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FYI - Faculty and Staff Newsletter
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fyi - News for the Campus Community

fyi is the official faculty-staff newsletter for the Santa Clara University community. It is designed to keep faculty and staff informed about campus news and information. It is compiled, written and published by the Office of Marketing and Communications.

  •  Santa Clara University Increases Women's Enrollment in Computing Majors

     

    Santa Clara University has increased the number of women enrolled in computing-related majors by 31 percent over the past two years, a sign of progress that SCU hopes will ultimately be reflected in the computing field as the next generation of computer engineers, computer scientists, and software engineers finish their degrees and enter the real world.
     
    “Having more women students in the computing discipline provides a broader range of backgrounds and perspectives,” said Ruth Davis, Ph.D., SCU School of Engineering’s associate dean for Undergraduate Studies. “Women are great communicators and listeners, and they’re extremely creative, experience life differently, and have different expectations than their male colleagues. Thus, a diverse group of women and men in the computing world can drive innovation.”
     
    Numbers from the U.S. Department of Labor show that in 2009 women represented 58 percent of the professional workforce but held only 25 percent of professional computing jobs. SCU has been trying to change that trend by recruiting more women and working hard to retain the women who enroll in Computer Engineering programs. For example, the School of Engineering created a new degree in Web Design and Engineering that has attracted a larger percentage of women than the Computer Science and Engineering degrees. Computer Engineering’s Associate Professor Silvia Figueira, Ph.D., has implemented a volunteer tutoring program, which aims to boost the confidence of students, particularly women and students from underrepresented groups, who typically have no previous exposure to computing. The University has also increased support for existing women students by taking several of them to conferences and banquets that mentor junior women, inspire them, and provide networking and professional development opportunities.
     
    SCU also offers a special luncheon for women in computing majors on the first day of finals each term where they socialize, exchange experiences, and form an ad hoc support group. The School of Engineering also celebrates all female engineering students at a “Women in Engineering” dinner every fall. Both of these events connect students from different years and aim to have older students inspire younger ones.
     

    Women students can always turn to any of the hundreds of women faculty at SCU for advice on everything from academics to careers. Forty percent of the University’s faculty are women, and the School of Engineering has the highest percentage of women faculty (tenured or tenure track) in the U.S., a distinction it’s held for several years.

     

  •  FYI Exclusive: One on One with Dennis Jacobs

    Dennis Jacobs was relieved to leave his snow shovels behind in South Bend, Ind. It will be no clear path for Santa Clara University’s new provost and vice president for academic affairs, however, as he tackles priorities including keeping the school affordable, increasing diversity, and overseeing all five schools.
     
    According to Jacobs, perhaps the most difficult part of his job will be finding a balance between academic advancement and staying within the financial reach of students.
     
    “The greatest challenge is working to make a Santa Clara education more affordable, which is a high priority and deep concern in these difficult economic times, while identifying ways to advance the University in significant ways,” he said. “Achieving this balance requires one to allocate funds strategically in support of the highest priorities.”
     
    Jacobs, who had been working at Notre Dame since 1988, has his work cut out for him in his new position in other ways as well. He is not only responsible for overseeing SCU’s five schools, but also all undergraduate and graduate educational programs and curricula. Jacobs also commented that the University is already constantly advancing through its many programs and initiatives.
     
    “It is energizing to discover the many innovative and transformative programs already underway at Santa Clara,” Jacobs said. “As provost, I have the opportunity to work with an outstanding team of academic leaders in shaping the future. We work strategically to create the conditions where the next set of high-priority initiatives can blossom and flourish.”
     
    Some of Jacobs goals for the year start with getting to know the faculty, staff, students, and campus culture of Santa Clara and spread to following through with the strategic plan.
     
    “This year, I will be working with the college, schools, centers, and various divisions to develop unit-specific implementation plans that will help us reach the institution’s ambitious goals,” Jacobs said. “Another important objective for the year will be to search for and successfully appoint two superb deans and a librarian. I am also eager to work with the Council on Inclusive Excellence to enrich the diversity of Santa Clara’s students, faculty, and staff.”
     
    However, Jacobs would like to see some other goals scored too. Last year, while working at the University of Notre Dame, Jacobs was lucky enough to see their women’s soccer team win the NCAA national championship. He comes to SCU with similar hopes, wishing the team the best of luck.
     
    On a personal level, Jacobs is happy to be back in the Bay Area.
     
    “Twenty-five years ago my wife and I got married just 14 miles away from Santa Clara,” he said. “We are excited to be returning to the Bay Area.”
     
    FYI wishes you and your wife a very happy 25th anniversary.

  •  Grants, Awards, and Publications

     

    Rose Marie Beebe (Modern Languages and Literatures) received the President’s Special Recognition Award.
     
    Jerry Burger (Psychology) received the Dr. David E. Logothetti Teaching Award at the College of Arts and Sciences Convocation.
     
