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Class Notes | Obituaries

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Showing obituaries submitted in the last year by graduates in the

1953

'53
James E. Chargin

James Edward Chargin ’53 Oct. 2, 2013. He died from complications after he fell in his home. He was 81. Jim Chargin was born in San Jose, Calif., in 1932, the second of seven children to Joseph A. Chargin, Jr., and Ellen X. Laundrie Chargin. After completing his studies at Bellarmine Preparatory and Santa Clara University, he married Patricia Murphy, his longtime sweetheart, in 1955. They moved to Chicago, where he graduated from Stritch School of Medicine at Loyola University in 1957. Dr. Chargin moved with his family to Grass Valley in 1963, and they became members of St. Patrick's Catholic Parish. Dr. Chargin was in private practice in Grass Valley until 2003. He was chief of staff at Sierra Nevada Memorial Hospital for multiple terms. He continued assisting in surgery, especially orthopaedic surgery, until 2008. Dr. Chargin was an avid builder, machinist and do-it-yourselfer. He relished the challenge of fixing broken things of all kinds, rather than replacing them. He loved fishing and introduced all of his children and many of his grandchildren to the joys of camping in the Sierras. Dr. Chargin will be profoundly missed by his family, friends, and colleagues in California and beyond. Dr. Chargin is survived by his wife of 58 years, Pat; his children and their families - Jim, Sherry and Brenna of Nevada City, Katherine of Sebastopol, Peter, Jennifer, William and Emily of Portola Valley, and David, Susan, Patrick and Maria of Tucson, Ariz.

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 8:51P

1954

UGRD Engineering '54
Wilson Wong

Wilson Kwong Sung Wong ’54, Dec. 27, 2010. He was 79, of Honolulu, a retired GTE Hawaiian Tel engineer and an Army veteran. He died in Honolulu. He was born in Wailuku. He is survived by son Edward A., daughter Lynn L.K., brothers Mun King and Raymond K.F., sisters Jane Y.J. and Joan Y.H., and two grandchildren.

submitted May. 22, 2014 11:44A
'54
William F. Caro

William F. Caro '54, J.D. '73. Feb. 26, 2014. Born in San Jose in 1932, Caro inherited his father's devotion to SCU's fabled football history and loved to recount, play-by-play, Santa Clara's heartbreaking 7-6 loss to Stanford in the very first college game he ever attended, as an eight-year-old, on Oct. 12, 1940. Athletic loyalties notwithstandng, he did graduate work at Stanford, earning his M.B.A. in 1960 with an emphasis in marketing. His subsequent career as an advertising media director brought him to agencies in San Francisco and Los Angees and Eventually to Coakley-Heagerty in Santa Clara. He later taught advertising at San Jose State University. Caro spent his retirement years in Santa Clara, not far from where the palm and olive mingle. He occasionally enjoyed an idle hour in the university library researching the glory days of Bronco football. He is survived by his brothers, Robert, S.J. '58, M.Div '70 and Paul '62.

submitted Mar. 25, 2014 10:43P
'54
Ted Connolly

Theodore "Ted" William Connolly '54, former All-Pro San Francisco 49er right guard, peacefully passed in his Gardnerville, Nev., home, on Feb. 24, 2014 from acute mylocytic leukemia. He was 82.

Ted was born the youngest of five children on December 5, 1931 in Oakland, Calif. to parents William Eugene Connolly and Dora Ray Waterman. He attended Piedmont High School 1946-49 where he was All-Alameda County for 3 years in football and track, and lettered in baseball and basketball, hence was inducted into the Piedmont HS Sports Hall of Fame. He attended University of Santa Clara where he was All-Catholic All American tackle in 1951. When Santa Clara dropped football he transferred to Tulsa University, Okla., and graduated in 1953. Ted married his high school sweetheart, Mary Elizabeth Heidt, on April 19, 1954, in Tulsa, Okla., and had five children which they raised in Oakland, Calif. 

Ted achieved his childhood dream and was drafted in the 9th round in 1953 by his home town team - the San Francisco 49ers. He played for the Forty Niners until 1962 - his NFL All-Pro year. After holding out from signing his 1963 49er contact and being fined $100 per day, he showed up to his contact negotiations with his lawyer, Ray Bolton – an unheard of scandalous move for a professional athlete at that time. He was blackballed by ownership and the NFL, but prevailed and was traded to the Cleveland Browns. Ted is credited as one of the first professional athletes to retain legal player representation, opening the door for future athletes. During his one year 1963 season with the Browns, Ted blocked for the legendary running back, Jim Brown, the year Brown broke the all-time 1900 yard rushing record when the NFL schedule included only 14 games. Ted played 92 games in his nine year NFL football career.
 
Taking time off from football career, First Lieutenant Connolly served 18 months in the Air Force Reserve at Hamilton Air Force Base in the military police and as coach of the Air Force football team, ending his active service with a huge win over Army in the Penrose Bowl in 1956. Ted was Honorable Discharged from Air Reserves as Captain on July 1, 1966.
 
