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Rubric for Vendor Evaluations

Monday, Feb. 13, 2012

Many thanks to UC Berkeley for making their rubric public. Most of the technical issues  (bottom section) are from their work. http://technology.berkeley.edu/productivity-suite/google/matrix.html

The Scenarios were built from the Town Hall meeting and task force discussions. Thank you for your help.

A. Offline Editing
Ease of Use
Usefulness
B. Faculty—for research, teaching, and service—, administrators, staff, and students need to work in distributed groups on a regular basis. Collaborations involving people with different roles (e.g., faculty and students, faculty and administrators, administrators with external constituents like Trustees) require any SCU-provided system to allow for flexibility while remaining secure and confidential (when needed).
Ease of Use
Usefulness
C. A faculty member involved in research with students needs to be able to track multiple projects simultaneously, each involving different groups of students (though some students may be in more than project) and at times also external partners/collaborators with whom all group documents and functionality needs to be shared on an equal basis. The same situation applies to an administrator tasked with setting up a search committee requiring participation from faculty from multiple departments, administrators, students, and external participants. Students working on a group project in a course face similar challenges.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
D. All groups will need access to a common project space that has a user-customizable “dashboard”/portal to share files (some of them very large, gigabytes), be able to set up audio and video conferences with multiple participants within that project space, have access to all individual as well as to a group calendar, have an online group whiteboard for brainstorming, be able to see who’s online at any given time, and have access to project management resources such as timelines, activity checks, and workflow (particularly for manager’s approvals). All documents can be edited by the group, and the system has version control to both keep copies of previous versions and allow visibility of each participant’s contributions. The latter case applies, for example, to faculty who need to evaluate each team member’s contributions to a group class or research project, to the administrator who needs to demonstrate due process, and so on.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
E. The system allows a faculty member, team leader, or “group owner” to easily assemble a mailing list of all group members, and emails can also be accessed within the workspace created (e.g., though an applet or widget). Group members have ways to manage how they receive emails and can set up rules for short-term filing and for archiving.   
Ease of Use
Usefulness
F. I sit down at my desk (home or on-campus) and log into the private network (even on a wired connection). A portal/homepage opens showing my email in-box, documents that have been recently edited, a dashboard showing various project progress, the University news feed, and a snippet of my calendar. I see that our Task Force report is due and click into that workspace. From inside the workspace I see that several questions have been raised around one of the Task Force documents so I begin working on it  -- and pleasantly discover that my colleague is working on another section of the document at the same time.  We realize that we need a perspective from a student, ideally in the Engineering school -- I jump to the University Facebook and see a senior engineering student who is currently on-line. She answers our question and we’re done. At lunch I click on the Adobe Lodge menu and send an IM to a friend asking them to meet me. My work is seamless and I don’t sign-in again for the rest of the day
Ease of Use
Usefulness
G. Create a systematic way of dealing with the retention of permanent borne digital content in the systems we now have (except to print them up?). I don’t mean “archiving” or backing up to disk; I mean storing and filing in an intentional, retrievable and organized fashion. Need to cover historically permanent digital records; records such as the records of this task force, calendars and email of key administrators, shared institutional or departmental documents that may never find their way to paper, etc. This will have implications particularly as we migrate content to new systems. May involved “projects” as entities and the ability to move to a searchable, but archived (non-editable) form. What are the best practices?
Ease of Use
Usefulness
H. Distribution List Mail:   I’m on quite a few lists so a rule examines all incoming mail and routes various list messages to various folders that I can review at my convenience.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
I. Personalized email to a listserve/group:   I need to send a nicely formatted (html) email to individuals who are part of a group. The list of individuals already exists, so I do not need to retype them. Members of the group could be affiliates, non-affiliates, or both. The emails should have a personalized salutation: Dear “Bob”, and  data: your final grade in the class is an “A”.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
J. Project Group:  Monitor all email from members of an active project and route to a folder where that can all be aggregated.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
K. Auto forwarding:  watch for messages on a particular topic, from a particular source or domain, and forward them on to another email account I use.   Modify the subject line with an additional keyword so when received by the other system, it can categorize that accordingly.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
L. Highlighting:   More than a few times I’ve overlooked the messages reminding me about timesheet approvals.  Create a rule to watch for those messages and when they arrive, highlight the subject in red so it stands out in my inbox.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
M. Manage existing box:  At times I need to manage my store of messages.  I will create a rule to identify some class of messages, perhaps by date, perhaps by subject, perhaps by source (or some combination of these) and apply the rule to all or some portion of my messages in my inbox, or perhaps even across existing folders.   They rule identifies messages meeting the criteria, and applies some sort of disposition to them.
Ease of Use
Usefulness
N. Email/Calendar
Integration w Collaboration Tools
Ease of Tools Development
User Familiarity
On Premise Integration
Administration
Authentication
Mobile Integration
Acceptance
Security & Privacy
Choice of Access
Functionality & Features
Interoperability
O. Secruity & Privacy
Acceptable Use Policy
Non-consensual Access to End-User Data
Authentication
e-Discovery
Location of Data
Encryption of Email at Rest
P. Contractual
Data Transfer upon Termination
Data Management & Transfer
Accessibility
HIPAA/BAA
Account Suspension
Notification on Access
Limitation of Liability
Defaults
Service Level Agreements

Comments Comments

Ruth Davis said on Feb 19, 2012
I realize that dealing with email archives is a "separate" issue, however, I hope you will consider how difficult it will be under each option - they do not appear to be the same.
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