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Fall 2009 Faculty Grant Recipients

The Center for Science, Technology, and Society has announced the recipients of the fall grant program for both faculty and students.  Over $30,000 was allocated to the chosen proposals with approximately $20,000 going to faculty projects. There were a total of eight proposals from faculty members.

Project titles ranged from “Digital Inequality & Success in the Digital Job Market: Benefiting Disadvantaged Youth in the US and South America” in which Dr. Laura Robinson will work to develop a protocol whereby low-income high school students will receive training in computer skills that will allow them to be successful in entering the job market, to “Discovery of Drug Leads for Addressing Parasitic Diseases in the Developing World” in which Dr. Amelia Fuller will conduct research on the synthesis of an array of molecules that mimic anti-microbial peptides as leads for drugs against trypansomiastic diseases afflicting people in the developing world.

This inaugural competition supports projects that are commensurate with the Center’s mission, “to understand and enable the innovative application of science and technology for global human benefit.” CSTS is pleased to make these research awards, and hopes that these internal grants can help faculty seek additional, extra-mural funds, as well as continue to mentor our student scholars. The Center also encourages the integration of this research with new STS course development and the Values in Science & Technology pathway (also sponsored by CSTS).

The grant program is headed by Jack Gilbert, Professor and Chair of the Chemistry & Biochemistry department at Santa Clara University as well as Director of Sponsored Research at the Center, and Craig Stephens, Associate Professor of Biology and Director of Education at the Center.
 

 

Faculty Grant Recipients

Faculty Grant Recipients
From left to right: Don Dodson (Senior Vice Provost), Lucia Gilbert (Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs), Amelia Fuller (Assistant Professor - Chemistry & Biochemistry Department), Unyoung (Ashley) Kim (Assistant Professor - BioEngineering Program), Laura Robinson(Assistant Professor - Sociology Department), Teresa Ruscetti (Lecturer - Biology Department), Fr. Michael Engh (President)

Faculty Awards

Dr. Perlita Dicochea

Ethnic Studies Program
“Greening the Ghetto: The Promise of Job Creation for Low-income Communities in the Bay Area.”
Research will be directed toward addressing issues such as the extent to which cleantech can address the need for economic development in disenfranchised communities and will include assessing the roles that non-profit organizations, industry, and government play in “greening the ghetto.”

Dr. Amelia Fuller

Department of Chemistry & Biochemistry
“Discovery of Drug Leads for Addressing Parasitic Diseases in the Developing World.”
Research will be conducted on the synthesis of an array of molecules that mimic anti-microbial peptides as leads for drugs against trypansomiastic diseases afflicting people in the developing world.

Dr. Unyoung Kim

Bioengineering Program
“Development of an Electrochemical DNA Sensor for Rapid Detection of Pathogens.”
Research will be conducted into developing an aptamer-based sensor capable of continuous, real-time detection of multiple pathogens.

Dr. Hohyun Lee

Department of Mechanical Engineering
“Development of a Cost-Efficient and Less Electricity-Dependent Water Supply for Off-Grid Areas.”
An approach to water purification that uses compressed water vapor heated by fuels available in rural areas is to be developed. The goal is to provide clean water to off-grid villages.

Dr. Laura Robinson

Department of Sociology
“Digital Inequality & Success in the Digital Job Market: Benefiting Disadvantaged Youth in the US and South America.”
A protocol will be developed whereby low-income high school students will receive training in computer skills that will allow them to be successful in entering the job market.

Dr. Tracy Ruscetti

Department of Biology
“Effect of Severe Malnutrition on the Efficacy of Vaccines.”
Research will be conducted for developing an animal model to test the hypothesis that the lower efficacy of vaccines when administered to populations in the developing world may be associated with malnourishment.

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