Arts

Lost and found

Lost and found
His Holiness the Dalai Lama at Kamataka, India, January 1998. Copyright Richard Avedon, 1998. Courtesy of the Richard Avedon Foundation.
by Jeff Gire |
A look at The Missing Peace: Artists Consider the Dalai Lama—now on campus

The task for 88 internationally renowned artists from 30 countries: Inspired by the Dalai Lama, work in media ancient and new to make your art. The result is The Missing Peace, with painting, sculpture, installation, and photography that are poignant and comical, contemplating religion and politics. Now, following a five-year world tour, 28 selections from the exhibit have taken up temporary residence on the third-floor Archives and Special Collections gallery of the Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato Technology Center, and Orradre Library.

Among the artwork on display is an intimate portrait of the Dalai Lama by Chuck Close and one of Binh Danh’s signature chlorophyll prints, which replicates a photograph on a leaf using photosynthesis. Other artists featured include Richard Avedon, Squeak Carnwath, and Mike and Doug Starn. 

The show ran through Dec. 14, with some special events this fall, including two panels with photographers and scholars: on Oct. 27, “Photography, Transformation, and Peace” (6–8:30 p.m., de Saisset Museum) and Nov. 8, “Art, Transformation, and Peace” (5–6:30 p.m., St. Clare Room, Learning Commons and Library).

Spring 2014

Table of contents

Features

Radiant house

Building a house for the 2013 Solar Decathlon. That, and changing the world.

Américas cuisine

Telling a delicious tale of food and family with chef David Cordúa ’04.

Lessons from the field

Taut and tranquil moments in Afghanistan—an essay in words and images.

Mission Matters

Carried with compassion

The Dalai Lama’s first visit to Santa Clara.

Farther afield

Building safer houses in Ecuador. Research on capuchin monkeys in Costa Rica. Helping empower girls in The Gambia. And this is just the beginning for the Johnson Scholars Program.

What connects us

The annual State of the University address, including some fabulous news for the arts and humanities. And the announcement of Santa Clara 2020, a new vision for the University.