“Not being able to support my family of 5 kids with an NFL salary”, he retired from football, and shortly after became Vice President of Development for Grubb & Ellis Real Estate. In 1966 he started Connolly Development, Inc., which developed over 40 shopping centers in California and Nevada. His first shopping center, Bonanza Square in Las Vegas, Nev., is still owned and operated by his family. 
 
Equally committed to civic and community activities, Ted’s service included the Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid of Department of State’s Agency for International Development in Washington, D.C. ; President and Commissioner of the Port of Oakland for 12 years where he participated in completion of numerous international trade agreements and the expansion of the Oakland Airport; Airport Operations International Council; Director of the Alameda County Real Estate Board; Oakland Planning Commission; the Founder of the Oakland’s Mayor Sports Committee; and a founding director of the San Antonio Youth Project. 
 
Pursuing his passion for gourmet food and wine, in the early 70’s he developed Sky Hill Farms ranch in Napa Valley producing gourmet cheeses and yogurts from Nubian goats, and organic produce for local restaurants – one of the first “farm to market” providers in California. 
 
TC, as he was known to friends and family, will forever be remembered for his gregarious nature and love of people - best signified by his very firm, sometimes painful, handshake (taught to him by his Irish father) as he pulled you towards his smiling gray-blue eyes warmly welcoming you into his world. 
 
Theodore William Connolly is survived by his children Mark, Cary Byers (Jerry), Matthew (Sally), Chad, and Amy Katsanos; his grandchildren Wesley, Cole, Bryce, Austin and Dimitri; their supportive mother Mary Connolly, good friend Marjorie McGee, his siblings Francis Alexander and husband Ernie (deceased), Larry and wife Barbara, Norman (deceased)and his wife Deletta, and many loving nieces and nephews. He is also preceded in death by his sister Betty Spivey and husband Bill.
submitted Mar. 24, 2014 11:26A
'54
John Vasconcellos

John Vasconcellos '54, J.D. '59, the famously rumpled bear-of-a-man who served 38 entertaining and volatile years in the state Legislature representing the heart of Silicon Valley, died May 24, 2014. He was 82.

Friends said Vasconcellos, whose kidneys had been failing, died at 12:15 p.m. at his Santa Clara condo.
 
Vasconcellos gained national fame after Republican Gov. George Deukmejian in 1986 signed legislation that created the Democratic Vasconcellos' pet project: The California Task Force to Promote Self-Esteem, Personal and Social Responsibility.
 
A few months later, Doonesbury cartoonist Garry Trudeau spent three weeks mocking the task force, imagining what went on inside flaky-sounding meetings.

While many politicians might have wilted under such enormous teasing, Vasconcellos -- colorful, witty, brilliant, angry, intellectual and elegantly foul of mouth -- turned the insults into a spread in People magazine and countless guest spots on TV and radio discussing the serious value of self-esteem.
"I've gotten more attention in the last several weeks than in the (previous) 20 years," he beamed in a 1987 Los Angeles Times profile.
 
"He had two sides: the legislator who was masterful of money flowing in and out of the Legislature and masterful in getting bills he wanted passed -- even if it took five to six years to get them done," Larry Gerston, a San Jose State political-science professor, said Saturday. Then there "was the humanitarian side. People viewed it as quirky, but he was dead serious.
 
"This was a person of two interesting, different minds, but both thrived."
Vasconcellos, who retired from politics in 2004 after serving 30 years in the Assembly and eight years in the state Senate, never married or had children but was widely revered and surrounded by friends at the end.
 
Lee Quarnstrom, a retired San Jose Mercury News journalist and longtime friend of Vasconcellos, said: "His friends knew him as a truly decent man who always based his politics on the notion that humans are basically good and that public policy that stimulates and encourages the good in humankind -- he called it the politics of trust -- should be the guiding principle for those who make the laws and develop governmental programs and policies."
 
HUMAN POTENTIAL
Many who admired Vasconcellos said he always remained a hard-charging, idealistic liberal who considered himself both a student and teacher of all things political.
 
California Secretary of State Debra Bowen recalled one vital lesson from the year she was a rookie in the Legislature and was trying to sponsor bill that put legislative information online. Capitol players kept calling meetings about the proposal but strategically did not invite Bowen.
 
She asked Vasconcellos what she should do about her disrespectful colleagues. His recommendation: Find out when the meetings are planned and just show up.
 
"I don't think I would have done that without John's advice," said Bowen, suggesting she might have resorted to a nasty war in the Capitol's back halls. "John showed me that I was perfectly entitled to be at those meetings -- and showing up forced the others to realize that too."
 
Bowen said the secrecy halted immediately.
 
Almost from the day of his 1966 election to the state Assembly, Vasconcellos was a thunderous Capitol presence. He was always searching for ways to salve his tempestuous inner demons. And he publicly employed an array of "human-potential movement" therapies, including psychosynthesis and gestalt, hoping to release rage, tension and fear. He was a devotee of the teachings out of Esalen, the Big Sur center of "New Age" consciousness.
In 1970, Vasconcellos began 13 years of practicing bioenergetics with Stanley Keleman. At one point, the therapist told the politician that if he continued the therapy, his inner rage might end up "blowing your entire political career!" But Vasconcellos would not stop the discovery process.
 
