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PART-TIME: Should Employees Have a Say on Their Work Schedules?

Thursday, Jul. 31, 2014

Source: Wikipedia

A recent article by the New York Times, A Push to Give Steadier Shifts to Part-Timers, profiles an increasing problem: the harsh scheduling practices that part-time workers face. These practices range from being scheduled only one day a week, requirements to be on call for days at a time, and not knowing work schedules until a day or two before. In response, women’s and labor groups have launched a national campaign to curb these practices, which they see as barriers to a healthy family life and ability to find a better job. Corporate groups have responded aggressively, claiming any more government regulation will further impede solid business decisions, particularly as many are still struggling after the recession. Should employers pay employees extra for on-call work and give two weeks’ notice of a work schedule? Are employers obligated to factor in their employees’ family and personal lives into their bottom line business decisions?

  Kirk: This is what happens when purely instrumental or economic thinking takes hold in corporate offices. A singular focus on efficiency ignores the impact on personal development and family life. These practices treat workers as expendable. I suspect must companies that follow these practices experience excessive turnover and declining efficiency. Caring for your workers’ welfare is actually good business.

  Patrick: There are a lot of moving parts of this issue. For one, many industries necessitate a flexible workforce, e.g. restaurants and retail, and business owners are under great pressure to keep costs down. Still, we must attempt to balance the efficiency gains with the personal and social costs that these practices incur. Some companies are already taking a shot at this, such as Macy’s and Walmart, which allow part-time workers to go to a website to claim available shifts. Another, Zara, has agreed to give employees 2 weeks notice of their work schedules. While not groundbreaking, they are steps in the right direction, and will hopefully prevent the need for drastic increases in regulation.

A Push to Give Steadier Shifts to Part-Timers (NY Times)

A Framework for Thinking Ethically (Markkula Center)

 

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