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Showing obituaries submitted in the last year

1940

UGRD Engineering '40
William "Al" Wolff

William Alvord "Al" Wolff '40 passed away in his sleep Sept. 6, 2014, at Maravilla in Santa Barbara, Calif., with family at his side. Al, as he was called, was born in San Francisco on Nov. 18, 1917 to William Alvord Wolff, Sr. and Debora Jones Wolff. He was the second oldest of 6 children. All of his siblings pre-deceased him as did his first wife of 49 years, Marcella Jensen Wolff and his second wife of 18 years, Connie Duckworth Wolff.

Al always credited his youthful experience selling newspapers on the street corners of San Francisco from 1927 to 1934 for his later success in the business world. He and his brother called it a good evening when they would bring home $1.00 having sold 100 papers at a profit of 1 cent apiece.
 
Though he only played football for Mission High School in his senior year, and that only because his coach promised to help him get a college scholarship, he was named to the San Francisco All Star Team and offered scholarships to Stanford, UC Berkeley, and Santa Clara University. Al chose Santa Clara because they would pay not only for tuition, room, and board but books as well. He played well enough to win an All American designation for two years, one of them awarded by consensus. His team went on to win back-to-back Sugar Bowl titles in 1936 and '37 and he was offered a pro football contract by the Chicago Cardinals, which he declined. As he stated many times, "I played football in college to get an education, not to get my brains scrambled!" After graduating with a degree in mechanical engineering, Al continued to show his appreciation and dedication to the University of Santa Clara as coach and a founding member of the Bronco Bench Foundation and a Regent of the university for 10 years.
 
After college, Al got a job working for US Steel for 5 years and then went to work for FMC of San Jose where he spent the rest of his corporate life. He worked his way up the ladder by never refusing an opportunity and always preparing himself for a new role. Moving with his family to Houston, Texas, he became president of Oil Center Tool and Die, now a part of FMC Technologies. He managed that company so well that he was called back to corporate headquarters. Once there, he moved into the international arena for FMC, setting up some 18 or more plants in various countries throughout the world. He retired in 1982 as Senior VP of the corporation.
 
With his first wife, Marcella Jensen, Al had three children, Sherry, and twins Diane and Bill. All three survive him as do their children Sara Rushing Powell and Jill Rushing Fonte as well as Christian Anderson and Emily Anderson Allen. He was also the proud great-grandfather of eight: Augusta, Ben and Will Powell-Rushing; Leo and Marco Fonte; Ellamae and Ayla Allen; and Bryce Anderson. Al was pre-deceased by grandson Travis P. "Tip" Rushing. He is also survived by one step-daughter and 2 step-grandchildren from his second marriage.
submitted Oct. 30, 2014 9:05A

1942

'42
Lee Seemann

Long before he became an early Warren Buffett investor and a wealthy philanthropist, Lee Seemann '42 was a 23-year-old from Omaha piloting a B-17 over Germany. Seemann, a decorated war hero who often called himself “an incredibly lucky guy,” died on June 2, 2015, in Omaha. He was 95.

Seemann was born May 10, 1920, in Minnesota, but his father, a car dealer, soon moved the family to Omaha. Lee attended Dundee Elementary and Central High, class of ’38. At 6-foot-1 and 210 pounds, he played football at Santa Clara University in California, where he took part in ROTC and was president of the senior class. After World War II, in which he survived a number of close calls, he met Willa Davis, who immediately liked him.

Seemann bombed the Normandy coast on D-Day, June 6, 1944, and flew his final mission on Aug. 9. Some 30,000 American airmen based in England died in the war, but Seemann enjoyed Thanksgiving dinner with his mother in Omaha.

He received the Silver Star, the Distinguished Flying Cross (twice), the Purple Heart and the Air Medal with four oak leaf clusters. He recounts his harrowing tales in his 1998 memoir with David Harding, titled I Thought We Were Goners.

Lee became a branch manager at International Harvester and later started his own business, Seemann Truck and Trailer.Willa’s father was a prominent Omaha urologist, Dr. Edwin Davis. He and the Seemanns, still in their 20s, invested with Buffett in the late 1950s and built large fortunes. Over the years, Lee and Willa Seemann have donated quietly to universities, hospitals, museums, churches and other charities. In the 1990s, they were major contributors to the Strategic Air & Space Museum. They also donated to his high school, and a decade ago Central named its new football facility Seemann Stadium.

 

The couple raised four children, but suffered the death of daughter Jane Seemann in a 1988 car crash in Omaha.
 

In 2000, Seemann underwent heart bypass surgery. In recent times he was in hospice care, and his wife said he died from various old-age ailments.

 

Besides his wife, he is survived by sons Lee Seemann Jr. of Omaha and Scott of Washington state; and daughter Ann Drickey of Palm Springs, California.
submitted Aug. 4, 2015 8:23A

1943

UGRD Leavey Business '43
Jack Matthews

John "Jack" Goodspeed Matthews ’43, J.D. ’49 was 93 and passed away peacefully on Dec. 23, 2014.

