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Showing obituaries submitted in last 6 months


Lee Seemann

Long before he became an early Warren Buffett investor and a wealthy philanthropist, Lee Seemann '42 was a 23-year-old from Omaha piloting a B-17 over Germany. Seemann, a decorated war hero who often called himself “an incredibly lucky guy,” died on June 2, 2015, in Omaha. He was 95.

Seemann was born May 10, 1920, in Minnesota, but his father, a car dealer, soon moved the family to Omaha. Lee attended Dundee Elementary and Central High, class of ’38. At 6-foot-1 and 210 pounds, he played football at Santa Clara University in California, where he took part in ROTC and was president of the senior class. After World War II, in which he survived a number of close calls, he met Willa Davis, who immediately liked him.

Seemann bombed the Normandy coast on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and flew his final mission on Aug. 9. Some 30,000 American airmen based in England died in the war, but Seemann enjoyed Thanksgiving dinner with his mother in Omaha.

He received the Silver Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross (twice), the Purple Heart and the Air Medal with four oak leaf clusters. He recounts his harrowing tales in his 1998 memoir with David Harding, titled I Thought We Were Goners.

Lee became a branch manager at International Harvester and later started his own business, Seemann Truck and Trailer.Willa’s father was a prominent Omaha urologist, Dr. Edwin Davis. He and the Seemanns, still in their 20s, invested with Buffett in the late 1950s and built large fortunes. Over the years, Lee and Willa Seemann have donated quietly to universities, hospitals, museums, churches and other charities. In the 1990s, they were major contributors to the Strategic Air & Space Museum. They also donated to his high school, and a decade ago Central named its new football facility Seemann Stadium.


The couple raised four children, but suffered the death of daughter Jane Seemann in a 1988 car crash in Omaha.

In 2000, Seemann underwent heart bypass surgery. In recent times he was in hospice care, and his wife said he died from various old-age ailments.


Besides his wife, he is survived by sons Lee Seemann Jr. of Omaha and Scott of Washington state; and daughter Ann Drickey of Palm Springs, California.
submitted Aug. 4, 2015 8:23A


Raymond Ravaglia


Raymond L. Ravaglia '48, 89, son of Antonio and Caterina, brother of Dolores, beloved husband and father, peacefully passed away on Monday, May 4, 2015 at his home in Millbrae. He is survived by Donna, his wife of 51 years, their children Ray, Eric, and Mark, and grandchildren Isabella, Lorenzo, Margaret, and Tiffany.
Growing up in the Mission District of San Francisco, Ray received a Jesuit education, attending Saint Ignatius High School (’44) and then Santa Clara University (’48), where he earned a BS in chemistry. Following college Ray went to work at Bethlehem Steel as a Metallurgist and Industrial Chemist. It was while at Bethlehem Steel that he met his wife Donna.
A dedicated son, Ray spent much of his free time working with his parents on the family orchard and vineyard in Healdsburg. Some of his fondest memories were of watching his father in his late 90s still working the fields and his mother still making the family dinner for everyone.
After moving to Millbrae in 1969, Ray became active in youth athletics, serving as score keeper and coach for various baseball teams and also as the founder of the American Youth Soccer Organization (AYSO) in Millbrae and as an AYSO Regional Commissioner. The early days of organized youth soccer involved being a jack of all trades and Ray would often drag his boys out early Saturday morning to line the fields with chalk and assemble the makeshift goals that he had built out of rebar (from Bethlehem Steel) and PVC pipe. Committed to the AYSO motto of “Everyone Plays” Ray often coached teams that could not find coaches of their own, even though this could mean coaching against his sons’ teams.
In addition to his support of youth athletics, Ray served on the Personnel Committee for the City of Millbrae for over ten years, as well as on a number of ad hoc committees. This life of public service was recognized by the City of Millbrae when it gave him the Man of the Year Award. In his later years Ray embraced the role of grandfather, playing the Italian Nonno with delight. Even after Parkinson’s had severely limited his mobility he was always up for a game of “whack the balloon with the cane.” His years at Bethlehem Steel had taught him the importance of safety first in all things and his children delighted in seeing his safety admonishments now directed towards the new generation and took solace in knowledge that the grandchildren would always be safe with their Nonno around. He will be sorely missed.
submitted Jul. 20, 2015 2:16P

