Engineering

Dr. Hall of Fame

Dr. Hall of Fame
Engineer Terry Shoup Photo by Charles Barry.
by Heidi Williams |
Shoup honored as a Silicon Valley great.

Mechanical engineering professor and former dean of the School of Engineering, Terry Shoup M.A. ’02 was inaugurated into the Silicon Valley Engineering Hall of Fame on Feb. 24. The author of more than 100 technical papers on mechanical design and applied mechanisms and the book Design of Machine Elements, he has received numerous honors since joining SCU in 1989.

“Engineering and the solutions it brings may well be the best hope that we have for the future of life on our planet,” he said in his acceptance speech. But he cautioned, “It is not enough to be a competent engineer. To make the world into a better place, engineers must also practice the values of conscience and compassion.” 

Dean of engineering for 13 years, Shoup inaugurated programs to serve underrepresented high school students and encourage them to study engineering in college. He created the nation’s first “degree warranty” program, through which SCU engineering graduates can return to campus and take graduate courses tuition-free if they are ever laid off.

At the Hall of Fame he joins a host of engineering luminaries, among them a few SCU faculty and alumni: Leo Ruth ’65, Robert Parden, George Sullivan (the first dean of engineering), Richard Pefley, William Perry, Sam Cristofano M.S. ’74, William Adams ’37, Anthony Turturici ’51, Frank Greene Ph.D. ’70, and Meyya Meyyappan. Heidi Williams mag-bug

Summer 2014

Table of contents

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