Santa Clara University

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Mission Matters


These programs mean business

BusinessWeek logoBusinessWeek magazine has named Santa Clara University’s undergraduate business program among the top in the nation. This is the first time the business program, which came in at No. 27, has made the rankings. Also this spring, U.S. News & World Report ranked SCU’s part-time MBA program No. 14 in the nation.

The BusinessWeek assessment, gathered from surveys conducted with recruiting firms and students, evaluated nearly 100 business programs nationally. Among the measurements taken were entering student test scores, teaching quality, and alumni job placement.

“I am delighted that our undergraduate business program has been recognized for its academic rigor, the excellent instruction by our teacher-scholars, and the success of our alumni,” said Barry Z. Posner, dean of the Leavey School of Business at SCU.

The program earned an A+ in job placement, was ranked No. 20 by recruiting firms in the quality of graduates, and scored No. 18 in academic quality among all 93 ranked programs.

The Santa Clara University undergraduate business program was third among California schools listed. Among Jesuit business schools, Santa Clara University shared the limelight with Georgetown and Boston College.

The graduate student body was ranked among the top 50 most diverse (21.6 percent minorities) by U.S. News. Graduates of the part-time MBA progam have some of the highest salaries in the nation—averaging $100,466 in base salary, making the program sixth in the nation among highest paid new graduates. KCS


Re-imagining Jesuit education: the State of SCU

How can we reimagine the meaning of Jesuit education? That was the task President Paul Locatelli, S.J., set as part of the annual State of the University address on Feb. 13. Drawing on his 19 years of experience as president, he discussed the meaning of community and encouraged students, faculty, and staff to pursue learning and living our values every day.

The University is preparing its academic programs for the 21st century, he noted, undergoing changes to the Core Curriculum and a self-study in preparation for reaccreditation by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC).

With funds raised by the recently concluded Campaign for Santa Clara, he noted, the University was able to establish 12 new endowed professorships—including one now held by Jim Koch, acting dean of the School of Engineering.

The audience gave several rounds of applause to retiring men’s basketball Head Coach Dick Davey—along with a standing ovation, not least because Santa Clara had defeated Gonzaga the night before to take first place in the WCC. (Read “A Century of Bronco Basketball” for more. )

One of Santa Clara’s goals as an institution is to be a community of inclusive excellence, Locatelli said. A recent off-campus theme party held by students from which offensive images were published online, compelled the president to address reinforcing our commitment to diversity and cultural sensitivity.

Other challenges facing the University, and students in particular, are the dangers presented by alcohol abuse and ever-more anonymous and widespread Internet communication. Locatelli urged members of the community to be cautious and responsible in their use of both.

The president also briefly discussed his appointment to the position of Secretary for Higher Education for the Society of Jesus. Although he said he was initially reluctant to take a position centered in Rome, he is looking forward to contributing to the improvement of Jesuit education around the world: There will be a new Jesuit university opening in Africa later this year, as well as an online institution.

Senior Jenny Moody, president of the student body, also addressed the state of the University from the student perspective. She cited increased student safety, additional study space, and confronting the pervasive alcohol culture as the ASSCU’s top priorities this year. SS

Read the full text of Fr. Locatelli’s address.


Leadership, learning, and empathy abroad

Leslie Gray, associate professor of environmental studies
Land of cotton: Leslie Gray in Burkina Faso. Photo: David Pace
Catherine Kilbane '05
Hiking the Inca Trail: A Fulbright has taken Catherine Kilbane ’05 to Peru. Photo: Courtesy of Catherine Kilbane

This spring two SCU faculty traded their SCU classrooms for international learning venues—one in Africa, the other in Central Europe. The occasion: They’re recipients of prestigious Fulbright grants. So is a recent SCU grad, Catherine Kilbane ’05, who spent the past academic year on a research Fulbright in Peru.

In January, Leslie Gray, associate professor of environmental studies, trekked to Burkina Faso to study the effects that U.S. cotton subsidies have on poor farmers in West Africa. In February, Elizabeth Enayati Powers ’80, J.D. ’89, assistant dean for international and comparative law and executive director of the Center for Global Law and Policy, traveled to Poland to teach a course at the law school at the University of Warsaw.

