Santa Clara University

Mission Matters

Locatelli honored at "Spirit of Silicon Valley"

In October 2005, SCU President Paul Locatelli, S.J., received the Silicon Valley Leadership Group’s Spirit of Silicon Valley Lifetime Achievement Award. Locatelli was honored for building SCU into a nationally recognized university and for his commitment to ethics.

“When we think of ‘The Spirit of Silicon Valley,’ it is easy to imagine Fr. Locatelli,” said Carl Guardino, CEO of the Silicon Valley Leadership Group (SVLG). “He epitomizes the criteria considered for these words: impeccable ethics, business excellence, and community engagement.” Locatelli is the 10th recipient of the SVLG award.

Locatelli has been president of SCU since 1988, and his unprecedented fourth term lasts through 2010.  

Accepting the award, Locatelli said, “This award is less about me and much more about Santa Clara University and the Jesuits, the religious order of Catholic priests dedicated to education. Our idea of educating leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion matches SVLG’s ideals for this award.”

In addition to running the University, Locatelli serves on a number of regional and national boards including the National Conference of Community and Justice/Silicon Valley Region, the American Leadership Forum, Joint Venture: Silicon Valley Network, and the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities.

Fourth annual Ethical Outlook

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at SCU held its fourth annual “Ethical Outlook: A National Ethics Agenda” on Nov. 10, 2005. The center’s Emerging Issues Group, which meets weekly and includes faculty members, staff, scholars, and advisory board members, developed the list of six critical ethical issues that will shape personal and national character in the coming year.

The topics on this year’s national ethics agenda were immigration, energy, excessive executive compensation, the ethics of confirmation, student performance exams, and heroes in
our society.

To accompany the panel discussion, the Ethics Center staff published a printed report and created a DVD of the event to send to college professors of ethics and applied ethics throughout the nation.

The panelist included David Berger, chair of the mergers and acquisitions litigation practice at the Palo Alto law firm of Wilson, Sonsini, Goodrich & Rosati; David DeCosse, director of the campus ethics program; Steven Johnson, director of character education at the Markkula Center; Scott LaBarge, assistant professor of philosophy and classics at SCU; Judy Nadler, senior fellow in government ethics at the center and former chair, U.S. Conference of Mayors Standing Committee on Energy; and Terri Peretti, chair of the political science department at SCU.

For more information, visit the event Web site: www.scu.edu/ethics/publications/ethicsoutlook/2005.

Skateboarding 101



William Woods on skateboard
William Woods, who came to SCU from Loyola University New Orleans, tries out his new skateboard on Alviso Street, outside of Donohoe Alumni House. (Photo: Jennifer Jackson)
An extracurricular course for students from New Orleans attending SCU attracted national attention in October. The school’s “Skateboarding Etiquette 101” was featured in an Associated Press article on students coping with local traditions as they transferred from schools hit by Hurricane Katrina to other parts of the country.

Following Katrina, a total of 46 students from Loyola University New Orleans, Tulane University, and Xavier University enrolled at SCU, and tuition and fees were waived for the fall quarter. Those students were invited to attend the one-hour class, which featured tips on the basics of skateboarding, safety, and campus regulations. Students were given skateboards of their own, to join the dozens of undergraduates who skateboard across the campus.

The course was offered by Life After SCU, a program sponsored by the Alumni Association that also offers graduating seniors a series of “real-life” classes to help them make the transition to post-college life. Gravity Skateboards of Southern California gave a discounted rate on the skateboards after learning about the special course and the students who would be receiving the boards.

 

Phil Kesten is California Professor of the Year

Santa Clara University Professor Phil Kesten was honored with one of the top awards in college teaching when he was named the California Professor of the Year by the Council for Advancement and Support of Education and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Education. The award was presented in Washington, D.C., in November 2005.

Phil Kesten, right, with U.S. Congressman Mike Honda.
Phil Kesten, right, with U.S. Congressman Mike Honda. (Photo: Daniel Peck)


Kesten, chair of the Department of Physics and an associate professor, has taught at SCU since 1990. He is known for his innovative teaching techniques, as well as his devotion to his students. At SCU, he has been awarded the David Logothetti Teaching Award.

“He gets students excited about the material,” said his physics department colleague, Associate Professor Rich Barber.

“I’m always looking for ways to bring students into the enterprise,” Kesten said. “They can’t be passive.”

  Kesten engages students by narrating interesting stories about electromagnets, subatomic particles, astrophysics, and the origins of life. For a homework assignment, he might ask them to figure out how much it would cost to cover the state of Nebraska in gold.

“Students regularly ask him to join them outside of the classroom to help them understand complex issues in physics,” wrote University President Paul Locatelli, S.J., in a letter nominating Kesten for the award. “He spent a Saturday morning discussing the physics of falling with a group of students before they left on a skydiving trip. And he spent an evening talking about the physics of ice with another group before a midnight trip to a hockey rink to play broomball.”