Jack was born in Hollywood, California. He attended Loyola High School in Los Angeles where he was succeeded academically and athletically. He earned a scholarship to Santa Clara University and again distinguished himself there as an outstanding student and football player. He fell in love with Anna Jean Thomas. He and "Annie" both went on to enlist in the army. They were married in Texas in 1944 before they both went to the South Pacific to serve their country during the war. Following the war, Jack and Annie lived in the University’s Veterans’ Village as they began their family and he attended SCU Law School. Annie and Jack made their home first in Saratoga and then in Campbell, where they raised their six daughters. Jack practiced law in San Jose and was active in parish and church activities. He was a competitive golfer and enjoyed the game throughout his life. Jack and Annie also enjoyed the many years they shared with their beloved friends.
 
Jack is remembered for his passion for justice, humor, and his love of Annie and his girls. This same love animated his relationships with all the family. Jack was known for his sharp intellect and keen sense of humor. To his last days he retained a unique ability to play and win at blackjack, regardless of his health.
 
Jack is survived by his and Annie's six daughters: Patricia Kaplan (David), Mary Souza (David), Cece Carr, Kathleen Matthews (Robin Baker), Jackie Matthews (Kurt Magnuson), and Peggie Robinson (Richard), who works in the Cowell Center Student Health Services. He is fondly remembered by his grandchildren: Shannon Lucas-Souza ’93, Joshua Souza, Erin Santana J.D. ’06, Drew Carr, Jodie Walberg, Josie Randles, Cory Randles, Jamie Robinson ’11, and Kerry Robinson and his great-grandchildren: Sierra and Makaia Souza, and Samantha Walberg, and all the family members.
 
Sympathy notes may be sent to:
Matthews Family
c/o Peggie Robinson
Cowell Center
submitted Jan. 14, 2015 1:10P

1944

'44
Frank M. Belick

Frank M. Belick '44, resident of San Jose, passed away on July 13, 2014. He touched countless lives through his pioneering work in water pollution control, as well as through offering a helping hand to those in need. Frank was born of Croatian parents in Los Angeles in 1922. The family moved to the Santa Clara Valley in 1934 in search of agricultural work. Amidst farm chores, he attended old Santa Clara High School, then obtained a civil engineering degree by study at San Jose State College and Santa Clara University, graduating cum laude in 1944. He conducted the first water quality studies to assess the polluted south San Francisco Bay for the City of San Jose in 1947. He was chosen to lead and implement San Jose's first wastewater control plant in 1956, becoming Engineer-Manager of this nationally recognized, technologically advanced treatment facility. He retired in 1981 as a Deputy Director of Public Works. Frank was predeceased by his wife Charlotte in 2009 after 58 years of marriage. He is survived by his children Tom Belick (Margaret) of Palo Alto and Denise Binderup (Tim) of Bellingham, Washington, grandchildren Chloe and Emma of Seoul, and sister Agnes of Berkeley. His help to friends, co-workers, relatives, and neighbors will be missed by all.

submitted Sep. 15, 2014 11:41A
'44
Frank Giansiracusa

Frank Joseph Giansiracusa ’44 passed away peacefully at Saratoga Retirement Community on November 1, 2014, with family at his bedside. Frank was born July 22, 1922, in San Jose and lived his entire life in the Bay Area. He graduated from Bellarmine College Prep and obtained a full scholarship to Santa Clara University. He received his medical degree in 1946 from the University of California, San Francisco, where he met and married the love of his life, Bernice Freericks. He practiced internal medicine with special interest in cardiology for 40 years, serving Santa Clara Valley from his office across the street from O'Connor Hospital. He was active in the medical community serving as president of the medical staff at O'Connor Hospital in 1963 and was instrumental in establishing their first Coronary Care Unit. He was a member of the American Medical Association and active at the state level as a delegate of the Santa Clara County Medical Society for many years. He maintained his interest in medicine and regularly attended continuing medical education conferences well after retiring. Frank was proud of his Sicilian heritage and enjoyed monthly Amici d'Oro luncheons. His other passions included his family, golf, the Monterey Bay area, reading, monitoring the stock market, and following the 49ers.
He was preceded in death by his parents Salvatore and Cecilia (Accardi) Giansiracusa, brother Joseph Giansiracusa ’41, and wife of 64 years Bernice (Freericks) Giansiracusa MD. He is survived by children Richard (Ellen), Anne (Michael) and Susan Giansiracusa, grandchildren Jennifer (Ron) and Kathryn (Dave) Giansiracusa, cousin Michael (Edie) Giansiracusa, sister-in-law Loreene Giansiracusa ’41, nephews Robert, David, Joseph Jr., Adam, and niece, Elisabeth.

submitted Nov. 7, 2014 1:21P

1947

'47
Peter C. Dolcini

Peter Connolly Dolcini '47 February 27, 1925, to November 4, 2014. A man deeply connected with the land of West Marin County, Peter died peacefully, at home, with his wife of 65 years, Louise, at his side. Peter was a talented man, well versed in chemistry, biology, physics, astronomy, creative writing and languages, but that does not begin to scratch the surface of who he was. A deeply spiritual, generous and accepting man, Peter made friends wherever he and Louise travelled, whether to Italy or to the local dry cleaners in Petaluma. His wry sense of humor and thoughtful intelligence enlivened many discussions and family parties.

