Santa Clara University

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Calendar

 
"Economy and Security in the 21st Century" with Madeleine Albright
  • Tuesday, May 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    How can America retain its leadership role amidst rapid globalization? Is America truly the indispensable nation? How do domestic politics influence foreign policy?


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
#TWEET: Santa Clara University Choirs
  • Friday, Mar 6, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     Contemporary music technology, 16th century madrigals, and everything in between. The songs of birds serve as a starting place for an evening full of innovation from one of the original sources of musical inspiration. Combined with live audience feedback and interactive compositions, it’s a night where you'll want to make sure your smartphone is anything but off.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
3rd Annual Women's Water Polo Fundraiser
  • Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 9:30 PM

    Join us for the 3rd Annual Women's Water Polo Fundraising Dinner at the Los Gatos Brewing Co. in downtown San Jose! Last year, we raised over $15,000 and our goal is to raise even more this year! In addition to food and drinks, we will have team-sponsored raffle baskets, silent and live auction items. Bring your cash/checks and competitive spirit!

    RSVP TODAY!



     


    Cost: $50-$125 per person
    Location:
         Los Gatos Brewing Co.
Advent Afternoon of Reflection
  • Sunday, Dec 7, 2014 from 11:30 AM to 2:00 PM

    Amid the crush of Christmas activities and mindful of the busyness of the season, Fr. Rob Scholla, S.J. will lead us in reflecting on the gifts of our God who comes to us at Christmas. Using scripture, poetry and works of religious art, Fr. Scholla, S.J. will facilitate this time together.  Light lunch will be served. All are welcome! Cost:   $25  per person 

    RSVP


    Cost: $25
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
Advent Celebration
Advent Reconciliation
Alumni Association Board of Director's Meeting
Alumni Association Board of Director's Meeting
An Evening with Andy Ackerman
  • Monday, Feb 9, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    Hear Andy Ackerman ’78 in conversation about directing and producing some of TV’s funniest and most beloved series, including Seinfeld, The New Adventures of Old Christine, and Curb Your Enthusiasm.


    Cost: Yes
    Location: Mayer Theatre
An Evening with Flowers - Ikebana Art
  • Thursday, Nov 13, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 6:45 PM

    Learn the Trinity concept of Ikebana Art - Create your own Ikebana

    Demonstration and workshop by Kika Shibata, Director of Sogetsu Ikebana Art School - Tokyo, Japan; Coordinator of Sogetsu Nnorth American Region

    Refreshments Served!

    If you have a disability and require accommodation, please call Benson Memorial Center's Event Planning office (408) 554-2326 or 1-800-735-2929, 48 hours prior to event


    Cost: Free
    Location:
         Learning Commons, Library Viewing Room A
Ash Wednesday Tri-School Liturgy
Be the Change
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014

    The “Be the Change” special interest group. Our group will share information on volunteer activities, especially in the local community.

    Our primary goals are to:

    • Sponsor forums that highlight volunteer opportunities and speakers from various non- profit organizations.
    • Locate and publicize both one-time and ongoing volunteer opportunities.
    • Schedule on-site visits to local non-profit organizations to learn more about their individual missions and potential volunteer opportunities.
    • Form a community of support to facilitate OLLI members contributing to both the local and global community.
    • Our next meeting will be on Monday October 27, 2014. If you would like to join our special interest group, or just be on our e-mail list to learn about presentations and/or field trips, please contact Debbie Schreibstein at e-mail address: Lendebsch@aol.com

Behind the Scenes: Santa Clara Chorale's
  • Thursday, Dec 11, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    In December of 1914, German and English soldiers on the front lines of World War I set aside their weapons and took up carols in an historic impromptu truce. One-hundred years later, the Chorale remembers this demonstration of humanity through the singing of carols and songs known to be sung at the event, interspersed with readings from contemporary soldiers’ letters and seasonal choral pieces.

    Beginning first from the historical perspective, the class will explore what actually happened between the soldiers on the front line. We will explore soldier's letters and contemporary newspaper accounts of the events to understand how such an event unfolded and how the public and military leadership reacted. Additionally, Hanna-Weir will guide the class through the process of selecting the repertoire, assembling the program, and preparing the chorus for the event.

    Instructor: 

    Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Before coming to California, Hanna-Weir directed the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC. He has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Orchestral Institute, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio. Comfortable in a variety of genres and styles, Hanna-Weir is a frequent collaborator as conductor, clinician, singer, and pianist with soloists, choirs, composers, and ensembles from a variety of backgrounds and traditions.
     
    Class: Thursday, December 11,  2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m, Loyola Hall Room 160
     
    Performance: Friday, December 12 Start Time 8 p.m, Mission Church 
    --one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  December 11)

     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Dec 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    In December of 1914, German and English soldiers on the front lines of World War I set aside their weapons and took up carols in an historic impromptu truce. One-hundred years later, the Chorale remembers this demonstration of humanity through the singing of carols and songs known to be sung at the event, interspersed with readings from contemporary soldiers’ letters and seasonal choral pieces.

    Beginning first from the historical perspective, the class will explore what actually happened between the soldiers on the front line. We will explore soldier's letters and contemporary newspaper accounts of the events to understand how such an event unfolded and how the public and military leadership reacted. Additionally, Hanna-Weir will guide the class through the process of selecting the repertoire, assembling the program, and preparing the chorus for the event.

    Instructor: 

    Scot Hanna-Weir is the Artistic Director of the Santa Clara Chorale and Director of Choral Activities at Santa Clara University. He holds a Doctor of Musical Arts in choral conducting from the University of Maryland, a MM from the University of Wisconsin, and a BM from the University of North Carolina Greensboro. Before coming to California, Hanna-Weir directed the All Souls Choir at All Souls Church, Unitarian in Washington, DC. He has prepared choirs for the National Symphony Orchestra, the National Orchestral Institute, the Army Field Band and Soldier’s Chorus, and the Maryland Opera Studio. Comfortable in a variety of genres and styles, Hanna-Weir is a frequent collaborator as conductor, clinician, singer, and pianist with soloists, choirs, composers, and ensembles from a variety of backgrounds and traditions.
     
    Class: Thursday, December 11,  2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m, Loyola Hall Room 160
     
    Performance: Friday, December 12 Start Time 8 p.m, Mission Church 
    --one hour post-matinee discussion
    (You will get your ticket at class session,  December 11)

     

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Bike SIG
  • Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014 at 1:00 PM

     2-3 hour ride on Coyote Creek trail

    Place: Metcalf park bathrooms, Forsum Road, San Jose


    Location:
         Place: Metcalf park bathrooms, Forsum Road, San Jose
Bike SIG
  • Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014 at 10:00 AM

     Place: 85 overpass at Heatherstone and Dale, Sunnyvale

    2-3 hour ride on Stevens creek trail to Bay Trail to San Tomas Trail

    Location:
         Place: 85 overpass at Heatherstone and Dale, Sunnyvale
BlackRock Info Session
  • Monday, Nov 3, 2014 at 6:00 PM

     Hear from BlackRock representatives about the company and potential job/internship opportunities.  Seeking Computer Science majors.


    Location: Benson Center
         Conference Room 21
Book of the Quarter: La Verdad Y La Justicia: Witnessing Truth in the Service of Justice
  • Wednesday, Nov 12, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 5:15 PM

    In commemoration of the 25th anniversary of the assassination of the Jesuits and their collaborators at the Universidad de Centroamerica (UCA) in El Salvador, Santa Clara University co-published with Orbis Press: La Verdad: Witness to the Salvadoran Martyrs. It is this fall's Book of the Quarter. La Verdad is the firsthand account of the El Salvador martyrdoms and the process of resettling in the United States by Lucia Cerna, a housekeeper at the UCA, accompanied by a reading of El Salvador's history and the vagaries of the American immigration system by local scholar and professor, Mary Jo Ignoffo.  Lucia Cerna and Mary Jo Ignoffo will reflect together with Luis Calero, S.J. on the events of November 16, 1989 and share about the larger context, implications, and significance of this anniversary for El Salvador, the United States, and Santa Clara University.    