    Elsa Chen (Political Sciene) received the President’s Special Recognition Award.
     
    Ruth Cook (Education) has received $195,994 from the U.S. Department of Education to support “Preparing Special Educators to be Leaders in the Implementation of Effective Techniques for Supporting Children and Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorders.”
     
    Kari Craighead (Modern Languages and Literatures) received the Nancy Keil Service Excellence Award at the College of Arts and Sciences Convocation.
     
    Jane Curry (Political Science) received the President’s Special Recognition Award.
     
    Andre Delbecq (Management) received the University Award for Sustained Excellence in Scholarship.
     
    Andre Delbecq (Management) received the President’s Special Recognition Award.
     
    Kelly Detweiler (Art and Art History) received the Professor Joseph Bayma, S.J., Scholarship Award at the College of Arts and Sciences Convocation.
     
    Laura Ellingson (Communication) won a $4,432 Hackworth Research Grant from the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics for a project called "Voices of Survivorship: Using Photovoice to Explore the Experiences of Long-Term Survivors of Cancer."
     
    Amelia Fuller (Chemistry) has received additional funding from Research Corporation that provides $17,500 to support "Efficient Identification of Protein Mimics."
     
    Jonathan Fung (Communication) received a Faculty-Student Research Assistance Program Grant.
     
    Sara Garcia (Education) has been selected for a Fulbright Specialist grant in Education at Cundinamarca Higher School University, Colombia.
     
    Jim Grainger (Biology) received the Dr. John B. Drahmann Advising Award at the College of Arts and Sciences Convocation.
     
    Leslie Gray (Environmental Studies) received the Bernard Hubbard, S.J., Creative Collaboration Award at the College of Arts and Sciences Convocation.
     
    Tim Hight (Mechanical Engineering) has received $15,000 subcontract funding from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Dept. of Energy to support "Reduction of Energy Use in Electric Clothes Dryers."
     
    Thane Kreiner (Center for Science, Technology, and Society) has received $340,000 from the Skoll Foundation to support "Skoll Foundation - GSBI Partnership."   This is the first year funding of a three-year grant.
     
    Hohyun Lee (Mechanical Engineering) has received $14,995 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support "Enhanced Solar Thermal Energy Harvest for Power Generation from Brayton Cycle."
     
    Hohyun Lee (Mechanical Engineering) has received $20,000 subcontract funding from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory/Dept. of Energy to support "Max Tech and Beyond: Ultra - Low Energy Use Appliance Design Competition."
     
    Dan Lewis (Computer Engineering) has received $851,779 from the National Science Foundation to support “New GK-12: A Symbiotic Exploration of Computer Science in High School Classrooms.”
     
    Fabio Lopez-Lazaro (History) received the University Award for Recent Achievement in Scholarship
     
    Virginia Matzek (Environmental Studies) has received $21,035.20 from The Nature Conservancy to support "Do Sustainability Certifications and Green Labels Deliver Conservation Benefits?"
     
    Leilani Miller (Biology) received the President’s Special Recognition Award.
     
    Susan Parker (Accounting) received the President’s Special Recognition Award.
     
    Chuck Powers (Sociology) received the Louis and Dorina Brutocao Award for Teaching Excellence.
     
    Rebecca Schapp (de Saisset Museum) has received $10,000 from the National Endowment for the Arts to support "California History Community Education and Family Day Workshops."
     
    Brett Solomon (Liberal Studies) has received an additional $24,808 UCLA subcontract from the National Institute of Health. Funding will support "Psychosocial Benefits of Ethnic Diversity in Urban Middle School."
     
    Craig Stephens (Biology) received the Louis and Dorina Brutocao Award for Curriculum Innovation.
     
    Beth Van Schaack (Law) received the President’s Special Recognition Award.
     
    Mike Whalen (Communication) received a $3000 Bannan Visitors Grant from the Ignatian Center to bring three documentary filmmakers to campus this fall.  Mike also won a Technology Innovation Grant for $17,500 that helped the department upgrade to high-definition, tapeless cameras.
     
    Gordon Young (Communication) won a $3,000 Hackworth Research Grant from the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics for his forthcoming book, Teardown: Memoir of a Shrinking City.
     
    These announcements are from September. October announcements will be published in the next issue on Nov. 15. If you have any announcements you would like to submit, e-mail scufyi@scu.edu by Nov. 8.

     

  •  SCU Makes Top 10 List of Higher Education Institutions with Largest Solar Photovoltaic Installations

     

    The Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE) unveiled a new database, naming SCU as having one of the largest roof-mounted photovoltaic installations in the U.S.
     
    SCU has 1,050 kilowatts of solar panels on four of its buildings, making it the third largest roof- top system among all American colleges and universities. The system generates 1.5 million kilowatt-hours of clean energy and eliminates 511 metric tons of carbon dioxide annually. That’s equivalent to taking 127 small cars off the road for an entire year. Among the many initiatives it’s launched, SCU has been adding more solar panels to help the University reach its goal of becoming carbon neutral by 2015.
     