Peter had a long and varied work life. He worked on his family ranch and dairy as a young man. After graduating from Santa Clara University, Peter was employed as a forensic chemist in Berkeley, CA, performing top secret tests on air samples from Soviet atomic test sites. He then built and ran a family business with his brothers and cousins in Stockton, CA: All Jersey Farms Drive-In Dairy. He also used his chemistry and dairy background to make and sell delicious ice cream at his own ice cream parlor, The Gold Mine. After his Stockton sojourn, Peter and Louise moved their family of six children, Lucille, Tom (Carlene), Marilyn (Herm), Carol (Abram), Elaine, and Barbara (Michael), back to his beloved West Marin. They settled into 50+ years of a happy life in Hicks Valley, where Peter worked in the dairy and beef ranching business with his brothers and cousins. It was, however, as a teacher that he was able to put into practice his true vocation. Peter and Louise teamed up as Principal (Louise) and Teacher's Aide (Peter) at the local one-room Lincoln District Elementary School.

After retirement, Peter spent many happy years gardening, birding, travelling, studying Spanish and Italian, and especially enjoying being a part of the unfolding lives of his children, in-laws, grandchildren, great-grandchildren, brothers and sisters, nieces, nephews, cousins, neighbors and friends. He was a remarkable man who honed and polished, without effort and with great love, the magic of the double-sided coin of learning and teaching. He loved a good gathering, loved the land of West Marin, and most of all loved Louise and his family. We will miss him every day. 

submitted Dec. 8, 2014 6:58P

1948

UGRD Engineering '48
John K. Nunneley

John Kerwin "Jack" Nunneley '48 was born on October 19, 1927. He passed away on November 11, 2014, in the loving care of his family. He was 87 years young. A third-generation native Californian, Jack was raised on an apricot and prune ranch in Saratoga. He attended Los Gatos High School and Santa Clara University before being appointed to the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis. There, he met and married the love of his life, Cynthia Ainsworth Flynn.

He served in the Navy from 1951-81 and was qualified to command nuclear submarines. His final tour was as the commander of the Mare Island Naval Base, where he had previously been stationed in 1966 to commission and become the first commander of the USS Mariano G. Vallejo (SSBN-658), a ballistic-missile submarine. Those who knew Jack remember his many, often hilarious, stories about life at sea and the camaraderie of those who serve together.

After retiring from the Navy, Jack pursued his passion for community service and was very active in the United Way, Rotary Club, and other philanthropic activities. He moved to Scotts Valley in 2008 after the untimely loss of Cynthia to live with his son, John Jr.. He is survived by his three loving children, Catherine, Cynthia Nunneley ’75, and John Nunneley Jr. M.S. ’80, seven grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren. He will be missed and always loved by all who knew him.

submitted Dec. 8, 2014 6:35P

1949

GRD Engineering '49
Philip G. Rizzo

November 26, 2013 marked the passing of Philip G. Rizzo M.S. '49, 89, of St. Augustine. A beloved husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather, and devout Catholic, Phil was truly of The Greatest Generation, born in San Jose, California, and serving four years in the Army Air Force during World War II. He is survived by his wife Alene M. Rizzo, with whom he recently celebrated their 66th wedding anniversary.

He utilized his Masters in Mechanical Engineering from Santa Clara University to good advantage during his 32 year career in management at American Can Company. He loved his family, was an avid golfer, musician, and dog-lover. He enjoyed life, loved people, and those he met knew he had a genuine interest in them. One of the distinct honors in his life was being able to help President Ronald Reagan celebrate his 79th, 80th, and 81st birthdays. In 2012, he and Alene left his beloved California to live with his family in Florida, and became members of San Juan del Rio Catholic Church.

He is survived by: Six children Paul (Nancy) Rizzo of Portland, Ore., Carol (John) Scherer of St. Augustine, Fla., Thomas Rizzo of Houston, Texas, Ricci (Tamara) Rizzo of Boston, Mass.,  Rion (Yvonne) Rizzo of Atlanta, Ga.,  Darren Rizzo of Newport Beach, Calif.;  seven grandchildren Justin (Amanda) Barney, Nathan (Kelly) Scherer, Christopher (Lacey) Rizzo, Dustin Rizzo, Lisa (Christopher) Stone, Brian Rizzo, Danielle Rizzo; five great grandchildren Leah Scherer, Landon Barney, Levi Scherer, Savannah Barney, Mason Stone; as well as many extended family members, and hundreds of friends from coast to coast.

submitted Nov. 30, 2014 1:44P
GRD Law '49
Jack Matthews
see year 1943
'49
Daniel Cunha

Daniel Cunha ’49 passed away on September 12, 2014, in his home in Felton, California, at the age of 91. He attended Santa Clara University in the 1940s, after serving as a Navy pilot in WWII. He was one of the first baptisms in the Santa Clara mission after it was rebuilt. His first wife (who passed away) was Violet "Sue" Cunha. He is survived by his wife, Sybil "Dandy" Cunha, five children, nine grandchildren—including Kathryn Gulland ’09—seven great-grandchildren, many in-laws, and two siblings. He was an engineer, craftsman, and a wonderful friend, neighbor, great-grandfather, grandfather, father-in-law, father, brother, and husband.

submitted Sep. 14, 2014 12:12P

Faculty & Staff

'ff
Tenny Wright

On June 17, longtime profressor of religious studies Tennant (Tenny) Wright, S.J., '63 STL (Licentiate in Sacred Theology) died at the age of 87. He was born in Los Angeles on September 16, 1927, the son of Tennant C. Wright, Sr., a film director and Warner Brothers executive, and Marion McMahon Wright.