    Reception immediately following. 

    All alumni of past SCU El Salvador immersions and the Casa de la Solidaridad are particularly invited to attend. 
     
    Co-sponsored with the Ignation Center for Jesuit Education (Bannan Institute), Office of Undergraduate Studies, and the President’s Office 

    Location: Learning Commons and Library, St. Clare Room
Boston AFO- Volunteer at Greater Boston Food Bank
Brazil for Beginners: an Introduction to the History, Politics and People That Made Modern Day Brazil
  • Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014 from 4:00 PM to 6:00 PM

    Register Here

    This class covers Brazil’s history from the period prior to the arrival of the Portuguese to the present day. The first half of the course deals with the Colonial and Imperial periods and the second with the Republics (since 1889). Focus will be on major political changes, such as independence, wars, popular uprisings, and systems of government. The course will also highlight important Brazilian leaders.

    Instructor:
    Michael L. Conniff, Professor of History at San Jose State University, earned degrees at UC Berkeley and Stanford and has published a number of books on modern history, most recently Panama and the United States (2012), A History of Modern Latin America (2005, with Lawrence Clayton), Populism in Latin America (2012), and Africans in the Americas (2003, with T. J. Davis). He has lived overseas for a dozen years, held several post-docs (including three Fulbright tours), and served in the U.S. Peace Corps. He lectures often in Portuguese and Spanish. Before joining SJSU, he taught history at the University of New Mexico and later led efforts to create Latin American studies programs at Auburn University and the University of South Florida. He also founded the Global Studies program at SJSU. He has won and managed grants and contracts worth more than four million dollars. Dr. Conniff spent spring 2014 as the Bacardi Eminent Professor of Latin American Studies at the University of Florida. 

    Long Course, Other Dates: September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Library Viewing & Taping Room A


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
Broncos Go Social: Bronco Basketball Luxury Suite
  • Friday, Nov 14, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    Catch all the action as the Broncos take on Cal State Fullerton in the 2014-15 season home-opener. Guests will enjoy the game from the comfort of the Leavey Center luxury suite that includes catered appetizers and hosted beer/wine. Only 25 tickets available, so sign up today!

    Who is a young alum? We define "young alumni" as those who graduated between 2005-2014 and are 35 years old or younger. As always, we welcome alumni from all classes to enjoy our "young alumni" events.

    RSVP TODAY!


    Cost: $25
    Location: Leavey Center
Broncos Go Social: Your Future with Money
  • Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    Learn the ins and outs of financial management. This seminar will feature Peter Verbica, class of '82, J.D. '99 and Financial Advisor for Merrill Lynch Wealth Management. Topics to be covered include retirement plans, investments, and much more!

    Light appetizers and beverages provided.


    Who is a young alum? We define "young alumni" as those who graduated between 2005-2014 and are 35 years old or younger. As always, we welcome alumni from all classes to enjoy our "young alumni" events.

    RSVP TODAY!


    Cost: $5
    Location: Donohoe Alumni House
Broncos Take On The Spartans: Meet & Greet
  • Sunday, Nov 23, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM

    Join fellow Broncos as you watch the men's basketball team prepare for their game against the Spartans of Michigan State. A player and coach meet and greet will follow practice.

    The time for this event will be between 10am and 2pm. Once a final practice time is scheduled, the Alumni Association will contact you immediately with more event details.

    RSVP Online


    Cost: No Charge
    Location:
         Breslin Center, Michigan State Campus
Broncos Take On The Spartans: Reception & Basketball Game
  • Monday, Nov 24, 2014 from 5:00 PM to 6:30 PM

    Enjoy a reception prior to the Santa Clara versus Michigan State men's basketball game! The reception will feature food, drink, and a "chalk talk" from a member of the coaching staff. Following the reception, guests will attend the basketball game and cheer the Broncos on to victory!

    $30 per person includes heavy hosted appetizers and a game ticket.

    RSVP Online
     


    Cost: $30 per person
    Location:
         Dubling Square Pub and Breslin Center
Bruno Ruviaro - Electronic Music
Cañada College Transfer Day - Redwood City, CA
Careers for the Common Good Industry Panel
  • Thursday, Feb 12, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    A panel of alums and other professionals working in industries including social entrepreneurship, healthcare, corporate social responsibility, nonprofits and more will share their reflections and insights on their work and industry.  The panel will be followed by an informal networking hour.


    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
Central Coast 41st Annual Dinner
Chair Massages
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 10:15 AM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 10:15 AM to 10:30 AM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 10:30 AM to 10:45 AM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 10:45 AM to 11:00 AM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 11:00 AM to 11:15 AM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 11:15 AM to 11:30 AM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 11:30 AM to 11:45 AM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:00 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 12:15 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 12:15 PM to 12:30 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 12:30 PM to 12:45 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 12:45 PM to 1:00 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 1:45 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 1:45 PM to 2:00 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 2:15 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 2:30 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 2:30 PM to 2:45 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 3:00 PM to 3:15 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 3:15 PM to 3:30 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 3:30 PM to 3:45 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 3:45 PM to 4:00 PM
    The Mission to Wellness program is offering 13 minute chair massages for $5.00. We have partnered with Massage Therapist Brandon Reynolds. Brandon will be offering chair massages in the Wellness Room located in Human Resources.
    Cost: $5.00
    Location: 475 El Camino Real
         Wellness Room
Chicago Happy Hour
  • Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014 at 5:30 PM

    Come join fellow Broncos in Chicago for Happy Hour Wednesday, November 5th at 5:30 PM. Celebrate getting through half the week with great friends. Hope to see you there!

    RSVP Online

     


    Location:
         Glascott's Saloon
Christmas Eve Liturgy (5 pm)
Christmas Eve Liturgy (9 pm)
CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series
  • Monday, Oct 20, 2014 from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series

     

    Welcome!  The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This new series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.  We hope to see you soon!   

    Fall Quarter Event Information:

    cie entrepreneur forum fall 14Mondays, 8-9 pm, Lucas 106-Reddy Executive Classroom

     9/29:     Kevin McMahon, ArtHeroes
     10/6:     Brienne Ghafourifar, Entefy **Special time**--7:30 pm-8:30 pm
     10/13:   Alina Adams, Volyy, LLC
     10/20:   Matt Oscamou, Frontier Snacks
     10/27:   Abram Dawson, SV Angel
     11/3:     Andy Bartley, One Medical Group
     11/10:    Jacquetta Lannan, Chez Franc
     11/17:    Mike Kyriacou, Great Big Enterprises

     

    Registration not required, all are welcome!


    Cost: Free-join us!
    Location: Lucas Hall
         Classroom 106-Reddy Executive Conference Room
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series

     

    Welcome!  The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This new series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.  We hope to see you soon!   

    Fall Quarter Event Information:

    cie entrepreneur forum fall 14Mondays, 8-9 pm, Lucas 106-Reddy Executive Classroom

     9/29:     Kevin McMahon, ArtHeroes
     10/6:     Brienne Ghafourifar, Entefy **Special time**--7:30 pm-8:30 pm
     10/13:   Alina Adams, Volyy, LLC
     10/20:   Matt Oscamou, Frontier Snacks
     10/27:   Abram Dawson, SV Angel
     11/3:     Andy Bartley, One Medical Group
     11/10:    Jacquetta Lannan, Chez Franc
     11/17:    Mike Kyriacou, Great Big Enterprises

     

    Registration not required, all are welcome!


    Cost: Free-join us!
    Location: Lucas Hall
         Classroom 106-Reddy Executive Conference Room
  • Monday, Nov 3, 2014 from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series

     

    Welcome!  The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This new series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.  We hope to see you soon!   