Faculty & Staff

Theodore Rynes


Rev. Theodore J. Rynes, S.J. died May 29, 2015, at Santa Clara University. He was 83 years old. Ted was born in Omaha, Nebraska, the son of Theodore Rynes and Ruth Kleffner Rynes. He attended Creighton Prep School and entered the Jesuit novitiate at Florissant, Missouri on August 8, 1949. He received his AB and MA in English from St. Louis University and taught English at Campion Prep, Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin, before beginning theology studies at St. Mary's College, St. Mary's, Kansas. He was ordained a priest in the Jesuit Church of the Gesu in Milwaukee on June 12, 1962 and pronounced his final vows as a Jesuit on August 15, 1965.
Ted came to California in 1964 for graduate studies in English at the University of California, Berkeley. He completed a dissertation on mutual influences on the satiric method of Alexander Pope and Jonathan Swift, and received his Ph.D. in 1973. In 1970 he began a long association as a professor of English at Santa Clara University, teaching a variety of classes in addition to his specialty of Eighteenth Century British literature. An extraordinarily generous teacher, Father Rynes became a significant mentor and a loyal friend to his many students, appreciating them as God's great gifts to him. He is survived by his sister, Marilyn Giannattasio (Wauwatosa, WI), his brother, Donald Rynes and his wife, Jean (Dover, DE), nieces and nephews.

Donations may be made in memory of Father Rynes to the Canterbury Fellowship, English Department, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053.


submitted Jul. 20, 2015 2:24P
Tenny Wright

On June 17, longtime profressor of religious studies Tennant (Tenny) Wright, S.J., '63 STL (Licentiate in Sacred Theology) died at the age of 87. He was born in Los Angeles on September 16, 1927, the son of Tennant C. Wright, Sr., a film director and Warner Brothers executive, and Marion McMahon Wright.

Wright graduated from Loyola High School, Los Angeles, and after earning his BA in English at Loyola Marymount University, he entered the Jesuit novitiate at Los Gatos in 1950. He earned further degrees in English at Gonzaga University, theology at Santa Clara, and pursued graduate studies in religious studies at the University of Chicago. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1962.

His 58-year association with Santa Clara University began as an instructor in English, 1956-1959. After ordination, he returned to Santa Clara as teacher of theology, 1964-1967, and senior lecturer of religious studies, 1969-2008. Following his formal retirement from teaching he continued to teach and keep active in ministry. For many years he spent one semester a year teaching Religious Studies at St. John's College, Belize, and doing pastoral ministry there.

Tenny was a man of many interests. His concern with social justice issues resulted in correspondence with presidents, prime ministers, members of Congress, and activists. His interest in literature resulted in a long time correspondence with Graham Greene. He also taught for a brief time in Xiamen, China, studied Zen Buddhism in Japan, and he served the Diocese of San Jose in his ministry to incarcerated youth and their families as well as to the Emmaus Community of LGBT Catholics. He also published articles and op-ed pieces in a number of newspapers and periodicals on a variety of religious and social subjects.

submitted Jun. 28, 2015 5:14P
John Merryman

An internationally renowned expert on art and cultural property law as well as comparative law, John Henry Merryman, dedicated his life to the study and teaching of law at Stanford, influencing generations of lawyers and art historians here and around the world from the time he joined the law faculty in 1953 until his death this week at the age of 95. Before that he was faculty at Santa Clara University from 1948 to 1956.

“John Merryman was a giant in several fields — comparative law and the field he helped create, art and the law,” said M. Elizabeth Magill, the Richard E. Lang Professor of Law and dean of Stanford Law School. “He was a devoted teacher and mentor to his students. He taught his last class, “Stolen Art,” only a couple months ago, and helped launch the careers of many of our graduates who work at the intersection of the arts and the law.”

Merryman, the Nelson Bowman Sweitzer and Marie B. Sweitzer Professor of Law, Emeritus, and Affiliated Professor in the Department of Art, Emeritus, died on Aug. 3, 2015 at the age of 95 of natural causes at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. Details of a memorial service are not yet available, but one is expected to be held in the fall.

Pioneering the Study of Art Law

“In 1970 no one spoke of art law as a field for serious study or even as a subject for teaching. That art law is today recognized internationally as being essential to every country interested in protecting its cultural patrimony, by every American art museum as vital to the proper conduct of its trustees and by all artists as protecting their rights, is due in large measure to the publications and teachings of John Henry Merryman,” wrote the late art historian and Stanford Professor Albert Elsen in a 1987 Stanford Law Review tribute to Merryman, “Founding the Field of Art Law.”