    The AASHE Campus Solar Photovoltaic Installations database found that converting to solar energy is becoming easier for higher education institutions like SCU because of a 40 percent drop in installation costs over the past four years and new financing mechanisms to hedge against rising electricity prices. The data also revealed that installed solar capacity jumped 450 percent over the past three years in the higher education sector. Furthermore:
    • The 137 megawatts (MW) of solar capacity installed on higher education campuses to date is equivalent to the power used by 40,000 U.S. homes.
    • The market in 2010 for on-campus solar installations was over $300 million in the U.S.
    • Higher education solar installations in 2010 made up 5.4 percent of the total 956 MW installed that year in the U.S.
    • Since 2009, the median project size has grown six-fold.
    • Only five states installed more solar in 2010 than the 52 MW installed on U.S. campuses in 2010.
     
    Charts and additional analysis from AASHE are available here
     
    Learn more about Santa Clara University’s sustainability efforts here.

     

  •  FYI Exclusive: Catching Up with Chancellor William Rewak, S.J., 22 Years Later

    Maintaining a garden is not an easy task. However, after some careful tending and determination, one man’s hard work can result in a robust and thriving garden.
     
    Forty-one years after he began “gardening” Santa Clara University, former president William Rewak, S.J., returned as the new chancellor. Rewak, who served as president for 12 years, planted the foundation that has allowed Santa Clara to thrive. Of his many accomplishments, he is best known for his work rerouting the Alameda around campus, spearheading a $50 million fundraising campaign, overseeing the creation of the Eastside Project (now the Arrupe Partnerships), and even unifying the look of the University by having all buildings painted the same tan hue.
     
    “I arrived here in 1970 to teach. Since then, the most obvious change has been growth: the campus has burgeoned—in quantity and quality,” Rewak said. “We see larger and better qualified student body, faculty, and administration, much more professionalism on all levels, a wider breadth of academic studies and opportunities, and many more buildings. I would say that beginning with Fr. Pat Donohoe’s tenure as president in the 60s—he was a catalyst in many ways—Santa Clara has blossomed and has joined the rank of world-class universities.”
     
    The campus is still growing and facing challenges. However, according to Rewak, challenges keep the imagination alive. As chancellor, he is challenged to represent the University’s strategies while maintaining the spirit of Christianity.
     
    “The most challenging aspect as chancellor, and this is true for anybody speaking or acting on behalf of the University, is to represent it fairly, be knowledgeable about the University’s plans and strategies, and especially to make sure that the original vision of Ignatius Loyola—that all of our work and service be consciously motivated by the love of Jesus Christ—always infuse our presentations, always be at the forefront of our imagination,” he said.
     
    In his new position, Rewak has several responsibilities ranging from representing the president at public events to pulling together a campus art committee. Among these tasks, he works to keep former trustees involved with the University, chairs the nomination of commencement speaker and honorary degree recipients, and helps promote University relations.
     
    When Rewak isn’t busy on campus, he’s absorbed in novels by James Lee Burke or Michael Connelly.
     
    “I’m addicted to mystery novels, to thrillers,” he said. “I think it’s because I like puzzles, and I’m gratified to find a solution to the puzzle. I like neat, morally satisfying endings, and mystery stories are the most moral of all stories because, usually, the bad guy loses and the good guy wins.”
     
    If you’re lucky enough, you might spot Rewak at the ice rink, watching the Broncos win.
     
    “I really enjoy ice hockey,” Rewak said. “I like to watch it, I like even better to play it—though at my age I stick to watching.”
     
    While SCU Club Hockey did not exist the last time Rewak was working on campus almost 22 years ago, there are still elements of the University that have not changed.
     
    “It’s still a beautiful jewel-like campus, isn’t it?” Rewak said. “What has remained the same is the vision: it has to be articulated for new generations and in new circumstances, but we are all branches of the Ignatius tree.”

  •  Engineering Students Gear Up for 2013 Solar Decathlon

    Santa Clara University’s Solar Decathlon team is a lot like the bamboo they often work with: just when you think they’re gone, they come back in full force.
     
    Since its commencement in 2002, the biennial U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon has become an internationally recognized competition that challenges 20 universities and colleges from around the world to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. Teams have to win a spot to participate through a proposal process that filters the playing field to the 20 top competitors.
     
    SCU won third place two consecutive times in 2007 and in 2009. The University chose to opt out of the 2011 competition, but SCU students still traveled to Washington, D.C., to observe what the 2011 teams have created. Their eyes are set on 2013, which kicks off with a proposal deadline of Nov. 10.
     