    Fall Quarter Event Information:

    cie entrepreneur forum fall 14Mondays, 8-9 pm, Lucas 106-Reddy Executive Classroom

     9/29:     Kevin McMahon, ArtHeroes
     10/6:     Brienne Ghafourifar, Entefy **Special time**--7:30 pm-8:30 pm
     10/13:   Alina Adams, Volyy, LLC
     10/20:   Matt Oscamou, Frontier Snacks
     10/27:   Abram Dawson, SV Angel
     11/3:     Andy Bartley, One Medical Group
     11/10:    Jacquetta Lannan, Chez Franc
     11/17:    Mike Kyriacou, Great Big Enterprises

     

    Registration not required, all are welcome!


    Cost: Free-join us!
    Location: Lucas Hall
         Classroom 106-Reddy Executive Conference Room
  • Monday, Nov 10, 2014 from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series

     

    Welcome!  The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This new series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.  We hope to see you soon!   

    Fall Quarter Event Information:

    cie entrepreneur forum fall 14Mondays, 8-9 pm, Lucas 106-Reddy Executive Classroom

     9/29:     Kevin McMahon, ArtHeroes
     10/6:     Brienne Ghafourifar, Entefy **Special time**--7:30 pm-8:30 pm
     10/13:   Alina Adams, Volyy, LLC
     10/20:   Matt Oscamou, Frontier Snacks
     10/27:   Abram Dawson, SV Angel
     11/3:     Andy Bartley, One Medical Group
     11/10:    Jacquetta Lannan, Chez Franc
     11/17:    Mike Kyriacou, Great Big Enterprises

     

    Registration not required, all are welcome!


    Cost: Free-join us!
    Location: Lucas Hall
         Classroom 106-Reddy Executive Conference Room
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 8:00 PM to 9:00 PM

     

    CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series

     

    Welcome!  The Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship invites you to attend our new CIE Entrepreneur Forum Speaker Series.  This new series addresses topics of interest to entrepreneurs and provides students with an opportunity to experience "the startup story" directly from alumni living it each day.  The intimate format is designed to give you a greater connection with the speaker and provides ample opportunity for Q&A.  We hope to see you soon!   

    Fall Quarter Event Information:

    cie entrepreneur forum fall 14Mondays, 8-9 pm, Lucas 106-Reddy Executive Classroom

     9/29:     Kevin McMahon, ArtHeroes
     10/6:     Brienne Ghafourifar, Entefy **Special time**--7:30 pm-8:30 pm
     10/13:   Alina Adams, Volyy, LLC
     10/20:   Matt Oscamou, Frontier Snacks
     10/27:   Abram Dawson, SV Angel
     11/3:     Andy Bartley, One Medical Group
     11/10:    Jacquetta Lannan, Chez Franc
     11/17:    Mike Kyriacou, Great Big Enterprises

     

    Registration not required, all are welcome!


    Cost: Free-join us!
    Location: Lucas Hall
         Classroom 106-Reddy Executive Conference Room
CIE Presents: Fall Quarter Office Hours for Entrepreneurs with Ellie Ahi
  • Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

     

    CIE Presents: Fall Quarter Office Hours with Ellie Ahi

    Fall Quarter CIE Office Hours for Entrepreneurs Welcomes Ellie Ahi


    Tuesday, October 21, 2014
    1 pm-4 pm-Appointments Required

     

    The CIE is pleased to present Office Hours for Entrepreneurs with Allie Ahi on Tuesday, October 21, appointments are required.  Use your 25 minute appointment to discuss your business plan or presentation, tweak your executive summary, critique your pitch or get answers to your general startup questions.  To schedule your appointment, please send your 3 available meeting time preferences to Linda Jenkins at ljenkins@scu.edu, before Thursday, October 16.   Meeting Times (submit 3 in order of preference-appointments will be scheduled on a first-come, first served basis):
       1:00 pm-1:25 pm
       1:30 pm-1:55 pm
       2:00 pm-2:25 pm
       2:30 pm-2:55 pm
       3:00 pm-3:25 pm
       3:30 pm-3:55 pm
    About Michele Ellie Ahi:  Presently Co-Founder and President of Technology for myBiograph, Inc., Ellie Ahi is also an Adjunct Professor in the SCU School of Engineering, and an Investor/Member of the Software Committee of Keiretsu Forum.  She was the Co-Founder and President of Technology for AppsClip, acquired in 2013.

     


    Cost: Free, but appointments are required.
    Location: Lucas Hall
Climate Change in the 21st Century
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
  • Monday, Nov 3, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
  • Monday, Nov 10, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
  • Monday, Dec 1, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Climate change is happening now, and according to the latest reports from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the U.S. Global Change Research Program, multiple lines of independent evidence confirm that human activities are the primary cause of the warming observed over the past 50 years. The burning of coal, oil, and gas, and clearing of forests have increased the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by more than 40% since the Industrial Revolution, and continued business-as-usual consumption of fossil fuels will result in average warming of 5 to 10 degrees F by the end of the 21st century.  In this course we’ll explore the evidence that leads to these conclusions.  We’ll also discuss economic impacts and possible steps to mitigate the worst effects.  The goal of the course is to acquaint the student with the basic ideas, lines of evidence, and scientific consensus about our climate and its future. 

    Instructor:  David Shortt is a physicist who directs advanced R&D at KLA-Tencor Corporation, a leading semiconductor equipment manufacturer.  He holds bachelors’ degrees from M.I.T. in Physics and in Electrical Engineering, and a Ph.D. in Physics from Stanford University.  Dr. Shortt is a seasoned instructor with SCU’s Osher program and has interests in optics, astronomy, geology, and the natural world in general. 

     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 27 and November 3, 10, 17, and December 1

    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Wiegand Room 102 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
Combined Choral Concert
Commencement Recital
CPSY x283: Aperture: Finding the Opening in Couples Therapy
  • Saturday, Dec 6, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x283: Aperture: Finding the Opening in Couples Therapy

    DATE: Saturday, December 6 *Must register by November 26

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 5.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This course will present Aperture as the powerful central focus for couples therapy. In it we will discuss the neurological concomitants of this openness, what we know about the conditions that result in opening or closing, interventions for maximal effectiveness in opening apertures, use of the evaluation and early sessions in relation to ApertureTM, maximizing early progress, and the relationship between ApertureTM as a focus and the various models for couples therapy.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Explain the relevance of a focus on Aperture for couples therapy.
    • Be able to practice the interventions flexibly in response to the diversity, culturally and otherwise, in their clients.
    • Describe the possible neurological correlates of Aperture.
    • Discuss how to use Aperture awareness to guide their interventions.
    • Perform interventions for opening Aperture through: eye contact, pacing, balance, internal self-management, reassurance, and inquiry.
    • Describe the relationship between Aperture focus and treatment models.
    • Discuss methods for maximizing early change.

    TARGET AUDIENCE: This course is appropriate for clinical practitioners working with individual, couples or families and for graduate students working toward degrees leading to the practice of psychotherapy including individual, couples and family therapies.

    Level: Introductory

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Kathryn Ford, M.D. has been working with couples for 20 years and has a private practice in Menlo Park. She has developed Learning Partners, an approach to helping couples see their difficulties as part of their development and to bring their creative strengths into the relationship. She has taught and supervised at Stanford University School of Medicine and at local graduate schools of psychology, including The Institute of Transpersonal Psychology and Santa Clara University. She received her M.D. from Brown Medical School and completed her training in psychiatry at Stanford.

     

    In addition to teaching and her clinical practice, Dr. Ford offers individuals a group consultation to therapists and workshops for both couples and therapists.   


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x284: Being a More Effective Therapist: Understanding What Clients Bring to the Table
  • Saturday, Oct 25, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    CPSY x284: Being a More Effective Therapist: Understanding What Clients Bring to the Table

    DATE: Saturday, October 25 *Must register by October 15

    TIME: 9 AM-12 PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    Workshop Fee: $72

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 2.75 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science.