Merryman introduced the idea for the new course “Law, Ethics and the Visual Arts,” in 1970 to a somewhat skeptical law faculty. Merryman taught the course in 1971, the first of its kind. Elsen collaborated and co-taught with Merryman — the two delving into questions of tax, copyright, contracts, regulation, cultural property, ethics and more — creating a syllabus for the nascent field of study and publishing the groundbreaking book Law, Ethics and the Visual Arts, now in its fourth edition.

Before that, Merryman was a comparative law scholar of international standing. “His great book on The Civil Law Tradition caused a fundamental rethinking of comparative law and subsequent scholarship — and courses based on that scholarship — were powerfully strengthened as a result,” said Thomas Ehrlich, dean of Stanford Law School from 1971 until 1976. “John’s many works relating to art and cultural property, as well as his multiple courses in that arena, were no less groundbreaking. He deployed his strengths in comparative law to produce penetrating analyses on the ownership of antiquities, as well as on art and the law more generally. Students from across the Stanford campus and beyond flocked to John’s classes. John was one-of-a-kind, as colleague and as dear friend.”

Merryman was truly an international scholar who was both a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fulbright Research Professor at the Max Planck Institute. His expertise in comparative law and art law led to visiting positions at universities in Mexico, Greece, Italy, Germany and Austria. He was president of the International Cultural Property Society and on the editorial board for various publications, including theInternational Journal of Cultural Propertyand the American Journal of Comparative Law.

He received numerous international prizes and honors over the course of his career, including the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic and honorary doctorates from Aix-en-Provence, Rome (Tor Vergata), and Trieste, and was celebrated in two Festschriften: “Comparative and Private International Law: Essays in Honor of John Henry Merryman on His Seventieth Birthday” and “Legal Culture in the Age of Globalization: Latin America and Latin Europe.”

In 2004 he received the American Society of Comparative Law’s Lifetime Achievement Award “for his extraordinary scholarly contribution over a lifetime to comparative law in the United States.”

“John was for all of us a model of civility and old-world charm. He bore with unfailing grace the mounting burdens of age, continuing to write and teach deep into his retirement,” said George Fisher, the Judge John Crown Professor of Law and faculty co-director of the Stanford Criminal Prosecution Clinic. “And he never lost his generous interest in the work of his friends and colleagues. He was a scholar for the ages.”

“He was a truly innovative scholar, ahead of his time throughout his long career,” said Lawrence M. Friedman, the Marion Rice Kirkwood Professor of Law.

Merryman’s expertise in and enthusiasm for art benefited Stanford beyond the reach of his scholarship. In the 1970s, when the law school was building its “new” campus, he chaired the design committee.

“When the law school moved from the Quad to its new home in 1975, John undertook to use his art expertise to persuade some of the best graphic printmakers to lend major works of art to the Law School where they became the best art collection at Stanford apart from the Museum,” recalled Ehrlich. “He identified a stunning Barbara Hepworth sculpture [titled “Four Square (Walk Through)”] to borrow as the centerpiece of the school’s courtyard, and when the loan was up he arranged a gift of the elegant Calder sculpture that replaced it (titled “Le Faucon”). In honor of his many contributions to art, a good friend and admirer gave Stanford one of the largest and most handsome sculptures on the campus, created by Mark di Suvero.”

The di Suvero sculpture, “The Sieve of Eratosthenes,” was, according to a Stanford press release from March 2000, donated to Stanford by Daniel Shapiro and Agnes Gund, who wished to honor Merryman “by thanking him for all he has done for us and everyone interested in art by giving a gift in his honor to Stanford of a work of an artist that John thought was sorely missing on campus. And so now, because of John, there is Mark di Suvero’s ‘The Sieve of Eratosthenes,’ the work of a great artist to celebrate a great teacher and friend of art.”

Early Enthusiasm for Music and the Arts

Born in Portland, Ore., on Feb. 24, 1920, Merryman studied chemistry at the University of Portland and received a B.S. in chemistry in 1943. He continued his study of chemistry, receiving an M.S. from the University of Notre Dame in 1944, but then switched to law. He received a J.D. from the University of Notre Dame in 1947. NYU School of Law provided him with a teaching fellowship and the opportunity to continue his legal studies and he received his LLM in 1950 and JSD in 1955. He taught law at Santa Clara University (then called the University of Santa Clara) and joined the Stanford Law faculty in 1953.

Merryman also was a professional, card-carrying musician, financing his early education by playing piano in a dance band he formed called John Merryman and His Merry Men. He continued to play piano throughout his life, sharing his enthusiasm for music and the arts at Stanford.

