Awards

MAGGIEnificent

MAGGIEnificent
Photo by Charles Barry
by Steven Boyd Saum |

And the MAGGIE Award for the best overall in the category goes to ... Santa Clara Magazine for the Winter 2013 edition, “Why Silicon Valley loves the humanities.” Presented by the Western Publishing Association for 63 years, the MAGGIEs are a regionwide competition. SCM competed in a category that included associations and nonprofits, along with university magazines. Other honorees at the awards presented in Los Angeles this May included Mother Jones and Variety.

Also regionally, the Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE) recognized the mag with a few 2014 medals: a silver for staff writing (a set of five articles that we describe as “Saints, sinners, and seven minutes of terror”), and silver and bronze for photographer Charles Barry—for “Train ride,” a photo of U.S. Rep. Zoe Lofgren J.D. ’75, and “Studio portrait with a saint,” a portrait of the St. Clare statue that used to grace the front of the Mission Church.

The sage judges at CASE awarded a silver to SCU for the 2011–12 President’s Report, Momentum: Indicators of Success, and a gold medal for the video Become More.

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Summer 2014

Table of contents

Features

A day with the Dalai Lama

High-spirited and hushed moments from Feb. 24: a day to talk about business, ethics, compassion.

The Catholic writer today

Poet and former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts Dana Gioia argues that Catholic writers must renovate and reoccupy their own tradition.

Our stories and the theatre of awe

Pulitzer Prize–winning author Marilynne Robinson speaks about grace, discernment, and being a modern believer.

Mission Matters

What would the next generation say?

Hossam Baghat, one of Egypt’s leading human rights activists, was awarded the 2014 Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize for his work defending human rights.

Breaking records on the maplewood

Scoring 40 points in one game. And besting Steve Nash’s freshman year.

How's the water?

A lab on a chip helps provide the answer—which is a matter of life and death when the question is whether drinking water contains arsenic.