Wright graduated from Loyola High School, Los Angeles, and after earning his BA in English at Loyola Marymount University, he entered the Jesuit novitiate at Los Gatos in 1950. He earned further degrees in English at Gonzaga University, theology at Santa Clara, and pursued graduate studies in religious studies at the University of Chicago. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1962.

His 58-year association with Santa Clara University began as an instructor in English, 1956-1959. After ordination, he returned to Santa Clara as teacher of theology, 1964-1967, and senior lecturer of religious studies, 1969-2008. Following his formal retirement from teaching he continued to teach and keep active in ministry. For many years he spent one semester a year teaching Religious Studies at St. John's College, Belize, and doing pastoral ministry there.

Tenny was a man of many interests. His concern with social justice issues resulted in correspondence with presidents, prime ministers, members of Congress, and activists. His interest in literature resulted in a long time correspondence with Graham Greene. He also taught for a brief time in Xiamen, China, studied Zen Buddhism in Japan, and he served the Diocese of San Jose in his ministry to incarcerated youth and their families as well as to the Emmaus Community of LGBT Catholics. He also published articles and op-ed pieces in a number of newspapers and periodicals on a variety of religious and social subjects.

submitted Jun. 28, 2015 5:14P
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Stan Hayden

Former SCU Regent Stanley David Hayden '63 was born Nov. 22, 1941, passed away on Dec. 16, 2014 at his home in San Marino, Calif. with his family by his side. He was survived by his wife of 49 years, Marcia; his four children, Katie (Willy), William "Bill" Hayden ’91 (Lindsay), Maggie Hayden Dietz ’94, and David Hayden ’96 (Shana); and his nine grandchildren, Molly, Will and Maggie Marsh; Will III and Matthew Hayden; Abbey and Henry Dietz; and Grace and Emma Hayden.

Stan was a native Angeleno and had been a resident of the San Gabriel Valley for over 35 years. He attended Loyola High School in Los Angeles and received his bachelors and masters degrees in Sociology and Child Development from The University of Southern California. He went on to teach Sociology and Child Psychology at Mt. San Antonio College in Walnut for 18 years, later leaving academia to join his father's investment company, William R. Hayden and Associates. 

A life long philanthropist and deeply committed to Catholic education, Stan served on the boards of Mayfield Junior School, Mayfield Senior School and Loyola High School, as well as on the Board of Regents (1973-1983) of Santa Clara University , where he attended before transferring to and graduating from The University of Southern California.


He was a former member of the Board of Directors of the Catholic Education Foundation in Los Angeles, and had served as president of Catholic Charities among other leadership roles. Stan, along with his wife and children, served on the Board of Directors of The William R. and Virginia Hayden Foundation, started by his father, William Rube Hayden.

A devoted husband, father and grandfather, Stan loved spending time with his family and close friends, through travel, golf and his various charitable endeavors. At the heart of Stan's life was his love for his family, friends and his Catholic faith. A "Man for Others" (Loyola Graduate '59) who lived out the motto, "Actions Not Words", Stan supported many Catholic schools and charities throughout the Archdiocese. 

Heaven has gained a true jewel of our community and, most of all, we have an advocate in Heaven, as he has now joined the Communion of Saints.

submitted Jan. 9, 2015 12:54P
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Mary T. Pasetta

Mary T. Pasetta, born Oct. 7, 1914, a longtime SCU Bookstore employee, passed away on May 5, 2015 at the age of 100. Mary worked for 40 years for the University. She enjoyed helping the students find books in the bookstore. She always had a smile on her face and a twinkle in her eye. She is survived by her son, Robert Pasetta (Patti), her daughter, Janis Neth, and grandchildren, Jason Neth and Christina Pasetta...also many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by her beloved husband, Dan Pasetta. May she rest in peace.

submitted May. 16, 2015 10:25P
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Leo V. English Jr.

Dr. Leo Victor English Jr. died peacefully at home surrounded by family. Leo was born December 31, 1919, to Dr. Leo V English and Elizabeth Baker English in Toledo, Ohio. He graduated from the University of Toledo, 1940; Howard University Medical School, 1944. While practicing medicine in Detroit Michigan he was drafted into the Korean War as Captain Leo Victor English Jr. and served 2 ½ years in Alaska.

In 1954 Dr. English decided to settle in San Jose with his family.  Upon the move to San Jose he was unable to rent an office in medical building or buy the home of his liking. He bought a home near San Jose Hospital converted the front to a medical office and the back to the home for the family. Later in his career Dr. English and three associates formed an HMO where he served as medical director.