“John and his wonderful late wife, Nancy, were friends of my wife Ellen and me for over 50 years, since we first came to Stanford in 1965, as they were friends of countless others — literally from around the world,” recalled Ehrlich. “John had a joyful spirit that illuminated not just every conversation of which he was a part, but every room where he was present. He was a wonderful piano player of Broadway show hits, jazz and much more. John was a learner, and he was able to share his learning with his friends with such a twinkle in his eye that you quite forgot that he was really teaching you and helping along while telling riotously funny tales.”

That early enthusiasm barely dimmed in retirement, as he continued to publish — and to teach. “Stolen Art,” which he taught in fall 2014, was a new course he had recently developed, likely the first of its kind.

“Some years ago I had the pleasure of ‘taking’ John’s oral history. I was struck by the satisfying life revealed in his reminiscences, full of intellectual challenge and warm communal interchange,” said Barbara Allen Babcock, the Judge John Crown Professor of Law, Emerita. “He was an inspiration.”

While his scholarship was international, it was perhaps most keenly felt at Stanford.

“In my 30 years as a faculty member at this remarkable place, John Merryman was clearly one of the most remarkable of my colleagues,” recalled Henry “Hank” T. Greely, the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law. “Hired here as the law librarian, he managed not one but two spectacular scholarly careers, the first as one of the leading comparative law scholars in the world and then later as one of the world’s very top ‘art and the law’ scholars. His civil law work led to him being named an Italian knight — un Cavaliero della Republica Italiana. Which brings to mind an even more important point about John. He was always a gentlemen: gracious, helpful, self-deprecating. I would say that they aren’t making them like John Merryman anymore, but they (almost) never did. He was a great scholar, a wonderful colleague and a very good person. I miss him.”

“John was a treasured colleague. We all sought his advice on a range of subjects because of his incisive mind, his wit and his insight. The world is a less interesting and elegant place without John,” said Magill. “We all mourn the passing of this wonderful man, who was a class act in every respect.”

Merryman is survived by three step-children, Leonard P. Edwards, Samuel D. Edwards and Bruce H. Edwards; four step-grandchildren; and five great step-grandchildren. His wife, Nancy Edwards Merryman, passed away in January. 


submitted Aug. 11, 2015 9:40A
David Palmer
On September 18, David R. Palmer, retired faculty member from the Management Department, died after a chronic illness. He was a treasured member of the SCU faculty for more than 30 years.  With his family and friends, we remember David and offer our prayers for his eternal rest and the consolation of all his loved ones.

David taught courses in both the undergraduate and MBA programs in the Leavey School of Business, specializing in management strategy and corporate social responsibility.  He also was instrumental in developing the Leavey School’s theme-based Executive MBA program in which he taught for many years.  David had a special love for Santa Clara University and a warm fondness for those with whom he worked for so many years.

While we mourn David’s death we also recall the gift he was to his family, friends, colleagues and students. Notes of condolence may be sent to his companion of many years, Marcie Radius, care of the Management Department:
Ms. Marcie Radius
c/o Management Department
Leavey School of Business
Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053


submitted Nov. 9, 2015 12:07P

Friends of the University

Nello Santacroce


Nello Elio Paul Santacroce, born January 31, 1927, to John and Agatha Santacroce in Abruzzo, Italy, passed to our Lord on June 20, 2015, with Pamela, his wife of 32 years, and Juan Silva, trusted friend and employee, at his bedside.
In 1934, Nello, his mother and four siblings immigrated to America. Nello's father, John, and eldest brother, Mario, immigrated ahead of Mussolini's grip on Italy and were waiting in the depression of 1934 to welcome the rest of the family. Nello graduated from high school, received his citizenship and was inducted into the U.S. Army on June 12, 1945. He was sent to Italy and served in Naples at a POW camp and salvage company.
Nello graduated from the University of Connecticut in 1951 and married Jean Noies. They moved to California; his siblings and his parents joining him later.
Nello's entrepreneurial skills flourished in California. He sold appliances, owned appliance distributors and then transitioned to construction and land development as "The Santacroce Brothers". The fun of the challenge, "the deal", was what caused Nello to develop properties in Palm Springs, Sacramento, Grass Valley, Concord, Sunnyvale, Silicon Valley and finally throughout Santa Cruz County.
Nello was truly an entrepreneur in Santa Cruz where he owned and operated Coastal Nursery, Stateco Insurance, and a jewelry business. He also developed, owned and operated a mini storage company in Gilroy.
Nello was preceded in death by his first wife, Jean; siblings, Mario, Fred, Elsa, Irma and Victoria; parents, John and Agatha. He is survived by his daughters, Dea Santacroce and Jan Santacroce and wife, Pam. He is also survived by numerous nieces, nephews and a large extended family.


submitted Jul. 20, 2015 2:28P
Nancy Ghilotti

Nancy Motta Ghilotti, a long time resident of San Rafael, a generous and compassionate spirit, friend and mother, transitioned into the afterlife and into the loving arms of her son, Dino Ghilotti, on July 14th, 2015. She was 57.