    Engineering students Gyllermo Gallardo ’13, Jake Gallau ’13, Dane Kornasiewicz ’13, Kendra Lane ’14, Teddy Tortorici ’14, and Jay Dubashi ’15 represent the makings of SCU’s intrepid 2013 Solar Decathlon team, however, they are by no means going to tackle the project alone. Several additional students who were unavailable for this interview are expected to join the team, many of whom were enrolled in the Solar Home Design and Analysis class last spring. In this class, students began the early planning process for the 2013 solar-powered house.
     
    Experience gained from this class seems to be providing the group with extra motivation. Whether they’re focusing on using bamboo as structural support or sending a research team to Shanghai to explore different solar panels, this 2013 squad seems to be pulling all the stops in their quest to build a frontrunner home.
     
    Success will also require adaptability, as the decathlon is constantly changing.
     
    “When it first started, the competition was almost completely an engineering one. Now it has become more about sustainability,” said Gallau. “It has become more general about design and power, and has focused more on architecture than engineering. That’s going to be tough since we aren’t an architecture school.”
     
    To tackle this issue, the team looks to bring in students from the art department, who can focus more on the architectural side to building a sustainable home as opposed to the engineering aspects. Doing so can only help, especially considering that this time, SCU stands alone. In 2009, the school created Team California by joining forces with California College of the Arts.
     
    The team’s focus also differs from previous years.
     
    “The whole process is really a linear progression. The first house, Ripple, was about education. The second, Refract, was about livability, luxury, and design,” Tortorici said. “Now, the third house should be about affordability and accessibility. It should be so that everybody across the middle class can afford it. It’s about balance, simplicity, and form.”
     
    To promote affordability, the decathlon team aims to cap their spending at $300,000. Upcoming contest rules state that teams who spend less than $250,000 get a full 100 points in the affordability category. However, teams still get 90 points for spending below $350,000. This proves to be a more realistic and balanced goal, considering that Team California spent between $450,000–$650,000 in 2009, an overall competition average.
     
    While remaining realistic and balanced, the decathlon team possesses a strong desire to shock their opponents that stems from SCU’s 2007 Cinderella team. Santa Clara’s first decathlon team surprised their opponents when they placed third after a late start in the competition. Originally, the squad was denied one of the 20 competing spots and could only participate after another team had withdrawn. In 2009, SCU repeated its third place feat, destroying any notions of beginner’s luck and showing the competition SCU was there to stay. So what about 2013?
     
    “We’ve been so close the last couple of years, we really want to win,” said Kornasiewicz. “I think we can do it. I think we can win.”
     
    As the saying goes, third times a charm.

  •  Grants, Awards, and Publications

    Angelo Ancheta (Law) received funding of $19,529 from The State Bar of California Legal Services Trust Fund Program to support the "Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center."
     
    Katerina Bezrukova's (Psychology) research, "Out of reach: Examining group faultlines in virtual teams," received an award for Outstanding Conference Poster at the INGRoup conference in Minneapolis, MN.
     
    Marco Bravo (Education) received an additional $48,403 in subcontract funding from UC Berkeley/NSF to support "R&D: The Role of Educative Curriculum in Supporting Science Teaching Practices with English Language Learners."
     
    Amelia Fuller (Chemistry) received a five year award from the National Science Foundation that provides $349,603 to support "CAREER: Expanding the Structural Complexity and Functional Repertoire of Sequence-specific Polyamide Oligomers."
     
    Chris Kitts (Mechanical Engineering) received additional funding from NASA Ames Research Center that provides $98,300 to support "Small Spacecraft Division Microsatellite-Nanosatellite Technology Research & Development Support." This brings total funding for this project to $139,300.
     
    Shoba Krishnan (Electrical Engineering) received an additional $8,333 in subcontract funding from the University of Minnesota’s Department of Energy Prime to support "A Nationwide Consortium of Universities to Revitalize Electric Power Engineering Education by State of the Art Laboratories."
     
    Shoba Krishnan (Electrical Engineering) received $10,000 from the Stevens Institute of Technology to support "2011 Engage Mini-Grant."  
     
    Dale Larson (Psychology) will be a key participant in the Hospice Foundation of America webcast “Beyond Kübler-Ross: New Perspectives on Death, Dying and Grief” in November.
     
    Helen Popper (Economics) received $3,101 from the University of Surrey to support "The Stability of Exchange Rate Regimes."
     
    Dan Strickland (Mechanical Engineering) received $14,907 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to support "Regenerative Fuel Cell for Off-Grid Renewable Energy Storage."
     
    Keith Warner (Religious Studies) received $39,543 subcontract from University of California, Riverside/Department of Food and Agriculture prime to support "Biological Control of Arthropod Pests in California Agriculture: Future Prospects with Special Emphasis on its Role in Managing Invasive Species." 
     
    These announcements are from August. September announcements will be published in the next issue on Nov. 1. If you have any announcements you would like to submit, e-mail scufyi@scu.edu.

  •  Santa Clara University Mourns Death of Engineering Professor

    Hundreds of students, faculty, staff, friends, and family gathered to celebrate and honor Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Daniel Strickland, who died in a car accident on Sept. 23. They poured into Mission Church on Sept. 28 to share touching moments and listen to inspiring and at times humorous stories about him.