    Course Description: 

    This course will review the research on how clients act as active self-healers in psychotherapy. It will also consider the implications of these findings for practice and make a number of suggestions for better improving the quality of your clients' participation in therapy. The recent development of "feedback-informed therapy" will be discussed in this context. Brief exercises will be used to bring the material alive. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe two relevant research findings that illustrate the role of client agency in psychotherapy.
    • List the factors involved in promoting client engagement in psychotherapy & cite two relevant research findings.
    • Describe 3 client characteristics that can interfere with productive involvement in psychotherapy & discuss ways of dealing with them.
    • Explain what effective collaboration & empathy really mean & how they operate in psychotherapy.
    • Describe ways clients are creative in psychotherapy and approaches to facilitating creativity. 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Anyone who does psychotherapy or counseling, such as clinical psychologists, marriage & family therapists, licensed professional counselors, addiction counselors, social workers, psychiatrists, or psychiatric nurses.

    Level: Introductory

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Arthur C. Bohart, PhD, is professor emeritus at California State University Dominguez Hills. His work has focused on empathy in psychotherapy, on the role of the client as active self-healer in psychotherapy, and on the role of experiencing in psychotherapy. Dr. Bohart's books include Empathy Reconsidered: New Directions in Psychotherapy (with Leslie S. Greenberg, 1997) and How Clients Make Therapy Work: The Process of Active Self-Healing (with Karen Tallman). His latest book, co-edited with Barbara S. Held, Edward Mendelowitz, and Kirk J. Schneider, was published by the American Psychological Association (2012), entitled Humanity's Dark Side: Evil, Destructive Experience, and Psychotherapy.


    Cost: $72
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x320: Understanding and Working with Children from Addicted Families
  • Saturday, Nov 15, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:30 PM

    CPSY x320 - Understanding and Working with Children from Addicted Families 

    DATE: Saturday, November 15 *Must register by November 5

    TIME: 9-4:30PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 134

    WORKSHOP FEE: $180

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 6 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Boards of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    In this course, psychotherapists will come to understand the experience of growing up in a home with one or more addicted parents. The presenters experience as Coordinator of the Betty Ford Center Childrens Program provides understanding & resources to share in this training. Childrens artwork will assist in illustrating the feelings experienced by children in homes with active addiction, as well as the conflicting feelings that come with parents recovery. The children make some family dynamics evident as well. Understanding the neuroscience of the disease of addiction, recovery, and relapse is crucial to working with children. Throughout the days activities will assist in illustrating the concepts presented, and copies of many activities appropriate for individual, family, and group therapy will be provided along with bibliographies of books appropriate for children, parents, and therapists.

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

     

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Discuss addictive family dynamics and the effects on children.
    • Describe the roles children often take in their families and select tools to help them understand the importance of their defenses, and how to safely choose when they are helpful or not.
    • Explain the disease concept of addiction, and approaches to simplifying for children.
    • List specific kinds of support to offer children from addicted families.
    • Discuss individual resiliency factors & environmental protective factors.
    • Critique several activities that can be used in individual, family, & group therapy situations.

    TARGET AUDIENCE: MFT's, LCSW's, LPCC's, Psychologists, and Addiction Counselors.

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Wendy Wade has been involved with children and parents throughout her career, beginning with her work with children of addicted parents in 1979, through elementary school teaching and administration. She worked at Betty Ford Center as Coordinator of their unique program for children of addicted parents, and has provided many trainings and conference presentations, both locally and nationally, on the disease of addiction and working with children of addicted parents. She has combined her experience in education with her psychotherapy training to work for Santa Cruz Country Children’s Mental Health. She has three articles published in professional journals, and is beginning work on a book on the experience of a person’s Catholicism in drug and alcohol recovery. Her education includes a BA in psychology from Stanford University, a Master’s Degree in Marriage, Family and Child Counseling from Santa Clara University, a teaching credential from San Jose State University, an Educational Administration credential from Santa Clara University, and a PhD from Pacifica Graduate Institute. She has an LPCC license and is certified as a CADC 1 counselor.


    Cost: $180
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 134
CPSY x647: Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    CPSY x647– Child Abuse Assessment and Reporting

    DATE: Friday, December 5 *Must register by November 26

    TIME: 9-5PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $192

     

     

     

    Course meets the qualifications for 7 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    The course will meet all of the requirements of California Business and Professions Code Section 28. Training will be provided in child abuse assessment and reporting including detailed knowledge of the Child Abuse and Neglect Reporting Act and the assessment and method of reporting of sexual assault, neglect, severe neglect, general neglect, willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment, corporal punishment or injury, and abuse in out-of-home care.
     
    LEARNING OBJECTIVES
    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:
    • Discuss mandatory child abuse law requirements, rights, responsibilities, and methods of reporting.
    • Recite law definitions of sexual assault, neglect, severe neglect, general neglect, willful cruelty or unjustifiable punishment, corporate punishment or injury, and abuse in out-of-home care.
    • Predict consequences of failure to report, and assess how to provide for a child's need after a report is made.
    • Discuss assessment considerations.
    • Discuss basic crisis counseling considerations and techniques.
    • Explain the impact of abuse and neglect on children and adults.
    • Predict traumatic impact of abuse and neglect and related implications for treatment, and evidence based forms of treatment for children and adults.
     

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Marriage & Family Therapists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Social Workers, Educator (K12 & Higher Education), Educational Leader (K12 & Higher Education), Graduate Students and Undergraduate Students. 

    LEVEL: Intermediate

     INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Steve Baron, M.A., MFT, is the retired director of Family Court Services in Santa Clara County, California, former adjunct faculty for the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges on the subject of juvenile dependency mediation, retired from 25 years of private practice, an occasional trainer for the California Administrative Office of the Courts, the Superior Court in Santa Clara County, and various community agencies on subjects including domestic violence, the impact of trauma on child development and victims of domestic violence, trauma-informed systems, mediation and custody evaluation, and ethics, and has been the recipient of awards from Legal Advocates for Children and Youth for services to families and children, “The Judge Len Edwards Champion of Peace Award” from the Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Council, and the Santa Clara County Psychological Association for the training of mental health professionals in the areas of divorce, child custody, and domestic violence.  He has been a lecturer for Santa Clara University in the graduate Counseling Psychology division for the past 27 years on subjects including child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, elder abuse, and trauma. He has authored or co-authored articles for the Family Court Review, California’s Journal of the Center for Families, Children & the Courts, and the Juvenile and Family Court Journal.

     


    Cost: $192
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x660: Treating Sexual Desire Discrepancy
  • Friday, Nov 21, 2014 at 9:00 AM to Saturday, Nov 22, 2014 at 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    CPSY x660: Treating Sexual Desire Discrepancy

    DATE: Friday, November 21 &  Saturday, November 22 *Must register by November 12

    TIME: 9-3PM each day (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $288

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 9.5 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Systemic and intrapsychic perspectives are provided as organizing frameworks for treating sexual desire discrepancy, with special attention to understanding the meaning underneath details of sexual behavior. The course emphasizes using sexual difficulties for psychological and emotional development. The course includes practical application (via case studies, role plays, and skill building exercises) for better learning, understanding and integration of this perspective into clinical practice. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe the systemic concept of desire discrepancy within a couple.
    • List some common presentations of this clinical problem.
    • Recognize differences in the systemic relationship between desire discrepancy and other common relationship problems.
    • Compare the systemic nature of desire discrepancy to other more linear clinical approaches.
    • Formulate a systemic "big picture" description of the couple dynamics.
    • Demonstrate how to intervene in the couple system using this "big picture" to provide forward movement in the system.
    • Analyze family of origin, dyadic and intrapsychic issues displayed through the clients' sexual behavior. 

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Clinicians wishing to expand and update their expertise treating sexual desire discrepancy and other sexual difficulties. This 10-hour course will fulfill the BBS requirement for study of human sexuality.

    Level: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Monica Stone MFT maintains a full time private practice in Menlo Park where she treats couples and individuals and runs time limited women's sexuality groups. She has specialized in treating sexual issues since 1996, receiving her AASECT Sex Therapist Certification in 2001. 