She is survived by her beloved husband Richard Ghilotti '68, daughter Michelle Ghilotti Mandel '96, son Willie Ghilotti, son-in-law Josh Mandel, daughter-in-law Rochelle Ghilotti and grandchildren Jayden Ghilotti (12), Nolan Mandel (10), Vivian Ghilotti (3) baby Dino Ghilotti (1) and loving family in Guatemala including three sisters, a brother and many nieces and nephews.

She is preceded by her father Rafael Motta, mother Stella May, stepfather Joseph May and son, Dino Richard Ghilotti, who received his wings on May 12, 2013, after graduating from the University of Miami.

Nancy was born on January 22nd, 1958 in Guatemala City. Often referred to as "the city of the eternal spring" because of Guatemala City's perfect temperature all year-round, this was Nancy's favorite type of weather. Guatemala is an ancient, diverse and exotic country she lovingly called home. As a child, she possessed a contagious smile and sweet sense of humor. From a young age, Nancy was an avid reader (hello, Nancy Drew) and loved school. In 1979, she moved to the United States with her mother, stepfather, daughter Michelle, and son Willie to start a new life in California. Nancy continued her education at San Francisco State University and then worked in sales at the famous Mark Hopkins Hotel.

In 1986, Nancy met her husband Dick on a blind date in San Francisco. They fell in love and were married in Napa Valley in 1988 and went on to create a loving, close-knit family through a 30-year relationship that was based on love, respect and mutual understanding. Their yin and yang approach to life made them a solid and soulful match. Together, they were the perfect couple that family and friends celebrated life with for over three decades.

In 1991, Richard and Nancy added a beautiful baby boy to their family, Dino Richard Ghilotti, who was known as the Â'fireplace' of the family. To accommodate the growing family, Dick and Nancy built a beautiful home in the San Rafael hills overlooking San Pablo Bay. This welcoming home was known amongst family and friends as "Club G". It became a place where many family gatherings were celebrated, such as birthdays, engagements and graduation parties. Nancy's enthusiasm and talent for party planning made these events extraordinary because of her signature gifts of creativity and attention to every single detail. One thing is clear - her zest for life spilled over into memorable events that were talked about for years to come.

Above all else, Nancy's greatest passion in life was her family. From a young age, she raised three children to be compassionate, social, giving and positive-minded contributors to society. It was no mystery that Nancy was a fiery and fun force to be reckoned with when it came to her loved ones. Nancy's loyalty was to her family, no matter what circumstance, and she made sure that she gave them as much love as possible. Her love for her family was shown in plans for family fun: celebrations, vacations, making gifts extra special, taking photos (lots of them!), and recently, playing "Ring Around the Rosy", meditating, sinking backward overhead basketball shots and hiking with her four grandchildren. She was an incredible and one-of-a-kind GRANDmother, and known as "GiGi" to her grandchildren. Nancy was also a lover of animals, and proud dog owner of Preemo, Clifford, Carmelo and most recently Roo, Dino's dog from Miami, whom she and Dick adopted into their lives two years ago.

Throughout her life, and even through the grief over the last two years in losing her youngest son, she maintained her vibrant personality and had a daring and energetic demeanor that inspired the minds and touched the hearts of many. She, as many have shared with her family, was teaching others to reflect on life's challenges with a tenacity and spirit, similar to hers. 
Until her passing, she remained a fervent cheerleader of education. She sent all of her children to the best schools. After Dino's passing, she honored Dino's life and legacy by starting The dg Foundation, giving youth who may otherwise not get the chance to receive a quality education and the opportunity to attend San Domenico, Marin Catholic and University of Miami. The family is proud to announce that Nancy will join Dino as an honoree of The dg Foundation. To learn more about the foundation, please visit
Nancy is remembered by her children and grandchildren as hip (oh so young and hip), a woman who was always up for anything, and a mother and grandmother who always, no matter what, put family first and never took no for an answer. She is remembered by her family in Guatemala as a generous woman with an infectious smile who belted the lyrics of her favorite songs and as a jokester who, in the funniest way mixed Spanish and English, in her most expressive moments.

