREER: Combinatorial Neoglycopeptide Arrays: Synthesis and Application Toward Creating Bioactive Peptides Resistant to Proteolysis. The award with this amendment totals $331,162.

Stephen Carroll, English, in 2009 received a three-year award from the National Science Foundation that provides $401,685 to support “Enhancing the Relevance and Effectiveness of Course, Program, and Department Evaluation: Improving the Utility and Usability of the Student Assessment of Learning Gains Site.”

Elizabeth Dahlhoff, Biology, received an award of $95,691 from the National Science Foundation in spring 2009 to support “Collaborative Research: RUI: Ecological and Evolutionary Responses to Environmental Change in Sierra Nevada Populations of a Montane Willow Beetle.” This is year-one funding of an anticipated five-year award.

Leslie Gray, Environmental Studies, received third-year funding of $39,014 from the National Science Foundation in 2009 to support “RUI: Cotton, Poverty and the Environment in Africa.” The award with this amendment now totals $127,981. She also was awarded a National Science Foundation grant; this is awarded to a new faculty member who is most likely to become an academic leader of the 21st century.

Patrick Hoggard, Chemistry, received a three-year award of $65,000 from the American Chemical Society’s Petroleum Research Fund to support “Photocatalytic Dechlorination of Chloroalkanes in Hydrocarbon Mixtures” in spring 2009.

Leilani Miller, Biology, has received $7,400 in supplemental funding from the National Science Foundation to support RUI: Functional Analysis of the C. elegans Winged-Helix Transcription Factor, LIN-31. The funds will be used to support an undergraduate student research effort on the project. Miller also received a three-year, $427,000 award from the National Science Foundation to support “Analysis of LIN-31, a transcription factor with multiple roles in C. elegans development” in 2009.

Guy Ramon, Physics, in 2009 received a two-year award from Research Corporation that provides $43,656 to support “Theoretical Study of Decoherence Effects and Quantum of Spin Qubits in Semiconductor Quantum Dots.”

Craig Stephens, Biology, in spring 2009, received year-two funding from the National Science Foundation to support “RUI: Function of LacI-type Transcription Factors in Caulobacter.” The award now totals $264,670.

Bill Stover, Political Science, was named a senior Fulbright specialist for information technology and conflict resolution in 2009. The grant involves up to five overseas consulting visits in the next five years. He also received a $35,000 grant from the Foundation for Global Community in 2009 for his project and research called Conflict Resolution Simulation Middle East.

Keith Warner, OFM, Religious Studies and CSTS, in spring 2009 received year-three funding of $34,098 from the National Science Foundation to support “Managing Risk in the Public Interest: How Ethics and Values Shape Biological Control Practice and Policy.” The award now totals $105,000. Warner also received second year funding of $34,181 in fall 2007 from the California Department of Food and Agriculture to support “Institutional Aspects of Biological Control.” With this amendment, the award totals $68,096, providing funding for research into the scientific, economic, and policy factors shaping pesticide alternatives in California agriculture.

Chris Weber, Physics, received a two-year award in 2009 from Research Corporation that provides $44,570 to support “Ferromagnetic Exchange in (Ga, Mn) As: Microscopic, Time-Resolved Study by Transient-Grating Spectroscopy.” He also received a Research Corporation Grant of $44,570 for “Microscopic, Time-Resolved Study by Transient-Grating Spectroscopy.”

Justen Whittall, Biology, in 2009 received a $6,000 supplement from the National Science Foundation to support “RUI Collaborative Research IPY: Flower color Evolution in the Arctic: Integrating Genomic Research and Undergraduate Education in Polar Environments.” In spring 2009, received a $6,000 supplement from the National Science Foundation after receiving a $546,050 grant from the National Science Foundation (Co-PI Matt Carlson) for “Flower Color Evolution in the Arctic: Integrating Genomic Research and Undergraduate Education in Polar Environments.”

School of Engineering

The Computer Engineering Department received a five-year National Science Foundation Scholarships in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics grant, totaling $597,781. The grant will provide $10,000 a year for four years to five computer engineering students entering Santa Clara in 2009, 13 students in 2010, 2011, 2012, and eight students in 2013.

Tim Hight, Mechanical Engineering, received a Technology Steering Grant for $22,180 for “Solar Decathlon 2009: Instrumentation and Control.”

Christopher Kitts, Mechanical Engineering receiveda one-year award of $55,000 in spring 2009 from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research to support “IRIS: Intelligent Response Imaging Spacecraft”; this is first-year funding of an anticipated two-year award.

Nam Ling, Computer Engineering, received a one-year, $70,000 grant from Huawei Technologies Co, Ltd. in 2009 to support "Predictive and Decoder-Derived Video Coding Model."

Ed Maurer, Civil Engineering, and Iris Stewart-Frey, Environmental Studies, in 2009 received a three-year, $250,000 grant from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support “Assessing the Impact of a Warmer Climate on Stream Water Quality across the Mountainous Western United States.” Maurer also received a one-year, $50,000 subcontract award from the University of California–San Diego to support “Use of Other Statistical Downscaling Techniques and Hydrological Modeling.”

Yuling Yan, Bioengineering, is one of the three investigators in a multi-investigator proposal “High-contrast imaging of single molecules in live cells” awarded in 2009 by the National Institute of Health for a three-year funding period; she is receiving a total funding of $220,842.

Cary Yang, Center for Nanostructures and Electrical Engineering, in 2009 received $1,328,000 in continuation funding from the U.S. Army to support “Thermal and Electrical Nanoscale Transport.” The award now totals $4,355,998.

School of Education and Counseling Psychology

Ruth Cook, Education, in 2009 received $198,312 from the U.S. Department of Education to support “Preparing Special Educators to be Leaders in the Implementation of Effective Techniques for Supporting Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders.” This is third year funding of an anticipated four-year grant. Funds awarded now total $589,823.

Centers of Distinction

The Ignation Center for Jesuit Education received a $2,000 contribution from the Morgan Stanley Foundation from its Volunteer Incentive Program in 2009. This contribution was granted on behalf of the volunteer efforts of Ignatian Center Advisory Board member, and employee of Morgan Stanley, Michael Hack.

The Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara University School of Law and the California Innocence Project at California Western School of Law in San Diego received a $2.4 million grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to administer a massive DNA testing program. This federally funded Post-Conviction DNA Testing Assistance Program is designed to give indigent California inmates an opportunity to pursue claims of innocence.

 

Amelia Fuller


Fuller

 
Daniel Lewis
POE-140_Grants_Daniel_Lewis

 

 
Michael McCarthy, S.J.
POE-140_Grants_McCarthy

 

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