Community involvement included: 1960-1961 President of the San Jose branch of the NAACP; San Jose Police Chief’s Advisory Board; Santa Clara County Grand Jury. 1965 Leo and his wife Juanita were instrumental in finding summer housing for Selma, Alabama students. Recognition and awards include: 1991 Roll of Honor Citation Howard University Student Non-Violent, Direct Action to Desegregate Restaurants and Interstate Buses Washington D.C. in 1943 and 1944; 1959 “Distinguished Citizen Award” from San Jose City Council; 1964 “Annual Service Award” for outstanding and distinguished service in the field of human relations from the Anti-Defamation League Council of San Jose B’nai B’rith; 1972-1977 Santa Clara University board of Regents; 2002 Martin Luther King association of Santa Clara County, Good Neighbor Award.

Dr. English was a member of the Serra Club, which fosters and promotes vocations to the catholic priesthood. Dr. English was a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity and co-founder of Gamma Chi Boule in San Jose. He enjoyed traveling with his family and assisting his sons in 4-H club animal projects. Leo is survived by his loving wife Juanita MA '75 of San Jose California, four sons: Leo English III (Karen); Isaac English (Sonia), James English '75 (Mary '76, MA '79) and Paul English (Steven). He is also survived by 5 grandchildren and 11 great grandchildren.

submitted Apr. 10, 2015 3:16P
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John Merryman

An internationally renowned expert on art and cultural property law as well as comparative law, John Henry Merryman, dedicated his life to the study and teaching of law at Stanford, influencing generations of lawyers and art historians here and around the world from the time he joined the law faculty in 1953 until his death this week at the age of 95. Before that he was faculty at Santa Clara University from 1948 to 1956.

“John Merryman was a giant in several fields — comparative law and the field he helped create, art and the law,” said M. Elizabeth Magill, the Richard E. Lang Professor of Law and dean of Stanford Law School. “He was a devoted teacher and mentor to his students. He taught his last class, “Stolen Art,” only a couple months ago, and helped launch the careers of many of our graduates who work at the intersection of the arts and the law.”

Merryman, the Nelson Bowman Sweitzer and Marie B. Sweitzer Professor of Law, Emeritus, and Affiliated Professor in the Department of Art, Emeritus, died on Aug. 3, 2015 at the age of 95 of natural causes at his home in Palo Alto, Calif. Details of a memorial service are not yet available, but one is expected to be held in the fall.

Pioneering the Study of Art Law

“In 1970 no one spoke of art law as a field for serious study or even as a subject for teaching. That art law is today recognized internationally as being essential to every country interested in protecting its cultural patrimony, by every American art museum as vital to the proper conduct of its trustees and by all artists as protecting their rights, is due in large measure to the publications and teachings of John Henry Merryman,” wrote the late art historian and Stanford Professor Albert Elsen in a 1987 Stanford Law Review tribute to Merryman, “Founding the Field of Art Law.”

Merryman introduced the idea for the new course “Law, Ethics and the Visual Arts,” in 1970 to a somewhat skeptical law faculty. Merryman taught the course in 1971, the first of its kind. Elsen collaborated and co-taught with Merryman — the two delving into questions of tax, copyright, contracts, regulation, cultural property, ethics and more — creating a syllabus for the nascent field of study and publishing the groundbreaking book Law, Ethics and the Visual Arts, now in its fourth edition.

Before that, Merryman was a comparative law scholar of international standing. “His great book on The Civil Law Tradition caused a fundamental rethinking of comparative law and subsequent scholarship — and courses based on that scholarship — were powerfully strengthened as a result,” said Thomas Ehrlich, dean of Stanford Law School from 1971 until 1976. “John’s many works relating to art and cultural property, as well as his multiple courses in that arena, were no less groundbreaking. He deployed his strengths in comparative law to produce penetrating analyses on the ownership of antiquities, as well as on art and the law more generally. Students from across the Stanford campus and beyond flocked to John’s classes. John was one-of-a-kind, as colleague and as dear friend.”

Merryman was truly an international scholar who was both a Guggenheim Fellow and a Fulbright Research Professor at the Max Planck Institute. His expertise in comparative law and art law led to visiting positions at universities in Mexico, Greece, Italy, Germany and Austria. He was president of the International Cultural Property Society and on the editorial board for various publications, including theInternational Journal of Cultural Propertyand the American Journal of Comparative Law.

He received numerous international prizes and honors over the course of his career, including the Order of Merit of the Italian Republic and honorary doctorates from Aix-en-Provence, Rome (Tor Vergata), and Trieste, and was celebrated in two Festschriften: “Comparative and Private International Law: Essays in Honor of John Henry Merryman on His Seventieth Birthday” and “Legal Culture in the Age of Globalization: Latin America and Latin Europe.”

In 2004 he received the American Society of Comparative Law’s Lifetime Achievement Award “for his extraordinary scholarly contribution over a lifetime to comparative law in the United States.”