Gray is no stranger to Africa or to Fulbright grants. She and her husband, Michael Kevane, associate professor in economics and chair of the Core Curriculum committee, run Friends of African Village Libraries, a nonprofit organization that has seven small village libraries in Burkina Faso and Ghana. Gray is also co-editor of Hanging by a Thread: Globalization, Cotton, and Poverty in Africa, recently accepted for publication by Ohio University Press. This is her third Fulbright award. Previously she explored land degradation and deforestation issues in Burkina Faso and coping strategies for drought in Sudan.

On her Fulbright teaching fellowship, Powers will offer Polish law students a glimpse of American teaching styles and present U.S. intellectual property laws against a backdrop of European legislation. Powers has been teaching the Protection of Intellectual Property class at SCU since 1996, when she co-authored IP Strategy: Complete Intellectual Property Planning, Access and Protection with Howard Anawalt.

It was at Gray’s prodding, and with the assistance of political science Professor Jane L. Curry, that Kilbane applied for the Fulbright grant that has taken her to Peru.

Kilbane has been monitoring debt-for-nature transactions in Peru. And she has been living out a dream she’s had for more than a decade of working in conservation in Latin America. At Santa Clara she participated in the University Honors Program and double majored in environmental studies and Spanish studies. Even so, she notes, “I never even would have considered applying for a Fulbright had Dr. Gray not first brought it up and then pushed me to go for it.” KCS


Sustainability is her middle name

She graduated from SCU in 2005 with a degree in biology, and just over a year ago Lindsey Cromwell was back to play a new role: that of the first Sustainability Coordinator on campus. Since February 2006, the Hawaii native has put time into a campus-wide sustainability audit, both looking for where the low-hanging fruit could be found, and to get a sense of where the long-term challenges lie; and she’s focused on education and outreach to the campus community. Among her projects: launching the monthly e-newsletter “Sustainability at SCU”; coordinating the first Campus Sustainability Day, held last October; and, recently, heading up SCU participation in the national RecycleMania competition.

Read an extended Q&A with Lindsey Cromwell.


1,000 points of light

The first day of spring is always cause for celebration. Especially when we’re talking green—power that is, along with energy and money saved. Which is what brought to campus city of Santa Clara Mayor Patricia M. Mahan J.D. ’80, Silicon Valley Leadership Group Energy Programs Director Justin Bradley, and California Assemblyman Lloyd Levine (D-Van Nuys). They joined reps from Silicon Valley Power (SVP) and SCU on March 21 to celebrate how the University has become a community benchmark for sustainable energy, and to discuss Levine’s proposed legislation to ban the sale of incandescent light bulbs in California by 2012.

SCU students have received more than 1,000 compact fluorescent bulbs from SVP, leading to savings of more than 60,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) of electricity annually. And the University’s participation in SVP’s 100 percent renewable wind and solar program—over 1,600 megawatt-hours annually—is one of the largest renewable energy purchases by a university in California.

compact fluorescent lightbulb

The University has also taken advantage of lighting, heat, and air conditioning energy efficiency programs that have saved nearly 1 million kWh of electricity and kept a million pounds of carbon dioxide from being pumped into the atmosphere. And they’ve brought SCU more than $200,000 in rebates.

Assistant Vice President University Operations Joe Sugg points to other key achievements when it comes to sustainability:

  • SCU is now recycling about 50 percent of waste produced on campus.
  • More than half the water consumed on campus is reclaimed water.
  • The new building for the Leavey School of Business will be 10 percent better than the efficiency standards introduced in California last year.

But when it comes to making a real difference in the world, Sugg says, the most important part isn’t what happens now. “We are also attempting to give students a culture of sustainability so that they will run a sustainable life or business for the next 60 years.” SBS

Read an extended Q&A about sustainability on campus with Joe Sugg and find out how you can help.


Truth will out—thanks to an SCU law student

Santa Clara law student Curtis Macon has helped free an innocent man from prison. Through his work as an intern with University’s Northern California Innocence Project (NCIP), Macon assisted a public defender with assembling evidence that proved that 29-year-old Jeffrey Rodriguez could not have committed the crime of which he was convicted in 2001.