     
    The 27-year-old professor’s life was cut short by a car crash on Sept. 22. He was driving southbound on 280 just north of Alpine Road, when he hit a deer, damaging his car. Before emergency vehicles could arrive, another vehicle crashed into his. He died the following day.
     
    Although Strickland has been teaching at Santa Clara University for just one year, he was admired and respected by his colleagues and loved by his students.
     
    “Not only is Professor Strickland extremely intelligent, but he’s also one of the most hardworking individuals I know,” said Ross Pimentel ’12 at the memorial service. “Dan, you’re a great teacher and friend. We miss you, I really miss you, and we’ll always love you.”
     
    With a bachelor’s degree from Seattle University and a master’s and Ph.D. from Stanford University, Strickland joined Santa Clara University’s School of Engineering in 2010 to teach classes in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics. His research interests were in affordable energy conservation with particular emphasis on mass transport and innovative fabrication processes in electrochemical systems.
     
    Strickland was proud to be a part of Santa Clara University and its mission, particularly in serving the poor and benefiting society. Among his many contributions to Santa Clara during his short time here, he served as a faculty advisor on senior design projects and was named a Roelandts Fellow with SCU’s Center for Science, Technology and Society. Beloved by his students and colleagues alike, Strickland had a passion for Santa Clara, a commitment to Jesuit education, and dedication to student learning.

    A scholarship fund has been established in memory of Strickland. Donations can be sent to:
     
    Santa Clara University
    Development Office, Gift Processing Department
    Daniel Strickland Scholarship Fund
    500 El Camino Real
    Santa Clara, CA 95053
     
    Notes of condolences may be sent to:
    Kerry Strickland (mother) and her partner Shawn Hays
    Rick Strickland (father)
    P.O. Box 1946
    Vancouver, WA 98668

     

  •  U.S. News & World Report, Princeton Review, Forbes Ranks Santa Clara Among the Best

     

    Santa Clara University made three of the country’s most well-known colleges lists.
     
    In its annual ranking, “America’s Best Colleges 2012,” U.S. News & World Report ranked SCU second overall among master’s universities in the West. SCU’s average undergraduate graduation rate of 85 percent was the third highest in the country among 626 national master’s level universities. Read more.
     
    For a fourth consecutive year, SCU climbed higher on Forbes magazine’s Best Colleges list, jumping to No. 67 for 2011. SCU was ranked 115 in 2010, 150 in 2009, and 318 in 2008. In 2011’s West Coast division, SCU ranked No. 11 and No. 60 in best private colleges. Read more.
     

    The Princeton Review’s annual guidebook, “The Best 376 Colleges – 2012 Edition,” also featured SCU, recognizing it for its academic program, small class sizes, and Catholic values.

     

  •  Santa Clara University's School of Engineering Celebrates 100 Years

     

    Santa Clara University’s School of Engineering will celebrate its 100th anniversary this academic year with a series of events, including visits from industry leaders such as Intel’s President and CEO Paul Otellini and Apple’s Co-founder Steve Wozniak, as well as a look into the future to examine how engineering will change in the next 100 years.
     
    Much has changed since 1911, when SCU’s new engineering program began with just five students enrolled as undergraduate engineering students. Today, more than 1,600 students are studying civil, computer, electrical, and mechanical engineering, as well as bioengineering, applied mathematics, and engineering management and leadership.
     
    Throughout the last 100 years, the School of Engineering has made significant contributions to the community and the world, including helping to rebuild the Mission Church in 1926 after it burned down and providing engineering and science and management training for people in war industries during World War II. For decades, SCU has been leading the way to a sustainable future with alternative fuel research in the 1970s and recent successes in the 2007 and 2009 U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon competitions. SCU is also the only university in the U.S. to do all mission operations and ground segment development for NASA satellites as part of a student program. Read more.

     

  •  Santa Clara University School of Law Welcomes New, Diverse Class of Law Students

     

    Santa Clara University School of Law welcomed its newest class of first-year students to the 100-year-old institution.  
     
    The 226 full-time and 75 part-time students, who began classes on August 15, hail from 26 states and 11 foreign countries including Canada, China, Mexico, and Pakistan. They attended 111 different undergraduate schools, and 36 of them already have advanced degrees— including three Ph.D.s and one DDS (Doctor of Dental Surgery). 
     

    “We are excited to welcome our newest Santa Clara Law class to campus,” said Santa Clara Law Dean Donald Polden. “While they sought us out for our rigorous legal education and leadership focus, we look forward to benefiting from their excellent academic achievements and their rich and varied personal experiences and backgrounds.” Read more.