"It caused such a fallout that the state Assembly created a team of colleagues who rushed to his side when he and his rage erupted," according to a biographical profile by Vasconcellos' legislative staff. The fellow legislators "held his hands while he blew until he settled down. Eventually, he outgrew both his rage and his need for such support."
 
TOP SCHOLAR
John B. Vasconcellos Jr. was born May 11, 1932, in San Jose. His father was Portuguese, his mother German. Family lore has it that his dad was among the early Portuguese men who jumped ship in Hawaii to find work. That is how young John came to cherish Maui and build a large, extended family on the Hawaiian island.
 
For high school, he boarded at Bellarmine College Preparatory and graduated with top honors. He then trekked minutes up The Alameda to Santa Clara University, where he graduated magna cum laude. After serving two years as an Army lieutenant, he went to law school, also at Santa Clara, graduating in 1959 at the top of his class.
 
During the one year he spent on Gov. Pat Brown's campaign staff in the early '60s, politics were injected into his heart. And from the moment he finally took his first Assembly seat, Vasconcellos was a passionate, quotable and unique character.
 
"People are basically decent -- and given the right kinds of recognition, nurturance, love and support -- will live in constructive ways," he once said.
Throughout the 1970s, Vasconcellos actively lobbied for community-based nonviolent conflict resolution projects and university peace-study programs. He also promoted student representation on all the major governing boards in California higher education, according to the enormous cache of Vasconcellos papers, housed in a special collection at UC Santa Barbara.
 
Vasconcellos left the Assembly in 1996 when he was elected to the state Senate. In 1997, at age 65, he expressed an interest in running for governor, saying: "I'm better prepared than anyone else in terms of knowledge of the issues."
 
He was unapologetic about wanting a more expansive, generous government -- even when he was a budget wonk as chairman of the powerful Assembly Ways and Means Committee. That expertise, plus his devotion to "human potential," made it easy for him to sell himself as a political unifier.
 
"Over the years, I've worked with hundreds of Californians on thousands of projects, bringing people together, from the homeless to high-tech executives," he said at the time. "I have a unique record on that."
 
But perhaps it was all that high self-esteem that led him to soon drop out of the race. "I didn't have the stomach to get on the phone and beg" for money, he admitted after a few months. "My life is too precious."
 
KINDNESS, CARING
 
When term limits ended his Assembly run in 1996, Vasconcellos was also chairman of the ethics committee. After winning the Senate seat, he soon chaired the Public Safety Committee. His "Tough & Smart Public Safety Program" took a preventive approach to public safety, but without making Democrats look soft on crime.
 
In the Senate, he also chaired committees on K-12 and higher education and the Subcommittee on Aging and Long-Term Care. He was known for guiding them both with equal shares of fiscal responsibility, kindness and savvy.
"John was the sort of man whom many, many Californians thought of as a dear friend," Quarnstrom said. "He despaired ... about the state Capitol, a place he truly loved. And yet, it was a place that he always knew needed to get better and do better."
 
Bowen said Vasconcellos taught politicians on both sides of the aisle many important things about doing the job earnestly, while striving for personal growth.
 
Even when he was done with politics, she said, he humorously laid out a thoughtful plan for a positive retirement.
 
"I have three requisites," Bowen remembers Vasconcellos telling her. "I don't want to be cold. I don't want to have a schedule. And, most of all, I don't want to deal with assholes!"
 
Bowen laughed and said, "That answer was just so John."
 
 
submitted May. 30, 2014 4:10P
'54
George C. Fotinos

George Chris Fotinos '54, born March 11, 1933, died peacefully at home in Sonoma on August 6, 2014 surrounded by his loving wife and daughters. A native of San Francisco, George was born to the late Christos and Angelina Fotinos. He graduated from Santa Clara University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering. He then served in the US Army Corp of Engineers administering the construction of radar bases in Iceland and Canada after which George continued his education earning a Masters degree in Civil Engineering from U. C. Berkeley.

George worked for many years at Ben C. Gerwick Company in San Francisco on several major bridges including the Richmond-San Rafael Bridge, the San-Mateo Hayward Bridge, the Benicia-Martinez Bridge and waterfront structures throughout the San Francisco Bay. Other structures include the Northumberland Crossing in Eastern Canada, Jamuna Bridge in Bangladesh, Bahrain Crossing in the Persian Gulf and the Seven Mile Bridge in Florida. In latter years, George worked as a consultant and was serving on the Caltrans State Seismic Advisory Board until the onset of his illness.

He is survived by his beloved wife Vivian and his three beloved daughters and their cherished husbands, Angela and Ted Koros, Margaret and Mike Morearty and Elaine and Jim Burrell. He adored and was adored by his eight grandchildren, Elaina, Peter and Ava Koros, Paulina and Maria Morearty and John, George and James Burrell. He is survived by his sisters Christine Kolaites and Mary Anagnostou and predeceased by his brother Tom Fotinos and sister Katherine Fotinos. A devoted Greek Orthodox Christian, George enjoyed a life filled with the love of family and was most often found happily working on his Napa Carneros vineyard where he grew premium pinot noir grapes for nearly 50 years.

submitted Sep. 9, 2014 2:57P
UGRD Leavey Business '54
Charles A. Quinn Jr.

