Sprinksing into action

Sprinksing into action
Photo by Charles Barry
by Jeff Gire |
Students come together to thank donors on the first annual “Sprinksgiving” event.
Thank you notes: Students sign a giant card thanking donors. Photo by Charles Barry

In Santa Clara University’s history, gifts from donors have founded schools, built libraries, and provided countless scholarships. This May, current students gathered on campus to celebrate this history of philanthropy during “Sprinksgiving.”

“The goal of Sprinksgiving is to make time for being thankful to our donors,” said Brenda Alba, a member of the Santa Clara Student Philanthropy Committee. “We want to show that we appreciate how generous they are.”

The day of the event, an enormous thank you card was placed in front of the Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato Technology Center, and Orradre Library, which quickly filled with student signatures and messages to donors. Students shrunk their handwriting and craned their necks to find an open space, which just goes to show, if you’re Broncos at SCU, there’s a lot to be thankful for.

A video made at the celebration captures a taste of students’ gratitude and appreciation.

Summer 2014

Table of contents

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