     

  •  Class of 2015 Launch College Career

     

    Santa Clara University’s campus is bustling with some 1,300 freshmen, who embarked on their college career today. For a fifth consecutive year, SCU received a record number of applicants—13,342, an increase of about 12 percent from the year before. Of the 1,275 students who were admitted, 61 percent are from California, 37 percent are from 37 states and 1.6 percent are international students, representing countries such as China, India, and Canada. Besides California, the next top 10 states with the most students are: Washington (123), Oregon (63), Colorado, (47), Hawaii (39), Illinois (25), Massachusetts (21), Arizona (20), Nevada (17), and Texas (15).
     
    Here’s a look at how the numbers for the class of 2015 compare in recent years:
     
     
    Class of 2015
    Class of 2014
    Class of 2013
    GPA
    3.6
    3.6
    3.55
    SAT (critical reading + math)
    1256
    1254
    1220
    ACT (composite)
    28
    28
    27
    Male/Female ratio
    51%/49%
    50%/50%
    47%/53%
    College of Arts & Sciences
    58%
    57%
    59%
    Leavey School of Business
    29%
    22%
    27%
    School of Engineering
    14%
    21%
    14%
    Californian
    61%
    60%
    59%
    International
    1.6%
    2.6%
    1.9%
    Jesuit high school graduate
    12%
    12%
    11%
    Other Catholic high school graduate
    25%
    24%
    23%
    Public high school
    50%
    48%
    48%
    Legacy (parent)
    12%
    10%
    9%
     
    The freshman students moved into their dorms on Sept. 17, while more than 400 upperclassmen moved into the University’s first eco-friendly student housing community, University Villas. Read more.

     

  •  Engineering Students Gear Up for 2013 Solar Decathlon

    Santa Clara University’s Solar Decathlon team is a lot like the bamboo they often work with: just when you think they’re gone, they come back in full force.

    Since its commencement in 2002, the biennial U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon has become an internationally recognized competition that challenges 20 universities and colleges from around the world to design, build, and operate solar-powered houses that are cost-effective, energy-efficient, and attractive. Teams have to win a spot to participate through a proposal process that filters the playing field to the 20 top competitors.
     
    SCU won third place two consecutive times in 2007 and in 2009. The University chose to opt out of the 2011 competition, but SCU students still traveled to Washington, D.C., to observe what the 2011 teams have created. Their eyes are set on 2013, which kicks off with a proposal deadline of Nov. 10.
     
    Engineering students Gyllermo Gallardo ’13, Jake Gallau ’13, Dane Kornasiewicz ’13, Kendra Lane ’14, Teddy Tortorici ’14, and Jay Dubashi ’15 represent the makings of SCU’s intrepid 2013 Solar Decathlon team, however, they are by no means going to tackle the project alone. Several additional students who were unavailable for this interview are expected to join the team, many of whom were enrolled in the Solar Home Design and Analysis class last spring. In this class, students began the early planning process for the 2013 solar-powered house.
     
    Experience gained from this class seems to be providing the group with extra motivation. Whether they’re focusing on using bamboo as structural support or sending a research team to Shanghai to explore different solar panels, this 2013 squad seems to be pulling all the stops in their quest to build a frontrunner home.
     
    Success will also require adaptability, as the decathlon is constantly changing.
     
    “When it first started, the competition was almost completely an engineering one. Now it has become more about sustainability,” said Gallau. “It has become more general about design and power, and has focused more on architecture than engineering. That’s going to be tough since we aren’t an architecture school.”
     
    To tackle this issue, the team looks to bring in students from the art department, who can focus more on the architectural side to building a sustainable home as opposed to the engineering aspects. Doing so can only help, especially considering that this time, SCU stands alone. In 2009, the school created Team California by joining forces with California College of the Arts.
     
    The team’s focus also differs from previous years.
     
    “The whole process is really a linear progression. The first house, Ripple, was about education. The second, Refract, was about livability, luxury, and design,” Tortorici said. “Now, the third house should be about affordability and accessibility. It should be so that everybody across the middle class can afford it. It’s about balance, simplicity, and form.”
     
    To promote affordability, the decathlon team aims to cap their spending at $300,000. Upcoming contest rules state that teams who spend less than $250,000 get a full 100 points in the affordability category. However, teams still get 90 points for spending below $350,000. This proves to be a more realistic and balanced goal, considering that Team California spent between $450,000–$650,000 in 2009, an overall competition average.
     
    While remaining realistic and balanced, the decathlon team possesses a strong desire to shock their opponents that stems from SCU’s 2007 Cinderella team. Santa Clara’s first decathlon team surprised their opponents when they placed third after a late start in the competition. Originally, the squad was denied one of the 20 competing spots and could only participate after another team had withdrawn. In 2009, SCU repeated its third place feat, destroying any notions of beginner’s luck and showing the competition SCU was there to stay. So what about 2013?
     
    “We’ve been so close the last couple of years, we really want to win,” said Kornasiewicz. “I think we can do it. I think we can win.”
     