Kesten has also been very involved with SCU’s Residential Learning Community program, including serving as director of the overall program and faculty director of one program.

The professor is also vice president of strategic directions of Burlingame-based Docutek, a division of SirsiDynix. Docutek, which provides e-learning collaboration for students and libraries, grew out of a project Kesten started at SCU in the 1990s.

The CASE and Carnegie awards are considered the Oscars of college teaching. A professor is chosen in each state, along with four U.S. professors of the year. SCU Professor Francisco Jim´enez was named one of the U.S. Professors of the Year in 2002.

First national "Out There" conference


In October 2005, Santa Clara University hosted the first national conference for professionals who address lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer issues on Catholic campuses.

Nearly 150 people from 40 universities registered for the “Out There” Conference. Among the universities represented were Georgetown, Loyola Marymount, Gonzaga, Fordham, DePaul, Boston College, College of the Holy Cross, La Salle, and Marquette. Most of those attending were faculty and administrators who work with gay students or subject
matter related to the gay population.

Presenters to the conference were asked to address the question, “Is the institutional mix like oil and water, and do we have more in common with other universities than the general public might guess?” Three of the presenters were Jesuit priests.

Sessions at the conference included “Curriculum and Same-Sex Marriage in a Jesuit University,” “Providing Optimal Health Care for LGBTQ students,” and “Can I Be Gay and Catholic? Encouraging Theological Engagement and Reflection on LGBTQ Issues.”

“I am delighted to see the well-established and influential discipline of LGBTQ Studies discussed by my colleagues from a diverse array of Catholic campuses,” said Linda Garber, co-organizer of the event and the director of SCU’s Women’s and Gender Studies Program.

Lisa Millora, SCU’s assistant dean of student life, and a conference co-organizer, said, “This conference is important in moving the student affairs profession forward in its understanding of the unique experiences and vulnerabilities that gay, lesbian, and transgender students go through.” 

SCU elects four new trustees

Four new trustees have been elected to SCU’s Board of Trustees. The four trustees include three alumni and one member who is the parent of a current SCU student. “The addition of these four trustees strengthens an already outstanding Board of Trustees,” said SCU President Paul Locatelli, S.J.

Gregory Bonfiglio, S.J. '82 Gregory Bonfiglio, S.J. ’82, president of Jesuit High School of Sacramento. He earned his bachelor’s of science degree from Santa Clara and his master’s degree in divinity from the Jesuit School of Theology in Berkeley. He was ordained in 1994.
David C. Drummond '85 David C. Drummond ’85, senior vice president of corporate development for Google in Mountain View. A bachelor of arts graduate of SCU, he is also a graduate of the Stanford University School of Law. Before joining Google, Drummond was executive vice president and chief financial officer for SmartForce, where he helped transform the publicly traded company into the world’s largest e-learning company.
J. Terrence J. Terrence “Terry” Lanni, chief executive officer and chairman of the board of MGM Mirage in Las Vegas, one of the world’s leading hotel and gaming companies. Prior to serving on SCU’s Board of Trustees, Lanni was chairman of the Board of Trustees at Loyola High School in Los Angeles. His son is an undergraduate at SCU.
Robert Peters '61 Robert Peters ’61, a private investor in Los Altos. He served as the original marketing vice president at Cisco Systems and has been the director of several start-up companies, including Heritage Bank of Commerce of San Jose. Peters earned his bachelor of science degree in electrical engineering at SCU and his MBA from Harvard. While serving on the University’s Board of Regents, Peters and his wife made a $1.5 million gift to Santa Clara’s School of Engineering. The gift endowed the Robert W. Peters Professorship, which is for a faculty member in the area of advanced technology. “Santa Clara is truly a university that strives to educate the whole student including ethics, morality, and community involvement. I am happy to do whatever I can to ensure that the University is successful in that role,” Peters said. (See Page 24 for an interview with Peters.)

Photography, lynching, and moral change

Senior Michelle Dezember (left) and Emily Lewis '05 (right) help Assistant Professor Briget Cooks research the history of exhibitions of African-American art and culture.
Senior Michelle Dezember (left) and Emily Lewis '05 (right) help Assistant Professor Briget Cooks research the history of exhibitions of African-American art and culture.
The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics has been inviting the campus community to explore ethical issues at “Ethics at Noon” events for many years. Last January, Assistant Professor of Art History and Ethnic Studies Bridget Cooks gave a talk on “What Do We See When We Look: Photography, Lynching, and Moral Change.”

Cooks’ “Ethics at Noon” presentation and scholarly research discusses the existence and exhibition of photos depicting the lynching of African-  Americans. She addressed some interesting questions, including:

  Who takes such horrifying pictures and why?

  Why would a museum or gallery want to display such disturbing images?

  Why would any of us want to view such pictures?

  Can the experience of seeing such pictures be redemptive?

To learn more about “Photography, Lynching, and Moral Change,” visit the online version of the magazine at www.scu.edu/lynching.


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