On Feb. 5, Rodriguez, whose home is in Santa Clara County, was freed after he served nearly six years in prison following a robbery conviction. The evidence against him consisted of the victim’s eyewitness testimony of the robbery and a spot on Rodriguez’s jeans that a Santa Clara criminalist testified was motor oil. The prosecution argued that the oil was transferred onto the jeans during the crime, which took place behind an auto parts store.

Rodriguez was arrested the morning after the robbery when the robbery victim, standing in line at the DMV, noticed Rodriguez standing in another line; she told the police that Rodriguez was the man who robbed her.

SCU law student Curtis Macon with exonerated Jeffrey Rodriguez
Coming home: SCU law student Curtis Macon, right, with Jeffrey Rodriguez and family. Photo: David Gonzales

In Rodriguez’s first trial, his attorney called an expert witness to dispute the criminalist's findings and called several alibi witnesses in Rodriguez’s defense. That trial ended in a hung jury, voting 11-1 for acquittal. At the second trial, the same defense attorney failed to call the expert because he said there was no money left to hire one. Nor did he call the alibi witnesses. Rodriguez was convicted and, under the “three strikes” rules in California, he was sentenced to 25 years to life.

Appellate attorney Irma Castillo successfully won a new trial for Rodriguez after convincing the 6th District Court of Appeals that his trial counsel had been ineffective. Public defender Andy Gutierrez was appointed to represent him and contacted NCIP for help.

Macon, a student intern at NCIP, worked with Gutierrez on investigation and research, including diagramming discrepancies in the victim’s identification testimony and re-enacting the crime. They had the jeans retested, which showed that there was no oil on the pants; and they used video forensic experts to prove Rodriguez’s jacket was not the one in the surveillance video. Based on this new exculpatory evidence, the district attorney decided to drop charges against Rodriguez, and in February he was released from prison. KCS


Three for the board

The University welcomed three new members to its Board of Trustees this winter, two of whom are alumni of the University.

William CarterWilliam S. Carter B.S. ’71, M.S. ’95—former vice president, chief technology officer, Xilinx, Los Gatos
A 30-year veteran of the semiconductor industry, Carter spent the first 10 years in microprocessors and peripherals and the last 20 in programmable logic. He led the development of the first Field Programmable Gate Array, now a $2.5 billion industry.
 


 


P. Anthony RidderP. Anthony “Tony” Ridder—former chairman and CEO of Knight Ridder, Woodside
Ridder served as chairman and CEO of Knight Ridder from 1995 until its sale to McClatchy in 2006. President of Knight Ridder since 1989, he joined its corporate staff as president of the newspaper division in 1986. He joined the San Jose Mercury News in 1964 and was appointed publisher in 1977.
 


 


Tasce Simon '03Tasce Simon ’03—medical student, San Francisco
Tasce Simon graduated from SCU summa cum laude with a bachelor’s degree in accounting. She is currently in her second year of medical school at UCSF, where she is chapter co-president of the American Medical Student Association and chairwoman of the Native American Health Alliance. KCS


 


 


Dorm Storm

dormstorm_LG

RecycleManiacs from left: junior Scott Dow, Bucky Bronco, and sophomore J. T. Harechmak. Photo: Charles Barry

Where were you on the night of March 14? This green-shirted crew was storming the halls of the Graham Residence Center in pursuit of bottles, cans, and other recyclables. It’s part of RecycleMania—a 10-week competition involving 200 universities across the U.S. to see which school can recycle the most. SBS


A new place for parents

More and more folks seeking information about universities are turning to the Web—and now parents of current and prospective SCU students have a site that’s been built just for them.

While Santa Clara’s primary relationship is with students, parents and family play an important role in a student’s college selection and experience. From the new parents site, parents can easily pay bills, check the campus vacation calendar, and get in touch with student life organizations. See the new parents site.

The online campus map has also been given a makeover recently. The interactive map both makes it easier to find what you’re looking for on campus and includes photos. Visit the campus map.  SS & KL
Web Exclusives: Q&A

What is Santa Clara doing on campus to promote sustainability? What's in the works? And what can we do to help?

Read more from Sustainability Coordinator Lindsey Cromwell.

Read more from Assistant Vice President for University Operations Joe Sugg.

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