    Cost: $288
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CPSY x762: Courageous Conversations about Culture and Diversity
  • Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM

    CPSY x762: Courageous Conversations about Culture and Diversity

    DATE: Saturday, November 8 *Must register by October 29

    TIME: 9-4PM (lunch provided)

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $168

     

     

     

    Course meets qualifications for 5.25 hours of continuing education credit for MFTs and/or LCSWs as required by the California Board of Behavioral Science. 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This course explores how integration of both self-awareness and others' worldview has increased, but it continues to necessitate further development. It goes into the challenge that remains, how we address, integrate, and ultimately talk about matters of culture. In this workshop, the instructors propose an 8-step model for how to effectively engage in Courageous Conversations about culture and diversity. Their approach provides practical and enriching tools that further the concept of broaching cultural issues in clinical settings, supervisory relationships, the classroom, and organizations. They also facilitate experiential small group exercises that cultivate the essential skills that ultimately help us engage, connect, and build lasting relationships necessary for intimate and genuine dialogue regarding culture. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Describe the meaning of courageous conversations & their clinical importance.
    • Recognize the differences in the types of broaching.
    • Identify and apply guidelines to engaging in courageous conversations.
    • Demonstrate courageous conversations in small groups.
    • Design a plan of action for engaging in courageous conversations in your own applied settings.

    TARGET AUDIENCE: Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Marriage & Family Therapists, Occupational Therapists, Speech Therapists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Social Workers, Nurses, Physicians, Educator (K12 & Higher Education), Educational Leader (K12 & Higher Education), Graduate Students, and Undergraduate Students. 

    LEVEL: Intermediate

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Dr. Alicia del Prado is a psychologist who works in clinical and academic roles. She provides therapy and consulting services as well as teaches, conducts research, and facilitates seminars. She works with clients on a variety of concerns, such as depression, anxiety, trauma, relationship problems, body image, career issues, and stress management. She earned her Ph.D. in Counseling Psychology from Washington State University in 2007. She worked at U.C. Berkeley from 2006-2008 where she completed her predoctoral internship and postdoctoral fellowship. Prior to graduate school, she received her B.S. in Psychology from Santa Clara University in 2000.

     

     

     

     

    Dr. Anatasia Kim is a cognitive-behavioral therapist whose primary areas of interest are child/adolescent development and minority mental health. Her clinical training and experience have involved working in multiple therapeutic contexts, the use of multidisciplinary resources and efforts, and the management of a diversity of mental health concerns. She has worked with children/adolescents and their families in the contexts of schools, day-treatment programs, hospitals, probation programs, foster care, residential care, social and protective services, home-based services, outpatient clinics, and private practice. She received her B.A. in Psychology at the University of California, Berkeley in 1995. She received her M.A. in Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles in 1997 and her Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology with a Developmental Psychology minor at the University of California, Los Angeles in 2001.


    Cost: $168
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
CSU East Bay Grad Fair
CSU Sacramento Grad Fair
Deadline for late registration/full refund/oral defense
Denver AFO- Volunteer at Greater Rockies Food Bank
Difficult Dialogue: Being LGBTQ & Latino
  • Thursday, Oct 23, 2014 from 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

    Benson 21
    6:00 - 8:00 pm

    Focus on self-reflection in a safe space to engage in difficult dialogue as it relates to various aspects of our identities - race, ethnicity, gender, sexual identity, class, etc. Whether or not you self-identify with being LGBTQ & Latino at SCU, you are welcome to join, listen and learn with an open mind and an open heart.

    If you're interested in attending, please RSVP at oml@scu.edu.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
DISTINGUISED SPEAKER SERIES Remembering FDR
  • Saturday, Dec 6, 2014 from 9:30 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here 

    Historians consistently rank Franklin D. Roosevelt as among the most consequential of presidents. His unmatched twelve-year-tenure in the White House changed the terms of life for generations of Americans thereafter, and transformed the international system as well as America’s role in it, in ways that persist well into the twenty-first century. This presentation will explore the sources – personal as well as historical – of Roosevelt’s remarkably deep and durable legacy.

    Speaker  David M. Kennedy is the Donald J. McLachlan Professor of History Emeritus and Director Emeritus of the Bill Lane Center for the American West at Stanford University. For more than four decades he has taught both undergraduate and graduate courses at Stanford in the history of the twentieth-century United States, American political and social thought, American foreign policy, American literature, and the comparative development of democracy in Europe and America. Graduating seniors have four times elected him as Class Day speaker. He has received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching and the Hoagland Prize for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching. In 2008, the Yale University Graduate School presented him with the Wilbur Cross Medal, its highest honor. He has also written about a broad range of subjects in American history. Originally from Seattle, he earned his undergraduate degree from Stanford in 1963 and his PhD from Yale University in 1968.

    Social Gathering:  9:30 AM - 10:00 AM  
    Event:  10:00 AM - 12:00 PM                           

    Event Location:  Fess Parker Studio Theatre 


     

     


    Cost: 25.00
    Location: Mayer Theatre, Fess Parker Studio Theatre
Early Registration for Fall Semester 2015
Early Registration for Intersession 2015 & Spring Semester 2015
East Bay Warriors Game
  • Wednesday, Mar 18, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 10:00 PM

    Come watch as the Warriors take on the Atlanta Hawks, two playoff teams from the year before. We will also be courtside for the pre-game shoot around warm ups.

     

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $20 Per Person
    Location:
         Oracle Arena, 7000 Coliseum Way Oakland, CA 94621
Easter Bunny Brunch
Easter: Library Closed
EDUC x511: When She's Pregnant - The Father's Perspective
  • Saturday, Oct 25, 2014 from 9:00 AM to 12:00 PM

     EDUC x511: When She is Pregnant: The Dad's Perspective

    DATE: Saturday, October 25 *Must register by October 15

    TIME: 9-12PM 

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $50 per person. Special Offer for Couples: $70 per couple. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Although men are excluded from the biological experience of pregnancy, expectant fathers are commonly psychologically just as pregnant as their partners. Currently, men desire and are expected to be increasingly involved during pregnancy, birth, and the early years of child raising. The extra care and attention on the pregnant woman is surely as it should be. Yet, as much as men are encouraged, invited and even cajoled into pregnancy and childbirth, they also receive an unspoken message that their own worries, concerns and thoughts are quite unwelcome. If a couple is to work together most effectively during the pregnancy and early months of their child’s life, it is essential that they both know more fully their partner’s experience.

      The current workshop focuses on the best ways to increase a man’s involvement and for the couple to operate more as a team during pregnancy, childbirth and later parenting. The most common worries, anxieties and concerns that men experience during those precious nine months are described, based on over forty years of research. The workshop concludes with clear practical advice to the couple to help include the new dad more fully and to help expectant fathers find ways to deal with their most natural anxieties (protecting and providing, health and safety etc.)

    Learning Objectives

    At the conclusion of this workshop participants will:

    • Participants will learn about men's “prime directive” – to protect and provide
    • Participants will learn about the pregnancy double-bind for men and how to deal with it
    • Participants will learn about parent team building
    • Participants will learn about the seven most common worries expectant dads face

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Parents
    • Psychologists
    • Psychiatrists
    • Marriage & Family Therapists
    • Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor
    • Physicians
    • Others

    Instructor Bio

    Jerrold Lee Shapiro, Ph.D., ABMP, CGP is a Professor of Counseling Psychology at Santa Clara University (about to begin his 45th year as a full-time college professor). He is also a licensed clinical psychologist. He has worked extensively with several students (including his two children) and families going through the college transition. A veteran of workshops and media appearances (including Oprah, CNN, the CBS News and Morning Shows, PBS, etc.), he regularly speaks to parent groups on a variety of topics involving effective parenting.


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
EDUC x520: Mindful Discipline: A Loving Approach to Setting Limits and Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child
  • Monday, Jan 19, 2015 from 2:00 PM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x520: Mindful Discipline: A Loving Approach to Setting Limits and Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child

    DATE: January 19, 2015 *Must register by December 12

    TIME: 2 p.m.- 4 p.m.