“John was for all of us a model of civility and old-world charm. He bore with unfailing grace the mounting burdens of age, continuing to write and teach deep into his retirement,” said George Fisher, the Judge John Crown Professor of Law and faculty co-director of the Stanford Criminal Prosecution Clinic. “And he never lost his generous interest in the work of his friends and colleagues. He was a scholar for the ages.”

“He was a truly innovative scholar, ahead of his time throughout his long career,” said Lawrence M. Friedman, the Marion Rice Kirkwood Professor of Law.

Merryman’s expertise in and enthusiasm for art benefited Stanford beyond the reach of his scholarship. In the 1970s, when the law school was building its “new” campus, he chaired the design committee.

“When the law school moved from the Quad to its new home in 1975, John undertook to use his art expertise to persuade some of the best graphic printmakers to lend major works of art to the Law School where they became the best art collection at Stanford apart from the Museum,” recalled Ehrlich. “He identified a stunning Barbara Hepworth sculpture [titled “Four Square (Walk Through)”] to borrow as the centerpiece of the school’s courtyard, and when the loan was up he arranged a gift of the elegant Calder sculpture that replaced it (titled “Le Faucon”). In honor of his many contributions to art, a good friend and admirer gave Stanford one of the largest and most handsome sculptures on the campus, created by Mark di Suvero.”

The di Suvero sculpture, “The Sieve of Eratosthenes,” was, according to a Stanford press release from March 2000, donated to Stanford by Daniel Shapiro and Agnes Gund, who wished to honor Merryman “by thanking him for all he has done for us and everyone interested in art by giving a gift in his honor to Stanford of a work of an artist that John thought was sorely missing on campus. And so now, because of John, there is Mark di Suvero’s ‘The Sieve of Eratosthenes,’ the work of a great artist to celebrate a great teacher and friend of art.”

Early Enthusiasm for Music and the Arts

Born in Portland, Ore., on Feb. 24, 1920, Merryman studied chemistry at the University of Portland and received a B.S. in chemistry in 1943. He continued his study of chemistry, receiving an M.S. from the University of Notre Dame in 1944, but then switched to law. He received a J.D. from the University of Notre Dame in 1947. NYU School of Law provided him with a teaching fellowship and the opportunity to continue his legal studies and he received his LLM in 1950 and JSD in 1955. He taught law at Santa Clara University (then called the University of Santa Clara) and joined the Stanford Law faculty in 1953.

Merryman also was a professional, card-carrying musician, financing his early education by playing piano in a dance band he formed called John Merryman and His Merry Men. He continued to play piano throughout his life, sharing his enthusiasm for music and the arts at Stanford.

“John and his wonderful late wife, Nancy, were friends of my wife Ellen and me for over 50 years, since we first came to Stanford in 1965, as they were friends of countless others — literally from around the world,” recalled Ehrlich. “John had a joyful spirit that illuminated not just every conversation of which he was a part, but every room where he was present. He was a wonderful piano player of Broadway show hits, jazz and much more. John was a learner, and he was able to share his learning with his friends with such a twinkle in his eye that you quite forgot that he was really teaching you and helping along while telling riotously funny tales.”

That early enthusiasm barely dimmed in retirement, as he continued to publish — and to teach. “Stolen Art,” which he taught in fall 2014, was a new course he had recently developed, likely the first of its kind.

“Some years ago I had the pleasure of ‘taking’ John’s oral history. I was struck by the satisfying life revealed in his reminiscences, full of intellectual challenge and warm communal interchange,” said Barbara Allen Babcock, the Judge John Crown Professor of Law, Emerita. “He was an inspiration.”

While his scholarship was international, it was perhaps most keenly felt at Stanford.

“In my 30 years as a faculty member at this remarkable place, John Merryman was clearly one of the most remarkable of my colleagues,” recalled Henry “Hank” T. Greely, the Deane F. and Kate Edelman Johnson Professor of Law. “Hired here as the law librarian, he managed not one but two spectacular scholarly careers, the first as one of the leading comparative law scholars in the world and then later as one of the world’s very top ‘art and the law’ scholars. His civil law work led to him being named an Italian knight — un Cavaliero della Republica Italiana. Which brings to mind an even more important point about John. He was always a gentlemen: gracious, helpful, self-deprecating. I would say that they aren’t making them like John Merryman anymore, but they (almost) never did. He was a great scholar, a wonderful colleague and a very good person. I miss him.”

“John was a treasured colleague. We all sought his advice on a range of subjects because of his incisive mind, his wit and his insight. The world is a less interesting and elegant place without John,” said Magill. “We all mourn the passing of this wonderful man, who was a class act in every respect.”

Merryman is survived by three step-children, Leonard P. Edwards, Samuel D. Edwards and Bruce H. Edwards; four step-grandchildren; and five great step-grandchildren. His wife, Nancy Edwards Merryman, passed away in January. 

 

submitted Aug. 11, 2015 9:40A
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Ian Murray

Ian Murray, emeritus professor of mechanical engineering (1951-1988) and father of Barbara Murray, professor of theatre and dance, died on March 30. At 92 years old, Ian lived a long and full life, much of it spent serving at Santa Clara University. He was active in his profession as author, teacher and researcher while also dedicating time to the University community in numerous ways. He served as Faculty Senate president and was an active member of Tau Beta Pi, the national engineering honor society, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Among his creative achievements, Ian merged his passion for sailing with his academic expertise in thermodynamics and fluid mechanics to develop the course, Dynamics of Sailing, in the 1960s. 

