Santa Clara University

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STS Minor

Open the pages of your favorite newspaper any day of the week. Stories about global warming, the latest advancements in robotics, the use of stem cells in research, and surveillance on the Internet abound.

DSC_0596Everyone who shapes public policy, law or choices in the marketplace must understand and respond to the scientific and technological dimensions of our society. Everyone who works on the latest scientific or technological advancements needs to anticipate and understand how these innovations will impact various stakeholders in society. And every day, we as voters and consumers confront choices with wide-ranging scientific, technological and social implications. Thus, today’s students, if they are to be engaged citizens of tomorrow’s world, will each be called upon to grasp the complex interrelationships between science, technology and society. This is the unique aim and promise of the STS minor: to provide SCU students with the academic foundation for becoming responsible and effective ‘technological citizens’, and leaders of a better and more just world.

Why STS?

shawn 1Distinguish yourself on the job market.

Today’s employers look for more than scientific and technological skills. They want fresh thinking leaders who can critically analyze the social and cultural aspects of new products, both their causes and effects. The STS minor develops the skills you need to enable businesses to thrive while contributing to a better world. Distinguish yourself and make a difference.

Open the door to a top graduate school.

The STS minor distinguishes your grad school application by demonstrating that you understand how science operates in the real world. Investigate the ways in which social values shape the trajectory of scientific discovery, and how the expansion of scientific knowledge in turn shapes them. Distinguish yourself and make a difference.

2Apply science and technology in service to global society.

World leaders must be able to understand the role of science and technology in global society. The world faces enormous challenges in the fields of energy, agriculture, public health, environmental management, and communication – and these all require solutions that use science, technology, innovation, and creativity. Through the STS minor, you can create solutions to these challenges. Distinguish yourself and make a difference.

 


Requirements

The minor consists of the following:

  • Four classes in one of the three emphasis areas
  • Any other three classes approved as undergraduate STS courses
  • Documented attendance and/or volunteering at four colloquia or conferences organized by CSTS
  • Submission of brief critical summaries of four colloquia or conferences organized CSTS for a pass/no-pass evaluation by the minor advisor

Emphasis areas

Information Technology & Society

Courses address the role of computers, the internet, and information technologies in modern society, and the transformative relationship between society and these technologies. Sample courses: COMM 12, Technology & Communication; OMIS 34, Information Technology, Business & Society; and SOC 49, Computers, Internet & Society.

COMM 12
Technology & Communication
COMM 149B
Science News
COSC 10
Introduction to Computer Science
ENGL 138
Internet Culture in the Information Society
ENVS 115
GIS in Environmental Studies
LBST 75
Educational Reform in America
MUSC 115
Thinking About Music Now
SOCI 49
Computers, Internet & Society
SOCI 120
Quantitative Methods & Applied Statistics
SOCI 149
Business, Technology & Society
ACTG 134
Accounting Information Systems
MGMT 177
Managing with the Internet
OMIS 34
Information Technology, Business & Society
   
Science & Technology for the Common Good

Courses examine how science and technology can contribute to social benefit, especially the well-being of underserved communities. They investigate the factors internal to the development of science and technology, as well as the societal factors (e.g., cultural, political, economic) that favor their development. Sample courses: ENVS 2, Energy & Society; PHIL 80, Science, Technology & Society; PHSC 100, Introduction to Epidemiology.

ANTH 133
Human Nutrition & Culture
ANTH 135
Human Development & Sexuality
ANTH 140
Food, Culture & Environment
BIOL 109
Genetics & Society
BIOL 135
Biofuels: Sustainable Energy for the Future?
BIOL 159
Plagues in the Age of Insects
BIOL 171
Social & Ethical Dimensions of Biotechnology
COMM 149B
Science News
COMM 164A
Race, Gender & Public Health
ENVS 2
Energy & the Environment
ENVS 10
The Joy of Garbage
ENVS 80
Energy and the Environment
ENVS 135
Biofuels: Sustainable Energy for the Future?
ENVS 145
Environmental Technology
ENVS 153
Conservation Science
HIST 123
History of Plagues, Epidemics & Infections
HIST 125
History of the Senses
PHIL 80
Science, Technology & Society
PHIL 140
Philosophy of Science
PHIL xxx
Prenatal Humans, Science & Social Values
PHIL xxx
Neuroscience, Values & the Law
PSYC 50
Ways of Knowing
PSYC 158
Conservation Psychology
PSYC xxx
Neuroscience, Values & the Law
PHSC 1
Human Health & Disease
PHSC 28
Human Sexuality
PHSC 100
Introduction to Epidemiology
PHSC 120
Technology, Innovation & Public Health
SOCI 49
Computers, Internet & Society
SOCI 149
Business, Technology & Society
OMIS 80
The World Food System
ENGR 60
Sustainable Electric Energy for the 21st Century
ENGR 160
Nanotechnology & Society
MECH 144 Smart Product Design
Science Communication

Courses examine how expert scientific knowledge has been and can be communicated to scientific and lay audiences. This includes communication within research communities, communication of scientific and technical information to the public, and science and technology communication policy. Sample courses: ANTH 5, Popular Culture & Bioanthropology; COMM 149B Science News; PHYS 5, The Science of Star Trek.

ANTH 4
Vanished Peoples & Lost Civilizations
ANTH 5
Popular Culture & Bioanthropology
ANTH 132
Paleoanthropology ANTH 133
Human Nutrition & Culture
ANTH 135
Human Development & Sexuality
ANTH 147
The Archaeology of Complex Societies
BIOL 109
Genetics & Society
BIOL 135
Biofuels: Sustainable Energy for the Future?
BIO 142 Natural History of California BIOL 144 Baja Natural History
BIOL 159
Plagues in the Age of Insects
BIOL 171
Social & Ethical Dimensions of Biotechnology
COMM 149B
Science News
COMM 164A
Race, Gender & Public Health
ENGL 138
Internet Culture in the Information Society
ENVS 2
Energy & the Environment
ENVS 10
The Joy of Garbage

ENVS 115
GIS in Environmental Studies
ENVS 135
Biofuels: Sustainable Energy for the Future?
ENVS 144
Baja Natural History
ENVS 145
Environmental Technology
ENVS 153
Conservation Science
MUSC 115
Thinking About Music Now
PHIL xxx
Prental Humans, Science & Social Values
PHIL xxx
Neuroscience, Values & the Law
PHYS 5
The Science of Star Trek
PHYS 8
Intro to Space Sciences
PSYC 158
Conservation Psychology
PSYC xxx
Neuroscience, Values & the Law
PHSC 28
Human Sexuality
PHSC 100
Introduction to Epidemiology
PHSC 120
Technology, Innovation & Public Health
OMIS 80
The World Food System
ENGR 60
Sustainable Electric Energy for the 21st Century
ENGR 160
Nanotechnology & Society
 MECH 141  Mechanical Vibrations
 MECH 144
 Smart Product Design
   

spring conference imageSTS Minor Faculty Contacts

Keith Warner, O.F.M.

Lecturer, Religious Studies Department
Assistant Director of Education (Core Curriculum), Center for Science, Technology, and Society
Kwarner@scu.edu

Craig Stephens

Professor, Biology Department
Director of Public Health Program and Combined Sciences major
Director of Education for the Center for Science, Technology, and Society
CStephens@scu.edu

Participating Departments

Accounting
Anthropology
Biology
Communication
Computer Science
English
Environmental Studies
History
Liberal Studies
Music
Philosophy
Physics
Psychology
Public Health Science
Sociology
Management
Operations Management & Information Systems
Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering
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