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    WORKSHOP FEE: $65 Individuals, $100 Couples (Book included with fee)

    This course counts as .3 CEUs

    Register for Winter »

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    In this workshop, mindfulness expert Shauna Shapiro weaves together ancient wisdom and modern science to provide new perspectives on parenting and discipline. The workshop is based on her new co-authored book, Mindful Discipline: A Loving approach to Setting Limits and Raising an Emotionally Intelligent Child. Dr. Shapiro redefines discipline and outlines the five essential elements necessary for children to thrive: unconditional love, space for children to be themselves, mentorship, healthy boundaries, and mistakes that create learning and growth opportunities. Parents and educators will also discover practices such as setting limits with love, working with difficult emotions, and forgiveness and compassion meditations that place discipline within a context of mindfulness. This relationship-centered approach will restore your confidence and support your children in developing emotional intelligence, self-discipline and resilience—qualities they need for living an authentic and meaningful life.

     
    COURSE OBJECTIVES
     
    Participants will...
    • Describe the key elements of mindfulness
    • Explain the importance of intention in mindfulness practice
    • Describe specific attitudes of mindfulness.
    • Explain the importance of neuroplasticity for mindfulness practice.
    • Describe the five key elements of Mindful Discipline
    • Explain the importance of self-compassion in parenting

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Parents, Psychologists, Psychiatrists, Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor, Physicians, and Others.

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Shauna Shapiro, PhD, is a professor, clinical psychologist, and internationally recognized expert in mindfulness. With twenty years of meditation experience studying in Thailand and Nepal, as well as in the West, Shapiro brings an embodied sense of mindfulness to her scientific work. She has published over 100 journal articles and chapters, and coauthored the critically acclaimed book, The Art and Science of Mindfulness, as well as her new book, Mindful Discipline: A loving approach to setting limits and raising an emotionally intelligent child. Dr. Shapiro is the recipient of the American Council of Learned Societies teaching award, acknowledging her outstanding contributions to graduate education, as well as a Contemplative Practice fellow of the Mind and Life Institute co-founded by the Dalai Lama. Dr. Shapiro has been invited to lecture for the King of Thailand, the Danish government, and the World Council for Psychotherapy in Beijing, China. Her work has been featured in Wired, USA Today, Oxygen, The Yoga Journal, and the American Psychologist. She lives in Mill Valley, CA with her 9-year-old son, Jackson.

     


    Cost: $65,$100
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers
  • Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 from 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers

    DATE: Saturday, November 8 *Must register by Wednesday, October 29

    TIME: 8AM-5PM

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 135

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement

    Register for fall »

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse; staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 135
EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 to Friday, Oct 31, 2014

    EDUC x601: Health Education for Teachers (Online)

    DATE: October 27 through October 31, 2014 *Must register by October 24

    TIME: Any time that works for you.

    LOCATION: Anywhere you have access to the internet.

    WORKSHOP FEE: $150

    ***This is an asynchronous online course so you may access the course throughout the week at a time that works for you. There is no specific time that you sign in and out. However, we ask that you access the class on the first day of the course to ensure you are aware of what is expected of you for the week. ***

    Meets CTC Preliminary Credential Requirement.

    Register for fall »

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Fulfills Health Education requirement (Standard 10) for SB 2042 Preliminary Credential. This course motivates teachers of all levels and subjects to become active agents of health promotion by taking a holistic view of health, including physical, mental, emotional, and social well-being. Based on the content areas of health instruction in the California Health Framework, topics include alcohol, drug, and tobacco use; nutrition; physical fitness; childhood obesity; HIV/AIDS; stress; peer harassment and school violence prevention; conflict resolution; emotional and behavioral disorders, implication of health and student performance; and legal mandates affecting health and health education in schools. 

     
    Learning Objectives
    • Describe the health status of children and youth, its impact on students' academic achievement and how common behaviors of children and adolescents can foster or comprise their health and safety.
    • Describe common chronic and communicable diseases of children and adolescents, and how to make referrals when these diseases are recognizable at school.
    • Develop effective strategies for encouraging the healthy nutrition of children and youth.
    • Understand and have knowledge of the physiological and sociological effects of alcohol, narcotics, drugs and tobacco; and ways to identify, refer, and support students and their families who may be at risk of physical, psychological, emotional, or social health problems.

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    Students and Graduate Students Seeking Teaching Credentials

    INSTRUCTOR BIO

    Elbina Rafizadeh has an MSN (Masters in Nursing) degree from San Jose State University and her BSN (Bachelors in Nursing) from California State University, Long Beach. She has worked as a home health nurse, staff RN for various hospitals, a public health nurse case manager, and public health nurse consultant. She authored articles for www.myfreece.com. She teaches Health & Lifestyles for California State University, East Bay and Mission College. Elbina has also served on the Healthy Kids Steering Committee and Health Care for All Steering Committee. She is an active member of the American Public Health Association, Diabetes Coalition of California, California Education Associates, California Faculty Association, California Pan-Ethnic Health Network, and East Oakland Building Healthy Communities.


    Cost: 150.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Online
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 4:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Monday, November 17 *Must register by November 5

    Time: 1-4PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    Workshop Fee: $50

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 136
EDUC x603: Adult and Pediatric CPR/AED
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 from 1:00 PM to 5:00 PM

     EDUC x603 – CPR/AED

    Date: Monday, December 5 *Must register by November 26

    Time: 1-5PM

    Location: Loyola Hall, Rm. 136

    Workshop Fee: $50

    Meets CTC preliminary credential requirement. 

    This course is offered in accordance with American Red Cross standards, upon successful completion of this course attendees will receive a digital certificate valid for two years. 

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    This training provides participants with the foundational knowledge to quickly and safely respond in an emergency. An overview is given of the signals of cardiac emergencies, the links of the cardiac chain of survival and the steps for performing CPR. General AED precautions, and special AED situations are addressed. Participants will learn how to recognize the signals of a breathing emergency and how to give care to a person that is choking. This is a hands-on course so participants will practice with manikins, each other, and the AED (trainer machine).

    LEARNING OBJECTIVES

    • Describe how to recognize an emergency
    • Describe how to prioritize care for injuries and sudden illness
    • Describe the purpose of Good Samaritan Laws
    • Identify the difference between (expressed) consent and implied consent
    • Identify how to reduce the risk of disease transmission when giving care
    • Explain how to activate and work with the EMS system
    • Explain when to move an injured or ill person from a dangerous scene
    • Explain how to check a conscious person for life-threatening and non-life-threatening conditions
    • Identify the signals of shock
    • Describe how to minimize the effects of shock
    • Demonstrate how to check an unconscious person for life-threatening conditions
    • Recognize the signals of a cardiac emergency
    • Identify the links in the Cardiac Chain of Survival
    • Describe how to care for a heart attack
    • List the causes of cardiac arrest
    • Explain the role of CPR in cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to perform CPR
    • Explain what defibrillation is
    • Explain how defibrillation works
    • Identify precautions to take when using an AED on a person in sudden cardiac arrest
    • Demonstrate how to use an AED
    • Recognize the signals of a breathing emergency
    • Demonstrate how to care for a person who is choking
    • Apply knowledge and skills learned in course during an emergency scenario

    TARGET AUDIENCE

    • Community Members
    • SCU Employees, students, and alumni

    INSTRUCTOR DESCRIPTION
    Christina Enquist, Ed.D is certified through the American Red Cross


    Cost: $50
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 137
EDUC x606: Advanced Classroom Management - Children as Change Agents (Online Course)
  • Monday, Jun 16, 2014 to Wednesday, Dec 31, 2014

    EDUC x606: Advanced Classroom Management - Children as Change Agents (Online)

    DATE: Since this is an online, asynchronous course, there is NO official start date.  A link to the course will be sent within 72 hours of registration, at which point you will have a minimum of two weeks and a maximum of six months to complete the course. The link will be sent to the email address you provide during registration.

    TIME: At your convenience. 

    LOCATION: Online

    Workshop Fee: $285

    Register Here! 