 
Together with Barbara and her family, we mourn Ian's death and recall the gift he was to his family, friends, colleagues and students.
 
Notes of condolence may be sent to Barbara Murray, Theatre and Dance Department.
 
A celebration of Ian's life will be held: 
Saturday, April 25, 1:00-4:00p.m.
Union Church of Cupertino
20900 Stevens Creek Boulevard
Cupertino, CA 95014
submitted Apr. 17, 2015 12:55P
'ff
Carl Hayn, S.J.

Longtime Professor of Physics Carl Hayn, S.J. died at the age of 98  in Los Gatos on Oct. 21, 2014.

He was born July 13, 1916, in Los Angeles and graduated from Loyola High School. He entered the Jesuit novitiate at Los Gatos in September 1933. Following studies at Gonzaga University, Spokane, he taught physics and mathematics at Loyola High School, 1940-43 and engineering physics at the Army training program at Loyola University (Los Angeles), 1943-44. Theological studies were made at Alma College, Los Gatos, and Carl was ordained a priest in 1947. In 1955 he received his Ph.D. in Physics from St. Louis University where he worked in experimental solid state physics. Subsequently, he engaged in postdoctoral work at the Oak Ridge Institute of Nuclear Studies and pursued further studies in nuclear physics at Washington State University. Carl served as president of the Northern California/Nevada section of the American Association of Physics Teachers and published articles in The American Journal of Physics and The Physics Teacher.

Carl's lifetime (and much beloved) ministry was in the physics classroom at Santa Clara University beginning in 1955. He taught full time for more than 50 years, retiring in 2006 when partial hearing loss made classroom teaching more difficult. Devotedly and enthusiastically, however, he continued his daily trips to the physics lab to tutor students and to spend time with his dear colleagues. Carl's regular pastoral ministry included daily 6:00 am Mass celebrated in the Mission Church and priestly service to the Carmelite Sisters of Santa Clara, a community of which he was very fond. After his retirement he generously made himself available to the Santa Clara Mission Cemetery for funeral and burial services. In 2012 he moved to Sacred Heart Jesuit Center to undertake the ministry of prayer.

Carl's twin sister, Sister Mary Carolyn Hayn, CSJ, predeceased him.

We shall miss Fr. Hayn as teacher, colleague, minister, and brother to the Jesuit community. Together we recall the great gift of his long and full life.

submitted Oct. 30, 2014 9:55A

Friends of the University

'ty
Margaret M. Casanova

Margaret M. Casanova, born October 1, 1915, passed away peacefully, February 26, 2015, at the age of ninty-nine. Margaret was born and raised in Payette, Idaho. She attended the University of Idaho where she was a member of Delta Gamma sorority. Margaret was a member and great supporter of the Catholic Newman Center at the University where in 2003, she established the Len and Margaret Casanova Scholarship Fund, for students who were active in Newman Center. She also was a lifelong member of the PEO Sisterhood. 

Margaret married Leonard Casanova '27, Bronco Hall of Fame football player and coach 1946-1949, on August 17, 1963. He was also a University of Oregon football coach and athletic director. She was a devoted Duck fan and traveled with the football team until two years before her death. 

What was most important to her were family, friends and faith, he said. She set up the Len & Margaret Casa­nova Scholarship Fund to provide scholarships to UO students who participate in Catholic ministry centers at non-Catholic universities. Casanova was a storyteller, a person who enjoyed life and radiated joy, and students responded to those qualities.
 
Margaret is survived by her sons Thomas, and Daniel, step-daughters, Margot Wells, and Andrea Casanova, grand-children, Kim Macon and Kieron Hathaway, Caroline Kahn '94, Colette McClung, Monica Anderson, and a niece Janet Pence. Known by them as "Great Grandma Duck", she also had eleven great-grandchildren.
submitted Apr. 10, 2015 3:42P
'ty
Gloria Anello

Gloria Giannini "GG" Anello was born January 21, 1922, and died peacefully following a short illness on October 9, 2014, at age 92 in Pacific Grove surrounded by family. Born in Santa Clara to Palmira Pasquinelli and Ralph Giannini, Gloria was the youngest of six children, and was predeceased by her husband, Santa Clara County Superior Court Judge Peter L. Anello, Sr. ’40, J.D. ’48; her son Ralph Giannini Anello; her brothers Peter Giannini ’44 (Florence), Dante (Lee), and Albert (Jean); her sisters Claire Stagnaro (Joseph) and Louise Vasconcellos (Bill).

