Law

  • A sight of innocence

    A sight of innocence

    George Souliotes went to prison for three life sentences after he was convicted of arson and murder. Twenty years later, he’s out—after the Northern California Innocence Project proved he didn’t do it.

    Winter 2014

  • Patent trolls, beware

    Patent trolls, beware

    The White House has brought on SCU’s Colleen Chien, a leading expert in patent law, as senior advisor.

    Winter 2014

  • A powerhouse of high tech law

    A powerhouse of high tech law

    SCU grads populate the top ranks of Silicon Valley legal departments because technology is “everywhere they turn,” says High Tech Law Institute director Eric Goldman.

  • When justice is kidnapped

    When justice is kidnapped

    The 2013 Alexander Law Prize honors Chen Guangcheng, a Chinese civil-rights activist and attorney who protested government abuses—including excessive enforcement of the one-child policy—then escaped house arrest to the U.S. Embassy in Beijing.

    Spring/Summer 2013

  • 'Patent trolls' file majority of U.S. patent lawsuits

    'Patent trolls' file majority of U.S. patent lawsuits

    SCU law professor Colleen Chien says individuals and companies that do not themselves make anything are bringing the majority of U.S. patent lawsuits.

  • What we talk about when we talk about 'like'

    What we talk about when we talk about 'like'

    Internet ethics expert Irina Raicu considers why clicking a button isn’t necessarily an endorsement.

  • How to nail a dictator

    How to nail a dictator

    The 2012 Alexander Law Prize honors Spanish human rights advocate and attorney Almudena Bernabeu, who has spent 15 years pursuing justice for victims across Latin America, Africa, and the world.

  • A Constitution for Facebook Nation

    A Constitution for Facebook Nation

    Chicago author and law professor Lori Andrews spoke about online privacy issues on March 8.

  • Discouraging job creation overseas could backfire

    Discouraging job creation overseas could backfire

    David Yosifon argues that there are other ways to encourage job growth without resorting to protectionism.

  • Bribes, bombs, and outright lies

    Bribes, bombs, and outright lies

    Legendary lawyer Clarence Darrow comes to campus—and shows that ethical issues raised in the Trial of the Century remain as vexing today as they did when spittoons lined the courthouse floor.

    Winter 2012 | LAW

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Winter 2014

Table of contents

Features

Rise up, my love

There are the sanctuaries built for worship—and that carry beauty and grace for all to see. Then there are the improvised places of faith, perhaps more subtle in how they speak to the wonder worked there.

The chaplain is in the House

With the way things have gone recently in Congress, looking to the heavens for some help and guidance might seem like a very good idea. In fact, that’s what Pat Conroy, S.J., M.Div. ’83 is there to do.

Welcome to Citizenville

Who published the one book on government in 2013 that conservative firebrand Newt Gingrich told all true believers that they should read? Well, the author is now lieutenant governor of California. Before that, he was mayor of San Francisco. That’s right: It’s Gavin Newsom ’89.

Mission Matters

Goooaal!

Women’s soccer wins the West Coast Conference championship.

Patent trolls, beware

The White House has brought on SCU’s Colleen Chien, a leading expert in patent law, as senior advisor.

A sight of innocence

George Souliotes went to prison for three life sentences after he was convicted of arson and murder. Twenty years later, he’s out—after the Northern California Innocence Project proved he didn’t do it.