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    Welcome to Advanced Classroom Management: Children as Change Agents, a course geared primarily for professionals (e.g., regular or special educators, instructional assistants, school psychologist, counselors) serving children and youths presenting behavior problems in the school or community.  This course focuses on cognitive and cognitive-behavioral interventions (often lumped together under the rubric "social skills") with an emphasis on teaching students how to change and manage their own behavior.  Since previous knowledge and understanding of traditional behavioral (operant) concepts and strategies is required, it is strongly recommended that you take an introductory behavior management course to learn the basic terms and concepts of behavior management prior to taking this “advanced” course.
     
    OBJECTIVES

    As a result of this course, participants will demonstrate their ability to:

    • Know the terminology in the areas of behavior management, self-management and cognitive-behavior modification
    • Know the relative merits and limitations of the behavioral and social-cognitive approaches to behavior management
    • Understand the rationale for teaching students how to self-manage their behavior  
    • Understand the roles that cognitions and emotions play in the development of behavior problems
    • Apply the self-management strategies covered in the course to the behavior problems of their own students 
    • Diagnose behavior problems and assess the efficacy of self-management interventions
    • Increase the probability of students using self-management strategies in and outside of the classroom setting 
EDUC x913: Rules for Alphas: The Methodology of Exceptional People Who Make an Impact
  • Saturday, Nov 1, 2014 at 10:00 AM to Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 at 10:00 AM to 5:00 PM

    EDUC x913: Rules for Alphas: The Methodology of Exceptional People Who Make an Impact

    DATE: Saturday, November 1 & Saturday, November 8 *Must register by October 22

    Two-Day Workshop

    TIME: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day

    LOCATION: Loyola Hall, Rm. 160

    Workshop Fee: $336

    This course counts as 1.12 CEU

     

     

     

    WORKSHOP DESCRIPTION

    As we see in the media and our day-to-day lives, the world is rife with examples of successful, but often uninspiring or even infamous, leaders, and entrepreneurs--but what about those extraordinary, impactful individuals who seem to transcend this paradigm--who have wildly successful careers, who are healthy and balanced, who have happy and productive relationships, and who are making a positive difference in the world?
     
    The secret to their success isn't magic--in fact there are specific habits and systems that exceptional people have in common--and, even better, their methodology can be learned. In this workshop, we'll discuss the science behind exceptional people with the aim of applying and sustaining habits and systems in our own lives that will help us to stand out from the crowd and accelerate our personal and professional success. Areas of focus include health and wellness, finances, ethics, relationships, career and achievement, and community impact.
     
    LEARNING OBJECTIVES:
    • Understand the Optimize-Visualize-Strategize model & explain how it can be applied to their lives.
    • Identify one habit/system from the workshop that they have already put into practice in their daily lives.
    • Identify 3 to 5 additional habits/systems from the workshop that they plan to put into practice over the next three to six months.
    • Produce and present (optional) vision boards for their lives & identify their top three goals, including mesures for each goal.
    • Articulate a strategic plan (including timelines, measures, & tracking systems) for how to achieve at least one of their chosen goals.

    Target Audience

    • Young or mid-level professionals who aspire leadership or senior leadership positions 
    • Persons in the midst of a job search or a career change
    • Undergraduate and graduate students near the end of their programs
    • Persons looking for personal enrichment resources
    Instructor Bio

    Danielle Harlan is the Founder of Rules For Alphas. She received her Ph.D. in Political Science and Masters in education from Stanford University, where she was a Jacob K. Javits National Fellow and a Centennial Teaching Award recipient for outstanding teaching. Prior to launching Rules For Alphas, Danielle was the Chief of Operations for the Carnegie Foundation, an organization devoted to harnessing the power of networks and quality improvement strategies in order to solve important educational problems. In addition to teaching in the U.S., she has taught in Brazil, China, Costa Rica, and South Africa. Danielle is a member of the International Leadership Association, the Association for Practical and Professional Ethics, the National Association for Female Executives, and is a certified fitness instructor. 


    Cost: $336
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Rm. 160
Engineering Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Jan 21, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU undergraduate and graduate students in the School of Engineering


    Location: Locatelli Center
ETBA: Levi Stadium VIP Tour
  • Thursday, Nov 13, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Join us as we experience the VIP treatment with a private tour of the 49ers new home. This is the next generation football stadium.  Be the first to go behind the scene of this state of the art venue that was created for the ultimate fan experience.

    Date: Thursday, November 13, 2014 at 10am-noon
     
    Cost: $34 (VIP Tour includes museum)
     
    The Stadium Tour will Feature: 
    SAP Suite Tower, Premium Club Spaces, Field Level, Locker Room, Gold Rush Locker Room & Studio, Press Level, NRG Solar Terrance, 49ers team Store, and 49ers Museum.
     
    The tour is expected to last from 75-90 minutes. The tour is less than 1.5 mile so comfortable walking shoes are recommended for this walking tour.  Photos are allowed on the tour; short videos are allowed (no lights, tripods or monopods on the tour).
     
    Deadline for registration is October 28, 2014
     
    Registration Confirmation:
    When you enroll you will receive an electronic confirmation and a Tour Arrival Information Sheet for Levi’s Stadium.
     
    Parking:
    Parking is free in the Northeast corner of the Great America Lot and the Parking Structure on Tasman Dr. Parking availability is first come first serve and subject to change.
     
    Lunch on your own:
    Tailgating is not permitted in Levi’s Stadium free parking lots during normal tour operating days.
     
    Risk Waiver:  Please sign and return it by mail to Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara CA 95053.  
     
    Conditions:  We are limited to 50 participants.  Registration will be on a first-come, first-serve basis.  You may only register yourself; if you wish to attend with friends or family, each participant will need to register separately and must be an OLLI member, so sign up early.  A waitlist will be established in the event of a sold-out trip.
     
    Cancellations:   No refunds will be given.   If you cannot attend the tour, you must locate a replacement to cover your spot and you must notify the office accordingly. 
     
    Questions:  Frances Lewis-Johnese at ETBASIG@gmail.com will be your contact.    Please refer all questions to Frances.

    Cost: 34.00
Etiquette Dinner for Engineers
  • Monday, Oct 20, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM

    For Junior, Senior, & Graduate students from the School of Engineering - RSVP REQUIRED

    What is etiquette anyway?  People skills, common sense, courtesy, and a powerful self-marketing tool. 

    This will be a special evening of food and entertainment as we explore with certified etiquette consultant, Sharyn Kennedy Amoroso, how to project competence and confidence in professional and dining encounters.

Etiquette Dinner for Undergraduate Juniors & Seniors & ROTC
  • Wednesday, Oct 22, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM

    For undergraduate Juniors & Seniors and ROTC students - RSVP REQUIRED

    What is etiquette anyway?  People skills, common sense, courtesy, and a powerful self-marketing tool. 

    This will be a special evening of food and entertainment as we explore with certified etiquette consultant, Sharyn Kennedy Amoroso, how to project competence and confidence in professional and dining encounters.

FactSet Research Info Session
  • Tuesday, Oct 28, 2014 at 5:30 PM

    Hear from FactSet Research representatives about the company and possible internship and job opportunities.


    Location: Benson Center
         Conference Room 21
Faculty Chamber Music
Fall 2014 Destination Learning Trip
  • Friday, Oct 24, 2014 from 8:15 AM to 4:30 PM

    Wonder what the new Exploratorium has to offer?  

    Join us on an exciting OLLI Destination Learning trip to the San Francisco Exploratorium.
     
    This OLLI Day at the Exploratorium is open to all OLLIs and their members in Northern California.
     
    After  a short coffee time hosted by the SF State OLLI, which will  give us a chance to socialize with OLLI members from all over the area,  there will be a one hour lecture on “Full Spectrum Science” by exhibit developer Ron Hipschman.
     
    Tours and free time to explore on your own as well as a no host lunch at the cafe on site (or bring your own lunch), will fill the afternoon.
     