Charles Alexander Quinn Jr. '54 May 28, 1933 - May 24, 2014 A resident of San Jose, Charlie Quinn entered into rest on Saturday, May 25, three days shy of his 81st birthday.

Charlie was born at the old San Jose Sanatorium in downtown San Jose to Charles and Helen Quinn. Charlie's early years were spent at the family ranch in Los Gatos where they grew fruit trees and eventually strawberries. He attended and graduated from Bellarmine College Preparatory and Santa Clara University and remained close to his many great friends from those years.

Charlie Quinn was a self-starter. His mother Helen often recounted that his favorite phrase as a 2 year old was "feed self peaches". From that point on he charted his own course from starting school a year early because he wanted to be with his best pal Ed Nino to starting his own concrete product manufacturing firm, Mission Concrete Products, before he even had a single customer. In between, Charlie was a loving Husband, Father and fiercely loyal friend. In particular, Charlie enjoyed a 50 year love affair with his wife Dawn.

Charlie was a member of the San Jose Country Club for over 56 years and he belonged to Desert Island in Rancho Mirage, Calif. for over 26 years, which allowed him to enjoy the other love of his life, golf. Charlie enjoyed many friendships through the game and played some of the greatest golf courses in the world with his pals from the Gang of Eight.

Charlie Quinn is survived by his loving wife, Dawn, their faithful dog Bogey, his brother Tim (Trudy) Quinn of Loomis, Calif. and six children: Charles Quinn of Mendocino, Calif., Dr. Mark (Debbie) Quinn of Bozeman, Mont., Dr. Eryn (Julie) Quinn of East Grand Rapids, Mich., Patrick (Susan) Quinn of San Jose, Calif., Steve (Suzanne) Wardwell of Auburn, Calif., and Terry Wardwell of Santa Cruz, Calif. Charlie and Dawn are also proud Grandparents of 11 wonderful grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren.

submitted Jun. 6, 2014 4:01P

1956

'56
Jack Singer

Jack Valentine Singer Jr. ’56, a longtime Marin County resident, passed away peacefully following a long illness on March 20, 2014 on Maui, Hawaii with his wife of 42 years, Anna-Liisa Singer by his side. Jack was 79. Jack was born in Ross to parents Jack Valentine Singer and Gretchen Singer, both of whom practiced public accounting and maintained an office for many years in San Francisco. Jack graduated from Sir Francis Drake High School and attended the University of Santa Clara where he majored in accounting. Jack followed the footsteps of his parents and entered the accounting profession, maintaining an office in San Rafael and later in Petaluma. Jack loved life and he lived it fully. His interests were broad and included dancing, photography, golf, gardening, wine and carpentry. But none was greater than his desire to travel the world with his loving wife and with his children and grandchildren. Jack's grandchildren have a lifetime of memories, practical jokes and witty "grandpa-isms". Jack's sense of humor was a hallmark. Jack had many loyal clients whom Jack served with devotion. Those who knew Jack found him to be a bright light, an adventurer, fun, engaging and witty. Always looking for new beginnings, Jack and Anna-Liisa built or renovated numerous homes and ultimately moved to Meeteetse, Wyo. where they built a home on the Greybull river, from which Jack continued his accounting practice with his son Jack V. Singer, III ’77. Jack is survived by his daughter Doreen (Robert), son Jack V. Singer, III (Andrea), daughter Christine and six grandchildren.