Her favorite places and best memories in the world were made on family vacations in Cabo San Lucas, Lake Tahoe, Guatemala, Italy, Miami and most recently India, where she and her husband Dick vacationed for a month. Before and after her trip to India, she discovered herself in a new light embracing spirituality, spiritual healing and selflessly helping others who were grieving as well.

The family would like to thank everyone who has shown their love, support and compassion over the past two years, and especially the last few weeks.

submitted Aug. 6, 2015 9:07P
Lynn Hatch

Lynn Hatch, the loving, socially gifted and ever-resilient matriarch of the Hatch family, passed away peacefully in her home on September 11, 2015. She is survived by her children Katherine '81, Maury (Kristen) and Bruce and her grandchildren Nathan and Lindsay. She was preceded in death by her husband, Judge Leighton Hatch '50, and her son Francis Hatch.

Born Avalyn Hope Fjelstad in Granville, North Dakota, on December 27, 1930, Lynn was raised in North Dakota until her freshman year in high school. She then lived briefly in Chicago before traveling by train to San Francisco after World War II to join her family in Richmond, Calif. After graduating high school in 1948, she worked as a secretary in Berkeley and Oakland. In 1958 she met and married the love of her life, Leighton, and they spent 53 years building a life together full of family, community service and adventurous travel. Lynn and Leighton first lived in San Francisco, until 1960, then purchased their first home together in Mill Valley, where they started a family. In 1967 the family of six moved to Sacramento, where Governor Ronald Reagan appointed Leighton as Director of the Department of Consumer Affairs.

Over the years Lynn was an active member of the Land Park community, participating as a volunteer in the Holy Spirit Mothers' Club, the Sacramento Judges' Wives Association, and serving as a board member of the Sacramento Food Bank and Family Services Volunteer Bridge Builders Program. She volunteered as a docent for school programs, coordinated fundraising events, organized other volunteers, and provided direct service to those in need as mentored by Father Dan Madigan and Sister Kathleen Horgan. Among all these responsibilities, Lynn always felt her most significant accomplishment was raising her four children.

Lynn thoroughly enjoyed traveling and meeting people. She and Leighton, a retired Army officer, visited 33 different countries and 31 states. Her favorite trips were military "space available" travel adventures, where she often brought home-baked goods for her flight crew. Highlights of these journeys include an elephant ride in Chiang Mai, Thailand, and renewing her vows with Leighton in Cork, Ireland.

In her later years, Lynn enjoyed the company of her family and in particular her grandchildren. She found great happiness in the comfort of her puppies, Libby and Marlee. She was an avid Kindle reader, a staunch Giants fan (Sergio Romo!) and an enthusiastic armchair Jeopardy participant. During her final years, she deeply appreciated the care provided by her doctors Jeffery H. Jones and Monice Kwok, caregivers Aggie Shriwastow and Manjula Narayan, and her longtime hairdresser Kathy Garcia.

submitted Oct. 2, 2015 10:29A
Grace Sautter

Known as a selfless doer, Grace Sautter went soaring with the angels from her Los Gatos home on August 14, 2015. She was born in 1921 in the family home on 13th Street in San Jose and moved to town in 1964.

Locally, Grace was well known for her volunteer work at the Village House, a now-closed restaurant that was run by volunteers who donated their profits to Eastfield Ming Quong.

"Grace was our dishwasher," Village House volunteer Shirley Johnson said. Johnson met Grace at the restaurant 42 years ago, and the women became fast friends. "She had a beautiful soul," Johnson said. "Everybody liked her and she loved people."

Grace loved her groups, too, including the Art Docents of Los Gatos, which she joined in 1971. She served on the docents' board and was a past president.

"Grace was one of those ladies who was busy all the time," Johnson said. "She still went to meetings even when she wasn't feeling well. When she couldn't drive anymore, people picked her up."

Her list of meetings to attend included Santa Clara University's Catala Club. Grace joined the women's club in 1980 and acted as its historian. The group raises scholarship funds for SCU undergraduates.

"Grace has kept meticulous records of Catala Club events--taking pictures, putting the scrapbooks together and when possible sending copies of her photos to subjects," Catala president Dianne Bonino wrote in November 2014. "Over the years Grace has been a loyal member."