Gloria attended Santa Clara High School and Stanford University, graduating in 1944 with an AB degree in Economics, certainly not a common course of study for women in those days. Gloria loved to joke that the only reason she went to Stanford was because Santa Clara University did not accept women! Truth be told, she had a lifelong love of Stanford and the wonderful friends she made there. Gloria spent her early adult years and college vacations serving as a hostess at her mother's Italian restaurant, the Lucca Cafe on The Alameda in Santa Clara, a popular gathering place for SCU students. Many longtime happy marriages had their beginnings at Lucca's, including Gloria's 54 year marriage to Peter, then a student at SCU Law School. After the war years, Gloria devoted herself to her growing family of four children, especially to her developmentally disabled daughter, Antoinette. Gloria enjoyed community service, in particular her multiple terms as president of Santa Clara University's Catala Club.

Like her own mother, Gloria was a fabulous cook. An invitation to dine at the Anello home was coveted by all. She was famous for her excellent marinara sauce, minestrone soup, Roman-style artichokes, apple pies, homemade apricot jam, basil pesto, and the best eggplant Parmigiana this side of Italy. Gloria was passionate about lifelong learning, taking continuing education classes in such varied topics as transistor radio construction, mathematics, Italian language and literature and in later years many Elder-hostel trips on European art and history. Gloria's other passion was Carmel-by-the-Sea, and dreamed for years of owning a home there. That dream came true when she purchased the perfect beach cottage in 1971. She was an active member of the altar societies of San Carlos Borromeo de Carmelo (the Carmel Mission) and St. Angela's Parrish in Pacific Grove. Gloria was also a member of the Carmel Foundation, and enjoyed many trips and cultural outings.

Following husband Peter's passing in 1996, Gloria retired to Canterbury Woods in Pacific Grove where she met many new friends and renewed her friendships with Stanford chums and alums. Her choice of Canterbury Woods was a blessing for her family because she was so well cared for in her later years. We will be forever grateful to the amazing staff in assisted living and in the medical center for the love and dedication shown to our mother. Never complaining, always gracious, gentle, elegantly dressed, beautifully coiffed, and genuinely pleasant to all, Gloria practiced what she preached: "If you can't say something nice, don't say anything at all." With a quiet and generous spirit, Gloria's expressions of love for her family and friends were in actions, not words. Gloria' spirit is carried on by her son Peter Louis Anello, Jr. (Margaret Alayne) of Gilroy; her daughters Antoinette of San Anselmo, and Anna-Louise Anello Rosen J.D. ’81 (Mark), her grandsons Jordan and Spencer Rosen, all of San Francisco; many Giannini and Anello nieces and nephews; and her devoted and cherished friends George Rommel of Pacific Grove, Nathan Louie and Dale Picone of San Jose. 

submitted Dec. 3, 2014 9:24A
'ty
Carmel Dolores Malley

Carmel Malley was a loyal and devoted fixture at each and every Bronco football game coached by her husband, longtime SCU coach and athletic director Pat Malley ’53, and son Terry Malley ’73 for 33 years. It’s no legend that she loved and knew each player by name and story. Following Pat’s death, Carmel began her own career, working in the Alumni Office, where she continued to win the hearts of all students. A San Francisco native since her birth in 1932, Carmel was active in philanthropy and exuded “style and class” until her death on Sept. 1. Among her numerous survivors are daughter Kim Bellotti ’79, son-in-law Jerry Bellotti ’75, nephew Jonathan Mallen ’94, and grandchildren Christina Malley ’08, Caitlin Bellotti ’10, and Jerome P. “J.P.” Bellotti ’12. Donations may be mailed to the Pat and Carmel Malley Athletic Scholarship Endowment c/o the Santa Clara Athletic Department.

 

 

submitted Oct. 30, 2014 1:54P

Unknown

'wn
John Marlo

Retired judge John Marlo J.D. '61 died May 26, 2015. Marlo, 81, was the Capitola city attorney before he became a municipal and superior judge from 1973 to 1993. He had a long and varied career, all while raising five children with his wife, Patricia Marlo, in Aptos. Marlo died of Leukemia, his colleagues said.

Marlo graduated from San Jose State in 1956 and became a San Jose police officer for about five years. He earned a law degree at Santa Clara University and was a civil attorney before he became Capitola’s city attorney. After his election to Santa Cruz County Superior Court, Marlo presided over high-profile criminal cases.
 
From the early ’70s, Marlo and his family also ran Aptos Vineyard. Tending its vines provided him with “good therapy” from the rigors of the legal profession, he told the Sentinel in 1993. Marlo also co-founded the Santa Cruz Mountains Winegrowers Association and worked with David Bruce Winery in Los Gatos and Hallcrest Vineyards in Felton.
 
“John was a good businessman, a wonderful lawyer and a great judge,” said Bill Kelsay, a retired Santa Cruz County Superior judge who was also Marlo’s neighbor in Aptos. “He was always upbeat. He had such strong values and was such a good family man. He had a life full of a lot of support and love.”
Marlo taught at Cabrillo College and worked as a mediator and arbitrator at San Jose-based JAMS, which stands for Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Services Inc. It resolves disputes through the services of retired judge and attorneys.
 
Upon his retirement from the bench, Marlo told the Sentinel that he hoped to be remembered for his dignity, fairness and for being firm. He said he wanted to be known as, “Someone who ran a good courthouse and tried to encourage the resolution of disputes.”
 
submitted May. 30, 2015 1:26P

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