submitted May. 22, 2014 11:40A
'56
Donald C. Bacon

Donald Charles Bacon ’56, Oct. 16, 2013. Donald Charles Bacon was born in San Mateo, Calif. in 1934 to John and Helen Bacon. He was 79 year old when he died, from a long-term illness, at his home in Tillamook. He graduated from Bellarmine College Prep in San Jose, Calif. in 1952 and from Santa Clara University in 1956 with a B.S. in commerce. During the college summer breaks Don worked in lumber retail, meatpacking and construction. He was in ROTC Army during college and served active duty in Germany from 1957 to 1959. In 1960 he was promoted to 1st Lt. He served two years of reserve duty. In 1961 he was honorably discharged and married Bliss C. Vissiere of San Mateo, Calif. During the 21 years of living in the San Francisco area Don was in a business partnership for which he organized and worked in a nursery and garden supply retail complex in Millbrae, Calif. and started a contractor's equipment rental company. He was an officer and partner in the Western Garden and Trade Show, which became the San Francisco Outdoor Garden Exposition in 1967. He was member of numerous professional associations, serving on boards, or finance committees. When their three children were in elementary and middle school, Don wanted to be home on most weekends to spend time with his children, so he sold his share of the partnership and started a new career working for a large construction company as a business developer, who brought together the interested parties of proposed projects through negotiated contracts. His company operated in California and Hawaii and constructed warehouses, shopping centers, apartments, business complexes, mobile home parks, and hospitals. He later joined another company for which he planned land use, financing and managed leasing the developed projects. Then he bought and developed his own condominiums. When Don sold the condominiums in 1977, he and his family moved to Sun River. Don bought, and managed Breslers 33 Flavors of Bend, and Tree House Pizza Parlor in Sun River, and by 1987 sold both business. He enjoyed outdoor activities of snow skiing, camping, canoeing, bicycling with his sons, and supporting his daughter in her love of horseback riding and related competitions. In 1983, Don became the executive director of Central Oregon Economic Development Council. Two years later, he became the Director of Tillamook Action Team, charged with developing economic opportunities in Tillamook County. He was able to obtain grant monies for the following businesses: Tillamook Country Smoker, Roger's Evergreens, Hebo Sewer and Water, Tillamook County Fairgrounds, and Port of Tillamook Bay. In 1987, he became the Regional Manager of the Southwest Region for the Oregon Economic Development Department. Two years later, he and Bliss moved to Tillamook, when he accepted the manager's position with the Port of Garibaldi. After 37 years of marriage, Bliss died of cancer in 1998. Don came to the job with new ideas, a set of skills and much work experience. He improved the port with the support of his commissioners and staff. The 2009 Outstanding Special District Service Award for Manager was given to Don. He was nominated by his commissioners and staff. Don retired in that year. In 2010, Jack Graves, a former commissioner, dedicated his history book 'The First 100 Years' of the Port of Garibaldi, 1910-2010 to Don. Don was well liked and respected by so many people in the community. In 2001 he met Dione Vice from Lafayette, La. at a wedding in Portland. They were married a year and half later and Dione moved to Tillamook. They enjoyed traveling up and down the coast, exploring the cities of the ports, and playing golf at the different courses. They took trips to visit his family in Portland, California and New Jersey, and her family in Illinois and Connecticut. They did volunteer work, serving the public meal at St. Alban's church once a month. Don stayed active until his illness caused him to slow down in his last month alive. He will be greatly missed because he was so loved. Don's surviving family include is wife, Dione Vice Bacon; two sons of Tigard, Donald C. Bacon, Jr. and daughter-in-law, Alison, Andrew V. Bacon and Daughter, Jennifer A. Bacon of Beaverton; step children Amanda Vice Rowley and son-in-law Marc of Connecticut, Edwin A. Vice, Jr., and daughter-in-law, Mary, of Illinois; two grandchildren, Jackson Rowley, and Vivian Rowley; brother John Bacon and sister-in-law, Lynn Bacon of Atherton, Calif. There are seven adult children in John Bacon's family. Don has many second generation, and a few third generation nephews and nieces, whom he loved and enjoyed so much.

submitted Dec. 3, 2013 10:09P
GRD Law '56
Arnold Berwick

Arnold Berwick J.D. '56 was born on Aug. 18, 1920 and passed away on Dec. 27, 2013 peacefully at home at the age of 93. Born in Belle Plaine, Iowa, he moved to San Francisco at the age of four with his parents, Andrew and Sophie Berwick, and sister Mildred (Bauer). He graduated from Lowell High School and U.C. Berkeley. At the age of 15 he met the love of his life, Dorothy Howse, to whom he was forever devoted. Arnold and Dorothy married in 1941 and later moved to Saratoga where they raised their three children, Laurie, Bruce and Duane. Arnold began his career following in the footsteps of his father as a carpenter, then went on to earn a law degree at Santa Clara University. He practiced law in San Jose for 25 years. He was a proud member of the Norwegian Club and Sons of Norway. He is survived by his daughter Duane, granddaughters Catherine, Claire, Anna and Gwen, and 11 great grandchildren. Arnold loved his life and had an extraordinary talent for relating his favorite memories and adventures into wonderful stories that everyone loved to hear, and that he loved to tell. 

submitted Apr. 7, 2014 4:56P

1957

GRD Law '57
Marshall W. Frazier

Marshall W. Frazier J.D. ’57 was born in Fraziers Bottom, W.Va. in 1921. During and after WWII he served in the U.S. Navy for eight years. After earning a law degree, he established and maintained a private practice in San Jose for 33 years.  He enjoyed fishing and traveling. Survivors include his wife of 71 years, Faye, his son Thomas, grandchildren, and great grandchildren.

submitted Aug. 19, 2014 10:42A
'57
Bill Horne

Billie "Bill" Horne '57, a friend to all who knew him, died May 27, at age 79 in Twain Harte, California. Bill was born in Mountain View, Oklahoma, and was active in ROTC at Santa Clara University. He served in the U.S. Army as a pilot for 4 years, earning the rank of Lieutenant. Professionally, Bill was active in real estate, including residential and commercial sales and property management. He served on the California Association of Realtors Board of Directors, as president of the Sacramento Association of Realtors, and the National Association of Property Managers, Sacramento Chapter and was active in the Tuolumne County Association of Realtors. He operated his own property management business until his passing. He wrote and taught property management courses and was always an enthusiastic cheerleader for others, providing encouragement, advice and assistance. He will be remembered for his intelligence, professionalism and warm smile. Bill is survived by Jhonnie Horne, his wife of 32 years; sister, Noma Horne; sons, Steven Horne and Chuck Horne; daughter, Janice Horne; stepsons, Duke Darling and Marc Crum; and preceded in death by stepson, Scott Darling. He has 12 grandchildren and 1 greatgrandchild. 

submitted Sep. 9, 2014 4:06P

1958

UGRD Arts & Sciences '58
Vincent T. Burns Jr.