Grace was also a working woman, who was employed by the Roos Bros. and Hale Brothers department stores in the 1930s.

In 1942 she joined the Anglo Bank that later became Wells Fargo. That job led her to become the first female president of the Santa Clara County chapter of the American Institute of Banking.

Armed with a commercial banking certificate from San Jose State, Grace remained in banking until 1963. But at the age of 65, following the 1986 death of her husband Fred, Grace returned to work at Wells Fargo in Los Gatos. By the time she retired in 2003, her banking career had spanned 61 years.

"Her greatest desire in life was to be a mother," son Bill Sautter '84 wrote. An only child, Sautter described Grace as an "extraordinary mother, wife and homemaker," who was also a woman of deep Christian faith. "What mattered most to her was love and harmony with family and friends," he wrote in her obituary.

Sautter also said his mother had a near-photographic memory and was an avid traveler and photographer, a 49er and Giants fan, and a constant letter writer who had beautiful penmanship.

It's a wonder she had time to be the caregiver for her older sister Elsie Sullivan, who is now 101 years old.

submitted Aug. 21, 2015 1:34P
Frank Hernandez
The father of Board of Regents Member Laurita Hernandez '85 has passed away. Frank Hernandez died the week of September 1. Laurita is asking that in lieu of flowers gifts be made to support the STEM Project Fund at Santa Clara University. 
 Acknowledgments should be sent to Laurita "Laurie." 


submitted Oct. 2, 2015 10:32A
Donna Burdick

Donna Burdick, Nov. 14, 1929-Jul. 12, 2015, resident of Santa Clara. She was preceded in death by devoted husband George Burdick. Beloved mother of Robin Burdick, Geordie Burdick '79, Meg Mallamace, Beth Cintas and Adam Burdick. Loving mother-in-law of Ray Mallamace and Shari Burdick. Adored grandmother (Grandy) of Caitlin Cintas, Megan Cintas, Gwendolyn Burdick, Amanda Morris (Matt Morris) and Nicholas Seely. Cherished great-grandmother of Dakota Kundo and Mason Morris. Dearest sister of Aldean Simi and Julie Tuckey, and loving aunt to many adoring nieces and nephews.

A native of San Francisco and graduate of Mercy High School in Burlingame. Resident of Santa Clara for the past 60 years. Donna blessed us with her intelligence, quick and sassy wit and deep passion for her family, friends, home and community. Donna served the city of Santa Clara and surrounding community over the years through many organizations and activities, including Soroptimist International of Santa Clara/Silicon Valley, Santa Clara Woman's Club (Hacienda), and the Mission City Community Fund. She was appointed to the Agnew State Hospital Board by Governor George Deukmejian, and served on the City of Santa Clara's El Camino Real Task Force and Kaiser Hospital Task Force. She was also a member of SCU's Catala Club.


submitted Aug. 6, 2015 9:03P
Deloris Maida

Deloris J. Maida was born on October 15, 1925, and passed away on Sunday, May 31, 2015. She was born in Winchester, Indiana, to Thelma and Charles Dailey. Preceded in death by her loving husband John A. Maida Jr., who found the "blonde bombshell" on the second floor of Letterman General Hospital where they both worked and fell in love. Dee dedicated many years of her life to her community starting with 15 years of service as Election Chairman in San Jose. She served as President of the American Little League, President of Bellarmine College Prep Mothers Guild, Presentation High School Parent Group, President of Delta Omega Sorority, and Mother Butler High School Women's Guild President. Dee was an avid golfer and was Captain of the San Jose Country Club 18 Hole Group, Vice President of the 18 Hole Group at Santa Rosa Country Club in Palm Desert and Palm Desert Greens 18 Hole Group.

Dee worked at Santa Clara University for 15 years and started the Benson Center Information Booth. She inspired women in her community and began a women's investment group. Also preceded in death by her twin sister, Doris Jane, her brother, Charles, and her youngest sister, Mary. She is survived by her sister, Betty Fry (Placerville, CA), her children, Pam Fisher '69 (John), Rick Maida (Veronica), Stan Maida (Pam) and Sandi Callahan '78 (Neil). Grandchildren Travis and Tate Fisher, Farah Hurdle (Matt), Toby Maida (Jen), McCabe Callahan (Marli), Brianna Oronoz (Reggie), John A. Maida III, 11 great grandchildren, many nieces and nephews.