    As the saying goes, third times a charm.
  •  Grants, Awards, and Publications

     

    Angelo Ancheta (Law) has received a year two funding of $31,519 from County of Santa Clara to support the "Unmet Civil Legal Services Program."
     
    Mike Carrasco (Chemistry) has received $159,159 from the National Science Foundation to support "MRI: Acquisition of a mass Spectrometer."
     
    David Hess (Biology) has received funding of $147,525 from the National Science Foundation to support "RUI: Utilization of Natural Variation in Domesticated Strains of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae to Elucidate Metabolic Specialization."
     
    Chris Kitts (Mechanical Engineering) has received a two year contract from NASA Ames Research Center that provides $41,000 to support "Small Spacecraft Division Microsatellite-Nanosatellite Technology Research & Development Support."
     
    Dennis C. Smolarski S.J. (Mathematics and Computer Science) has received first place in a Liturgy book award by the Catholic Journal with his book, Eucharist and American Culture.
     
    William Stover (Political Science) was elected to serve on the International Political Science Association’s Board of Advisors for a third term of three years after chairing a panel on “Terrorism and Legal Considerations” in Ankara, Turkey.
     
    Chris Weber (Physics) has received an award from National Science Foundation that provides $190,000 to support "RUI: Measurement of density of states of (Ga,Mn)As and diffusion of photoinduced order by ultrafast transient-grating spectroscopy."
     
    These announcements are from July. August announcements will be published in the next issue on Oct. 17. If you have any announcements you would like to submit, e-mail scufyi@scu.edu by Oct. 11.

     

  •  Santa Clara University Conferred 1,350 Degrees at 160th Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony

    Be a man or woman for others. Those were the words from commencement speaker and world-renowned author Dr. Khaled Hosseini to the 1,350 graduating seniors at Santa Clara University’s 160th undergraduate commencement ceremony Saturday.

    The graduates, 652 men and 698 women, ranging from ages 18 to 50, listened to Hosseini, a 1988 Santa Clara alumnus with a bachelor’s degree in biology. He told them that much of what he learned on campus as an undergraduate student is more relevant to him today than he could have ever imagined.

    “Being a man or woman for others is a great responsibility but it is also a great gift. But first, in order to accept this gift, we have to first reject the prevailing mindset of our culture—the mindset of scarcity,” he said. Read more.

    Watch a slideshow of the ceremony.

    Watch a 3-minute video of the highlights from the ceremony.

    Watch entire ceremony.

    See all social media activity from commencement.

  •  Nurture a Grateful, Prayerful Heart, Yale University's First Female Chaplain Urged Santa Clara University Advanced-Degree Graduates

    Keeping a grateful, prayerful heart will fortify you for life’s inevitable surprises, conflicts and tragedies, Yale University’s first female Roman Catholic chaplain told the graduates of Santa Clara University’s four advanced-degree programs.

    The University's 160th graduation for about 1,000 students from the School of Engineering, the Leavey School of Business and Administration, the School of Education and Counseling Psychology, and the College of Arts and Sciences took place Friday evening at the University’s Leavey Center.

    “This world is swirling with challenges to our humanity,” said Sharon M.K. Kugler, ’81, the commencement speaker and since 2007 Yale University’s chaplain. “May you nurture a gracious spirit, find reasons to say thank you every day; may you embody a kind of prayer in all that you do, and always remain awake to the wondrous possibility that is all around you.” Read more.

    Watch a slideshow of the ceremony.

    Watch entire ceremony.

  •  Use Law Degree to Provide Access to Those Who Lack It, says Former California Supreme Court Justice

    Use your law degree to make legal and civic rights accessible to those without resources, former California Supreme Court Justice Carlos Moreno told the 300 graduating law students from Santa Clara University School of Law.
     
    The law school’s Centennial-year commencement took place at 9:30 a.m. Saturday in the University’s Mission Gardens.
     
    Moreno spoke on a sunny day before a multiethnic crowd of more than 3,500 family, friends, and supporters of the 2011 graduates. He recounted how shocked he was at the difficulty he encountered when trying to procure services for his autistic niece, whom he and his wife have raised since she was five years old.
     
    He told of the maddening bureaucracy and misinformation he had to overcome to get his niece the medical, school, and social services that were hers by law. If he, a federal judge, was having problems getting the system to work, he said, what chance do those with lesser resources have?
     
    Unless individual rights to due process, equal protection, and civil rights “are enforced and exercised and given meaning in actual practice,” he said, then “for all intents and purposes they may as well cease to exist for many people in our society.”
     
    Moreno’s speech came as Santa Clara University School of Law is celebrating the 100th year since its founding as the “Santa Clara Institute of Law at Santa Clara College.” Read more.
     

     

  •  Santa Clara University Receives National Recognition for Community Service

    The Corporation for National and Community Service (CNCS) honored Santa Clara University as a leader among institutions of higher education for its support of volunteering, service-learning, and civic engagement. Santa Clara was admitted to the 2010 Presidents Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll for engaging its students, faculty, and staff in meaningful service that achieves measurable results in the community. This is the fifth consecutive year the University has received this award.
     