Vincent T. Burns Jr. '58 of Santa Paula and Carpinteria, Calif., passed away from heart failure on June 11, 2014 at his ranch in Santa Paula after a brief illness. Vince was the first child of an Irish family, born September 19, 1936 in Utica, N.Y., to Vincent T. Sr. and Helen (nee Farmer) Burns. Vincent grew up in Pasadena and Coronado, Calif., where his father was assistant manager at the Huntington and del Coronado hotels.

Vince was a member of the class of 1954 at Loyola High School in Los Angeles and of the class of 1958 at Santa Clara University. With his wife of 56 years, Debby, Vince devoted his energies and passions to the Santa Paula Boys Club beginning in 1974. Under Vince, the club was one of the first in the nation to accept girls as members, becoming the Santa Paula Boys and Girls Club. The club enjoyed increased membership and programs under Vince, and was nationally recognized for its after-school programs and role in improving life in Santa Paula. To further the club and his community, Vince was active in Santa Paula's service organizations, including Kiwanis.

Beginning in 1984 Vince devoted himself to the family's orange ranch on South Mountain Road, irrigating, pruning, spraying, and making sure the fruit was picked on time. Since 1996 Vince and Debby have split their time between Santa Paula and their home on Rincon Point Road in Carpinteria. Exacting and imbued with a strong spirit of competition, Vince was always proud of his family's achievements.

He is survived by his wife Debby of Santa Paula and Carpinteria; brother Anthony Burns of Arcadia, Calif.; sister Darcy Williams '70 of Sacramento, Calif.; son Vincent T. Burns III (wife Ann) of Ventura, Calif.; daughter Laura Burns Brown of San Diego, Calif.; and grandchildren Nicholas John Burns, Ventura; Amy Nicole Brown, San Diego; Eric Brown, San Diego; and Emily Laura Burns, Ventura. A family remembrance of Vince's life will take place at a later date. Donations in Vince's name to the Santa Paula Boys and Girls Club or Alcoholics Anonymous of Santa Barbara are appreciated.

submitted Jun. 12, 2014 4:30P
'58
John J. Collins

John Joseph Collins '58, 77, passed away on Dec. 26, 2013. He was born Dec. 13, 1936 in Los Angeles, Calif. John was a pillar of the legal community in Southern California from the time he passed the bar until his death. He was a former president of the Los Angeles Chapter of the American Board of Trial Advocates, a former president of the Association of Southern California Defense Counsel, a former president of the Los Angeles County Bar, a member of the American College of Trial Lawyers, and a member of the International Academy of Trial Lawyers. He was a proud father, grandfather and a loving husband. John is survived by his wife, Patricia; daughters, Cynthia, Pamela and Lauren; sons, James, Robert, John and William. His daughter, Andrea predeceased him.

submitted Feb. 3, 2014 8:41A
UGRD Arts & Sciences '58
James Leininger

James Leininger '58 was a skillful Santa Clara County defense attorney, a crusader for social justice and a member of a family with deep roots in San Jose. But as a recovering alcoholic, he was known just as well for helping others emerge from the shoals of substance abuse -- be they lawyers, nurses, cops or Hells Angels.

Leininger, 78, of Gilroy, died March 19, 2014 of leukemia at Stanford Medical Center, where he had been undergoing an experimental treatment for his illness.
 
"He loved what he did, and what he did was to help people. And that's what made all the difference,'' said Jim Gleason, the executive director of the Santa Clara County Independent Defense Counsel Office.
 
As a lawyer, Leininger enjoyed taking the toughest cases, ones other lawyers shunned. In the 2010 trial of the men accused in the killing of Los Gatos restaurateur Mark Achilli, Leininger represented middleman Miguel Chaidez, who was accused of paying the triggerman.
 
"He was confident, but he wasn't arrogant,'' said his son, Michael Leininger. "He would dissect a jury and find the most appealing way to get to them.''
Leininger was a member of "The Other Bar,'' a confidential lawyers' recovery group. And he helped found the organization now known as We Care, which has helped more than 3,000 nurses with substance abuse problems.
 
For much of his 45-year career as an attorney, Leininger had to balance work with the demands of caring for his wife, Helen, who suffered from chronic illness. The two had met at the Sears store on San Carlos Street in San Jose, where both worked as clerks. Helen Leininger died in 2009.
 
Leininger was born at O'Connor Hospital in San Jose on January 23, 1936, the son of Carl Leininger, who became San Jose's city engineer, and Mary Leininger, a homemaker. The third of seven children, Leininger came from a family devoted to public service and social justice. A brother, William, was a Catholic priest. Another brother, Robert, became a ranking official in San Jose's redevelopment agency.
 