submitted Jul. 20, 2015 1:36P
Beverly Honzel

Beverly Jane Honzel passed away Oct. 6, 2015, in her Lake Oswego home. Bev was born June 21, 1930, as the only child to Leona (Robertson) and Thomas Brown Young in Klamath Falls. After graduating from Klamath Union High School in 1949, she attended San Jose State College. Beverly married Andrew Honzel Jr. '53 in 1953, and they made an extraordinary team. Soon they were joined by sons, Mark '76 and Drew '78, followed by daughter, Karen. Bev was a selfless and devoted wife and mother. She was an exceptional cook and hostess, and delighted in friends becoming extended family. She created a home that welcomed all who entered. Bev was in every sense of the word a true gentlewoman. She was a trusted and loving partner to her husband of 61 years, Andy. Bev was a kind and loyal friend, always thoughtful and generous. Beverly was preceded in death by her son, Mark, and is survived by her beloved husband, Andy of Lake Oswego; son, Drew (Betsy) of Klamath Falls; daughter, Karen Musica (Mike) of Tacoma; grandchildren, Tyler Honzel (Nicole), Jack Honzel, Dana Angelos '10 (Greg), Hannah, Tory and Ellie Honzel, and Ali and Eric Musica; and two great-grandchildren.

submitted Nov. 9, 2015 1:55P


Robert Valentine


Robert Ortiz Valentine '43 died on the afternoon of Aug. 13, 2015, of complications from pneumonia, in Belvedere, CA, where he resided with his family for nearly 50 years. His passing was serene and peaceful and pain-free.

Bob was born on July 12,1921, in San Mateo, CA., the oldest son of Aloysius Ignatius Valentine and Elena Ortiz, and was a fourth-generation Californian. He was raised in the Excelsior District in San Francisco with two younger siblings, Richard and Elena. As a young boy Robert spent his summers either at the Russian River or in the coastal Santa Lucia mountains where his maternal grandfather (Felix Ortiz) was a Basque rancher and farmer.

He graduated in 1939 from St. Ignatius High School, and then attended Santa Clara University receiving a Bachelor Degree in Civil Engineering. During his senior year, Bob and his ROTC classmates were conscripted and sent to Fayetteville, NC, for basic training, followed by Officer's Training at Fort Sill, OK. He was then shipped out to Europe for the post war occupation period where he was stationed in Gorizia, Italy, with the 88th Blue Devil Artillery Division.

Following his return home, Bob received a masters degree in Civil Engineering and Business from Stanford University in 1949.

After graduation from Stanford, Bob was employed as an engineer with the bridge-building firm of Judson-Pacific-Murphy which built the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, among several others. In 1955, Bob was part of the engineering team that installed the lateral stabilizing system for the Golden Gate Bridge.

In the 1950s and early 1960s, Bob pursued the bachelor life in San Francisco, with particular interest in his service as "Dean of Women" for the Tuesday Downtown Operators and Observers (TDOs) whose primary focus was inviting young single women to lunch with them on Tuesdays at the Canterbury Hotel. ...perhaps the precursor to the match.coms of today. Bob also was one of the handful of skiers who discovered the Squaw Valley mountain area (and its apres-ski life) early on in the 1950s. He built a ski cabin there in time for the 1960 Olympics where he worked as a timekeeper.

Bob started his own engineering and construction firm, Valentine Corporation, in 1965. Today, fifty years later, the firm still operates from its headquarters in San Rafael, CA. with distinction.

He married Madeleine "Lani" Stephens on Valentine's Day in 1966. He is survived by his wife, and two children, Ellen Story Valentine Thompson '89 (John), and Robert O. Valentine, Jr. '91 (Ashley), and four granddaughters, Elise and Jules Thompson, and Laura and Emelia Valentine. His sister, Elena Valentine Corbett, of Medford, OR, also survives, plus numerous nephews and nieces. His brother, Richard, pre-deceased him.

In 1987 Bob and Lani purchased acreage in southern Mendocino County of 100 acres of planted Cabernet Sauvignon grapes. Over the years he sold grape contracts to numerous wineries, and as an amateur winemaker himself, prided himself on winning numerous medal awards. A commercial wine venture under the label "Valentine Vineyards" was also developed, and to Bob's great delight, his 2003 Cabernet won Best of California at the prestigious Sacramento State Fair competition.

Bob was a past director of the Association of General Contractors of California, a fellow of the American Society of Civil Engineers, a former director of the Olympic Club, and a former director of Fort Mason Foundation.


submitted Aug. 21, 2015 4:00P

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