    There are several programs at Santa Clara—across all disciplines—that offer students opportunities for active engagement, research, and service-oriented learning. One such program, Arrupe Placements, includes approximately 50 community partners throughout Santa Clara County and, each year, allows nearly 1,200 students to learn through community engagement. The University also implemented its new core curriculum in 2009, which requires students to participate in some form of community-based learning during their undergraduate years.
     
    On campuses across the country, millions of college students are engaged in innovative projects to meet local needs, often using the skills learned in classrooms. In 2009, some 3.2 million college students dedicated more than 307 million hours of service to communities across the country, with their time and efforts valued at more than $6.4 billion. Business and law students offer tax preparation and legal services; college student volunteers provide meals, create parks, rebuild homes after disasters, conduct job training, run senior service programs, and much more. Read more.

     

  •  Interim Provost Opens Up About His 34 Years at SCU

    When Don Dodson, interim provost and vice president for Academic Affairs, retires this summer, he will mark the end of nearly three and a half decades as part of the SCU administration. “I’ve loved working at an institution that has a clear sense of its mission, a commitment to academic excellence, and a strong sense of community and collegiality,” he notes. “I feel very fortunate to have been able to spend most of my career at Santa Clara.”
     
    Formerly an assistant professor of communication at Stanford University, Dodson began his career at SCU in 1977 as special assistant to the vice president for University Relations. He held various positions over the years in the Development Office and in Academic Affairs before accepting his current position last July.
     
    He took some time to answer a few questions for fyi:
     
    What are your primary duties and accomplishments as interim provost?
    The primary responsibilities of the position are to provide leadership for all academic, co curricular, and academic-support programs and services. A particular responsibility this year has been to ensure a smooth transition until the new provost, Dennis Jacobs, begins this summer.
     
    Accomplishments in a position like this are never solo. They rest on the creativity and dedication of many people. Some of the accomplishments this year include greater integration of the Jesuit School of Theology into the University, resource planning for the new Strategic Plan, developing proposed targets for the size and composition of the faculty to achieve our educational goals, implementation of a new appointment model for non-tenure-track faculty, the continued roll-out of the new undergraduate core curriculum, approval of a new M.S. degree in Sustainable Energy, and the development of a proposal for a new Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences and a stand-alone bachelor’s degree in Environmental Studies.
     
    What are some major changes you’ve observed in your time at SCU?
    There are too many to name them all! A few that come to mind are a greater focus on the University’s Jesuit mission and identity, significant growth in the size of the University, many new majors and degree programs, the adoption of a new undergraduate core curriculum (three times over the past 30 years), an increased emphasis on research, the development of the teaching scholar model for faculty, the development of the University’s three Centers of Distinction, an increased emphasis on community-based learning, the development of Residential Learning Communities, and the physical unification of the campus and construction of many new buildings.
     
    What do you think is SCU’s strongest asset that will continue to make it a leader well into the 21st century?
    Its greatest asset is its community of talented and dedicated people who are committed to making Santa Clara an exemplar of excellence in Jesuit education. Doing this in the middle of Silicon Valley, which is a mindset as well as a region, is also a tremendous asset which we should take advantage of to the fullest.
     
    Any plans yet for your newfound free time after you retire?
    My only firm plan is to have fewer plans. I look forward to a good night’s sleep and an unscheduled day. More specifically, though, I would like more time for family, travel, reading, playing the piano and listening to music, and volunteer work, including staying involved with the University in various ways. Other than that, I have no plans!

     

  •  Human Resources, Provost's Office Announce Care.com

    As part of an ongoing effort to promote work-life balance, the University entered into a pilot project with Care.com, which provides an accessible online resource to connect individual faculty and staff with vetted care providers. The company has a particular strength in child and senior care but addresses the full lifecycle of care needs. The service enables individuals to search nationally to find and select the best care possible based on detailed profiles, background checks, and references.
                     
    Care.com also offers elder care planning and management. It provides individual
    consultations, research on provider options, comprehensive written care plans, access to a national credentialed provider network, rate negotiation, and assistance in identifying backup care.
     
    The idea for this partnership emerged through a series of work-life workshops that were sponsored by the Provost’s Office. During these sessions, a number of faculty and staff shared that it was difficult to find and retain qualified child and elder care providers. In hope of reducing this burden, the University sought out the help of Care.com. Early indications suggest that users are satisfied with the resource. Care.com’s Senior Care Counseling program has been especially well-received. A number of employees have shared that they are grateful for the guidance the senior care counselors have provided.
     
    Access to Care.com is free for all faculty and staff. Please visit www.care.com/group/scu and use your @scu.edu email address to register.

    Faculty and staff can also attend any of the summer and fall workshops to learn about the 10 most important topics for seniors and their families.

     

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