A 1958 graduate of Santa Clara University, Leininger worked in War on Poverty programs in the mid-'60s, graduated from Lincoln Law School and served as executive director of the Catholic Council on Social Justice.
In that job, he shamed the San Jose City Council into rejecting a bid from the Elks Club, which at the time discriminated against nonwhites, to sponsor a circus at the Civic Auditorium. Leininger pointed out to a wavering Councilman Norm Mineta, later a mayor and congressman, that he would not be able to join the Elks because of his Japanese descent.
 
Leininger is survived by his son, Michael, Gilroy; two daughters, Kelly Douglas, Los Gatos; and Trish Loughnane, Woodland Hills, and seven grandchildren.
submitted Mar. 24, 2014 12:22P
'58
Gordon Abbott

Gordon Abbott '58, July 12, 1930 - November 7, 2013. A resident of San Jose, Gordon Abbott passed away after a difficult and valiant battle with cancer. His family was paramount and he enjoyed participating in his children and grandchildren's activities. An ardent sports fan and active in the community, he was also well known for his political involvement. He served on the Campbell Union School District Board of Trustees from 1971 through 1982, the San Jose Council Salary Setting Commission from 1986-1994 and on the Governor's Advisory Board for the Agnew Development Center from 1998-2009. He also served on the Santa Clara County G.O.P Central Committee from 1958-1963 and 1994-2005, earning the nickname "Mr. Republican".
Gordon was born in Baltimore, Maryland and graduated from Issaquah High School, Issaquah, WA and earned a degree in Business from Santa Clara University. He was an accountant and served as a corporate finance officer for several small businesses over his career.

Gordon is survived by his loving wife, Mayme, devoted children Gordon Abbott of San Ramon, Philip Abbott of Dallas, TX and Wendy Abbott Sarsfield '83 of San Francisco, Daughters-in-law Holly Mueller Abbott of San Ramon and Tracy Driscoll Abbott of Dallas, TX and grandchildren Matthew and Nicholas Abbott of San Ramon, Sydney, Maggie and Jeffrey Abbott of Dallas, TX and Patrick and Megan Sarsfield of San Francisco.
 
submitted Nov. 15, 2013 3:17P
'58
Gerald L'Estrange

Gerald C. L’Estrange ’58 passed away on May 3, 2014. He was born January 28, 1935. He was so proud to have graduated from SCU and has been a true supporter over the years.

 
submitted Aug. 14, 2014 9:46P

1959

'59
Richard Callahan

Richard Callahan '59: May 21, 1937 to August 7, 2014. Richard passed away peacefully at his home in Orange, California. He was born in Pasadena and was an East Orange resident for 15 years. He graduated from Santa Clara University with a BSC in accounting and a minor in ethics. He served as a 1st Lt. in the U.S. Army Armor Corps. He was a comptroller for Sears, Roebuck & Co., a VP, comptroller for Coldwell Banker, and a registered investment advisor with Ameriprise. Recently he became the publisher of the Foothills Sentry newspaper. He authored four books on investing and the economy.

He is survived by his loving wife, Joanne; his children, Michael Callahan ’80, Brian, Maureen, Lydia and Lynn; and his grandchildren, Kyle, Ryan, Zach, Alex and Connor. He was passionate about being involved with community issues and watching all types of sports. His family and friends enjoyed his gourmet cooking. He deeply affected those who knew him with his loving, caring spirit. We miss him and look up to him, as we always have. 

submitted Sep. 15, 2014 11:47A
'59
Raymond Welch

Raymond L. Welch '59, 82, passed away on July 12, 2014. He entered the world on May 9, 1932, in San Francisco, California. His parents were Elinor Nemis and Roy Wade who gave him over to be raised by William R. Welch and Ann C Welch. He grew up in San Francisco attending St. Anne's Grammar School. At the age of 14, he moved with his parents to Salinas where he attended Salinas High. He played on the tennis team and graduated in 1950. He went to college at Santa Clara University, and was on the college tennis team. He majored in economics. He served in the Army, attending Fort Ord and a year later served in Wertheim, Germany. Upon his return he went to work for his father in the men's clothing business called" The Hub" in Salinas.

In 1957, he married Carolyn J Fodrini from Alameda, California. They had three children: Suzanne M., Patrick M. and Steven D. Carolyn was a legal secretary for a while in Salinas. In 1960, they left Salinas and moved to Marin County where Ray went to work for UARCO in San Francisco. They lived in Mill Valley, Fairfax and later moved to Alameda, and then bought a home in San Leandro, California, where they lived for several years. They left their home in San Leandro, to move to Napa, California, in 1970. Ray went to work for Valley Business Forms in Calistoga. He remained there until 1985 when he went into business for himself starting the Welch Co. After 44 years of marriage his wife, Carolyn, passed away in 2001.

Ray later married Virginia L. Gomes from Maryland in 2002 and they resided in the Napa Valley and were members at The Silverado Country Club. Ray and Ginny loved playing golf among many other interests. Ray was a member of the Morning Napa Rotary Club, and had belonged to Napa Valley Country Club and Green Valley Country Club. In 2007, they moved to Chewelah, Washington, to build their "dream" home on the Chewelah Golf & Country Club where they currently reside. Ray leaves behind his wife, Ginny; his three children: Suzanne (husband Stephen), Pat (wife Kelly) and Steven (wife Kate); and three grandchildren: Morgan and Austin (Pat) and Chloe (Steven).

