history and traditions

Santa Clara Snapshot: 1912

Santa Clara Snapshot: 1912
Universitas Sancta Clarae: With the addition of courses in engineering, architecture, and law, the college becomes a university and the celebration in June draws tens of thousands. Courtesy SCU Archives
by Holly Hanbury-Brown '12 |
  • 1 billiard room, 8 large classrooms, and accommodations for 120 senior students in the just-completed O’Connor Hall.
  • 3 degree programs offered in the new College of Engineering: civil, mechanical, and electrical.
  • 30 cents for a dozen Eastern oysters to take home at the Santa Clara Restaurant and Oyster House. (California oysters are a much better buy, at 50 cents for 100.)
  • 121 runners participate in San Francisco’s inaugural Cross City Race—now known as Bay to Breakers.
  • 35,000 people attend the celebration on June 16—and 10,000 of them march in a parade—marking the transformation of Santa Clara College into the University of Santa Clara. Archbishop P.W. Riordan of San Francisco presides at commencement.
  • 10,091,550 square miles of the sun will be affected by a “great solar disturbance” the first week in June, predicts J.S. Ricard, S.J., who is director of the college observatory and known as “Padre of the Rains.”

Summer 2014

Table of contents

Features

A day with the Dalai Lama

High-spirited and hushed moments from Feb. 24: a day to talk about business, ethics, compassion.

The Catholic writer today

Poet and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts Dana Gioia argues that Catholic writers must renovate and reoccupy their own tradition.

Our stories and the theatre of awe

Pulitzer Prize–winning author Marilynne Robinson speaks about grace, discernment, and being a modern believer.

Mission Matters

What would the next generation say?

Hossam Baghat, one of Egypt’s leading human rights activists, was awarded the 2014 Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize for his work defending human rights.

Breaking records on the maplewood

Scoring 40 points in one game. And besting Steve Nash’s freshman year.

How's the water?

A lab on a chip helps provide the answer—which is a matter of life and death when the question is whether drinking water contains arsenic.