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Santa Clara Mag Blog

Santa Clara Magazine's blog, updated whenever the writing goblin visits the editorial staff of the magazine.

The following postings have been filtered by tag On Campus. clear filter
  •  On Campus: Poetry triple-header Nov. 2

    Thursday, Oct. 27, 2011

    The Gerard Manley Hopkins, S.J., Reading Series serves up a winsome threesome for the fall poetry reading: Santa Clara's own Kirk Glaser, Claudia Monpere McIsaac, and Chancellor William Rewak, S.J.

     

    WHERE: Fess Parker Studio Theatre

    WHEN: Wed., Nov. 2 — 4 p.m.

    WHO: Well, there's...

     

    Kirk Glaser. He's taught writing and literature at Santa Clara for over 15 years and serves as faculty advisor to The Santa Clara Review. His work has been nominated twice for the Pushcart Prize, and he has received an American Academy of Poets prize, C. H. Jones National Poetry Prize, and University of California Poet Laureate Award. His poetry can be found in The Threepenny Review, Cerise Press, Alsop Review, Berkeley Poetry Review, as well as the The Cortland Review.

     

     

    Claudia Monpere McIsaac. She's taught at Santa Clara for 25 years, and her poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction have appeared in The Kenyon Review, Prairia Schooner, Ecotone, Puerto del Sol, and elsewhere.

     

    William Rewak, S.J. Known as Santa Clara's poet-president, Fr. Rewak led the University 1976–88 and returned to Santa Clara as Chancellor this summer, after having served as President of Spring Hill College, director of the Jesuit Retreat House in Los Altos, and professor of poetry at Loyola Marymount University. Read more about Fr. Rewak in the Fall issue of the Santa Clara Magazine. And read his poems Abundance and Modern Warfare in America magazine.

     

    Also know: We here at the mag like good writing. And it just so happens that Fr. Rewak founded Santa Clara Magazine 30 years ago, in autumn 1981.

     

    Share the news: A PDF flyer about the poetry reading is available here for downloading, printing out, pasting up, handing forth.

     

    Who's responsible? The reading is sponsored by the SCU Department of English and the Creative Writing Program.

    —Jon Teel

     

     

  •  On campus: National security and ... motorcycles in Kenna Hall?

    Monday, Oct. 11, 2010
    It was a full house at the Mayer Theatre on Friday evening when Leon Panetta ’60, J.D ’63, director of the Central Intelligence Agency, kicked off the fifth annual President’s Speaker Series as part of the Grand Reunion celebrations on the Mission campus.
     
    “It's hard to believe that I am celebrating my 50th graduation anniversary,” said the CIA chief. “I made some special friends at Santa Clara and we did some crazy things.” Those included motorcycles on the first floor of Kenna Hall and “infamous” dances in San Francisco. (How infamous? He wondered if his classmates were still barred from the Palace Hotel.) “It was a special time.”
     
    In his reminiscences, Panetta also fondly remembered a very special friend in Paul Locatelli, S.J., ’60, former University president and chancellor who passed away in July.
     
    “He made Santa Clara what it is today,” said Panetta of his classmate. “He truly embodied the Jesuit ideals of academic excellence and public service. We have lost a friend but gained a saint.”
     
    As he addressed his fellow classmates, SCU faculty, students, and staff, Panetta took everyone down memory lane. “Few of us could have imagined the events that would engulf us as we graduated from this university,” he said.
     
    Among the highlights: the election and assassination of John F. Kennedy, Dr. King’s marches, the Vietnam war, the tragic death of another Kennedy, Dr. King’s murder, the various movements – civil rights, women’s rights, environmental rights, Watergate, 9/11, Katrina, the gulf oil spill, two wars, and a recession.
     
    “From Beatles to Bono, from typewriters to computers, from the telephone to the iPhone, from facts to Facebook … we have seen a lot of change,” he said. “ Yet, America has survived.”
     
    As he expounded on the various ways the world has changed, Panetta shared the four key areas that inform the Central Intelligence Agency’s operations: counter terrorism, counter proliferation, cyber security, and global responsibility.
     
    “We know that terrorists will come at us any way they can,” he said. “Good intelligence is more vital than ever. We have to know many different languages and we have to have diversity in our agency. Our technology has to be on the cutting edge, we have to be ahead of our adversaries, and we have to be agile.”
     
    But, he stressed, given all of these challenges in a fast-changing, cyber-aware world one must not compromise on the values that this nation stands for.
     
    “We have to protect our people, gather intelligence, and conduct all operations in a way that upholds our laws,” he said.
     
    It’s no easy task leading the charge of the country’s premier intelligence agency … for Panetta, the beliefs and principles he formed as a student at Santa Clara have been a guiding force.
     
    “I am grateful for the education I received here,” he said. “The Jesuits not only gave me knowledge, they gave me an understanding of life. I learned that you have to question … and you have to have a willingness to fight for what you believe in.”
     
    There’s lots more; watch the full video of Panetta’s talk on campus.
     
    Mansi Bhatia
    University Writer/Editor