During Ray's young life he was a Boy Scout, an Eagle Scout and an Explorer Scout. Later, he was a member of the Junior Chamber of Commerce in Salinas, Mill Valley and San Leandro. He also worked with young teens in the Junior Achievement Program. He was also a member of the Salinas Elks Club. He also managed a Little League baseball team in Napa. 

submitted Sep. 9, 2014 4:28P
'59
John Vasconcellos
see year 1954
'59
John F. Quirk III

John "Jack" F. Quirk III J.D. '59, 86, passed away in Bakersfield, Calif., on Feb. 19, 2014. Jack was born in Oakland, Calif., on June 22, 1927, to his parents Loretta Josephine Bowen Quirk and John Francis Quirk ll. Jack graduated from Salinas high school in 1945. He then attended San Mateo Junior College. While attending San Jose State College, Jack met his wife, Ann Virginia Page. They were married in 1952 and enjoyed 61 years of marriage together. Jack was drafted into the United States Army during the Korean War, served at Far East Command Headquarters and reported directly to NATO commanders Gen. John Hull and Gen. Maxwell D. Taylor. Upon discharge from the army, Jack resumed his education at Santa Clara University, earning his J.D. in 1959. He and his family moved to Porterville, Calif., in Oct. of 1959, where he went to work in the Tulare County District Attorneys office under his mentor and friend Hon. Jaye Ballentine. He then transferred to the Public Defenders office. In 1961, Jack went into private practice and also served as the city attorney for Porterville for 17 years. He was appointed to the bench by Gov. George Deukmejian in June of 1984. Jack was predeceased by his wife Ann in Sept. of 2013. He is survived by his brother, James Patrick Quirk, his son John Quirk and wife Donna, daughter Diane Varner and husband Bob, daughter Erin Buell and husband Gary, and daughter Kelley Rockfellow and Keith Fullerton. He is further survived by grandchildren Shannon Knop and husband Carl, Katie Quirk, Grant Rockfellow, Mason Rockfellow, Connor Buell, and one great granddaughter, Clayton Knop. 

 

submitted Apr. 22, 2014 9:45P
'59
Donald de la Pena

Donald Joseph de la Pena '59 passed away on August 20, 2014. He was a resident of San Jose, meticulous planner of cities and just about everything else, lover of nature and art, avid photographer, history buff, and mostly . . . loving, generous, and caring husband, father, and grandfather. These are the qualities that Donald de la Pena contributed to this life, qualities that many people only aspire to. Donald left us too early and too quickly. He leaves behind his wife of 28 years, Carmel Foglia de la Pena, and five children and step-children: Michael de la Pena, Kimberly Taggart, Chris Dunia, Stephen Foglia, and Barbara Duggan. Donald had eight grandchildren: Kai de la Pena, Joseph Taggart, Zachary Dunia, Cody Dunia, Joseph Duggan, Jillian Duggan-Herd, Michael Duggan and Jonathan Duggan.

Born in Oceanside Long Island, New York, on April 8, 1936, Donald moved to California in 1949 with his parents and sister. Donald received his Bachelor's Degree in Civil Engineering from Santa Clara University and then achieved a Master's Degree in Urban Planning from University of California at Berkeley. Donald worked as a City Planning Director for his entire career, most recently for the City of Menlo Park. After retirement, he managed Carmel's art business. He loved to go on trips with his wife, where he photographed nature, and Carmel would turn the beautiful things he captured in photos into paintings. 

submitted Sep. 15, 2014 11:59A
UGRD Leavey Business '59
Charles "Chas" W. Reed

Charles "Chas" William Reed ’59, resident of Los Gatos, loving husband, father, and grandfather, died peacefully on June 1, 2014, in Los Gatos at the age of 90.

Born on August 25, 1923, in Spokane, Wash., he was the son of Stephen and Elizabeth Reed, brother to Mary E. Hopkins Salisbury and John M. Reed, all deceased. Chas served in the Navy in the South Pacific in World War II and settled in San Francisco, Calif., after the war. He married Margaret "Peg" Toepel in 1947. In 1952 he relocated from San Francisco to the Santa Clara Valley and established a successful jewelry and watch repair business, Chas W. Reed Jewelers, in downtown Santa Clara.

After selling the business, Chas attended Santa Clara University, graduating in 1959 magna cum laude with a degree in business and accounting and established a CPA firm in Santa Clara specializing in consulting and tax services for general contractors. In 1970 he began a successful real estate career as a residential land developer, broker, and investor that lasted over 40 years. Chas is survived by his loving wife of 67 years and their four children: Lydia Franzese ’70 (Stephen), William Reed M.S. ’14, Veronica Miller (Michael) and Christopher Reed (Mary) and eight grandchildren. He will be missed by his loved ones and many friends.

submitted Aug. 15, 2014 9:36A
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