    Don't miss an opportunity to be part of a memorable day and share this special event.
     
     
    Cost:  $85 (Includes transportation, entry fee, gratuities and parking)

    Parking:  Your trip fee includes a complimentary parking permit good for the entire day at the Leavey Activity Center parking lot. You will receive this permit upon your arrival at the lot. The Leavey Center is Building 702 on the Santa Clara campus; the Leavey Parking Lot can be accessed via Accolti Way (which is at the intersection of El Camino Real, Campbell Ave. and Accolti Way).

    Risk Waiver:  Please sign and return it by mail to Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara CA 95053.   Click here to print waiver.
     
    Conditions:  We are limited to 40 participants.  Registration will be on a first-come, first-serve basis.  You may only register yourself; if you wish to attend with friends or family, each participant will need to register separately and must be an OLLI member, so sign up early.  A waitlist will be established in the event of a sold-out trip. Please send an email to the OLLI office if you wish to be placed on the waitlist: olliatscu@gmail.com.  
     
    Cancellations:  Cancellations must be received 30 days before event date to receive full refund.  After 30 days, you must locate a replacement to cover your spot and you must notify the office accordingly.  Cancellation notice must be made in writing via email to olliatscu@gmail.com.

    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Leavey Center
Fall Semester 2014 Ends
Family Weekend
  • Friday, Feb 20, 2015 to Saturday, Feb 21, 2015

     Santa Clara parents are important members of the SCU community. We thank each family for their support and partnership with all students through their journey here at Santa Clara University.

    We want to extend a special invitation to join us on campus for the 2015 Family Weekend. These events provide you with a great opportunity to learn more about the University and spend some quality time in a fun, social environment with your SCU student.

Feast of Juan Diego
Festival of Lights: Santa Clara University Choirs
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     A festival of lights can have many religious and cultural meanings for people across the world. The Jewish holiday, Hanukkah and the Hindu holiday, Diwali (Tihar), both draw on the imagery of lighting lamps or candles. Culturally, many cities celebrate the change of seasons and the lengthening of days by lighting landmarks in vast and complex displays, and here at Santa Clara University, the Festival of Lights performance has marked the beginning of the holiday season for many for over a decade. The Festival of Lights program draws on many traditions, those formed here and those celebrated across the world, as it explores the changes of the seasons, a variety of holiday traditions, and concludes with a stunning arrangement of Silent Night sung by candle light in the beautiful Santa Clara Mission Church. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Filing deadline for STD, STL, ThM theses/projects & MTS synthesis papers
Film Odyssey: A Method to the Madness - A Brief History of Acting in Film
  • Wednesday, Oct 22, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:30 PM

    Register Here

    Since its birth in 1896, the motion picture industry has used a dizzying array of acting styles and techniques as a part of its unique storytelling process. Please join filmmaker and scholar Mark Larson for a look into the fascinating art of the screen actor. We take some lessons from the master silent actor Monte Blue in director Ernst Lubitsch's The Marriage Circle (1924); learn the steps of musical comedy from Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers in Top Hat (1935); watch Joan Crawford create complex geometric shapes with her shoulders in Mildred Pierce (1945); tap into our inner most “Method” acting with Marlon Brando in On the Waterfront (1954); and learn to work with machines from Steve McQueen in Bullit (1968). A spirited group discussion follows every film. 

    Instructor:
    Mark Larson has been directing works for theatre and film for more than thirty years. His most recent theatre production was Six Psalms, produced for the Mission Santa Clara in May 2013. In the spring of 2012, Mr. Larson began collaborating with photographer Sheeva Sabati to create a series of story and photo broadsides describing life at the intersection of Story Road and King Road in San Jose. These broadsides will be adapted for performance and film in 2014. Mark is one of Osher’s most popular instructors.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates:   September 24 and October 1, 8, 15, 22
    Class Location:  Library Viewing & Taping Room A 

     

     

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         Library Viewing & Taping Room A
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
First Friday Mass and Lunch
French Conversation Table
  • Monday, Oct 20, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows then inside.  (The table with little flags from Francophone countries in its center).

    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, ensuite nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.

    A lundi!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Center Patio
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows then inside.  (The table with little flags from Francophone countries in its center).

    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, ensuite nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.

    A lundi!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Center Patio
  • Monday, Nov 3, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows then inside.  (The table with little flags from Francophone countries in its center).

    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, ensuite nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.

    A lundi!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Center Patio
  • Monday, Nov 10, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows then inside.  (The table with little flags from Francophone countries in its center).

    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, ensuite nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.

    A lundi!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Center Patio
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows then inside.  (The table with little flags from Francophone countries in its center).

    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, ensuite nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.

    A lundi!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Center Patio
  • Monday, Dec 1, 2014 from 11:45 AM to 12:45 PM

    If you want to speak French, join us every Monday from 11:45 till 12:45 on the Benson patio as long as the weather allows then inside.  (The table with little flags from Francophone countries in its center).

    Si vous voulez parler français, joignez-vous à nous chaque lundi de 11h45 à 12h45 sur le patio de Benson tant que le temps nous le permet, ensuite nous nous réunirons à l'intérieur.

    A lundi!


    Cost: Free
    Location: Benson Center
         Benson Center Patio
Freshman/Sophomore Internship Fair
  • Wednesday, Feb 25, 2015 from 5:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU freshmen & sophomores of all majors.


    Location: Locatelli Center
Freshman/Sophomore Resume Drop-In Lab
Freshman/Sophomore Resume Lab
Freshman/Sophomore Resume Lab
Freshman/Sophomore Resume Lab
Freshman/Sophomore Resume Lab
Fusion: Santa Clara University Choirs and Orchestra
  • Friday, Jun 5, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The final concert of the year is a collaboration between the Santa Clara University choirs and orchestras. The evening’s program is eclectic and features selections from Mozart’sVespers.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Gallo Info Session
  • Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014 at 5:30 PM

     Hear from representatives from Gallo about their company and possible job & internship opportunities.

    Seeking all majors


    Location: Benson Center, Williman Room
General Registration for Spring Semester 2015
Gerald McKevitt, S.J. Lecture: Restoration and Relapse: Jesuit Education in the U.S., 1814-1900
  • Tuesday, Dec 2, 2014 at 7:00 PM

    The presentation, entitled "Restoration and Relapse, Jesuit Education in the U.S., 1814-1800," will explore the challenges entailed in the restoration of the Society of Jesus in 1814 and the subsequent success enjoyed by the Jesuits, mostly European immigrants, in establishing colleges across the United States. We will examine the central features of the Jesuit educational network, why it thrived in nineteenth-century America, and the serious challenges posed to that system by American higher education at large in the early twentieth century.

    Professor Gerald McKevitt, S.J. is the author of Brokers of Culture: Italian Jesuits in the American West 1848-1919, published in 2007 by Stanford University Press. He is an expert on Jesuits in the western United States. He has written about Christopher Columbus, Jesuit higher education, 19th century Native Americans, and the history of Santa Clara University. He earned his doctorate from UCLA, his master's from the University of Southern California, a BTS degree from Pontifical Gregorian University, and a bachelor's degree from the University of San Francisco.


    Location: Jesuit School of Theology
         Gesu Chapel
Gettysburg: Three Days That Shaped A Nation
  • Thursday, Nov 13, 2014 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    The course is designed to give participants insights into one of the most famous battles in American history. On July 1st through the 3rd in 1863, over 180,000 troops clashed in what turned out to be the most decisive battle of the American Civil War. On July 4th of that year, when the nation would normally be celebrating the 4th of July, citizens of a prosperous farming community in southern Pennsylvania were dealing with the wide scale carnage (over 50,000 casualties) that disrupted their otherwise peaceful agrarian existence.   

    We will examine the strategic and tactical implications of the battle, and how General Robert E. Lee needed a decisive victory in order to muster the support of European sympathizers such as Great Britain—who depended on the burgeoning cotton industry in the South to drive their own industrial transformation with the textile industry. The narrative (lecture) will be accompanied by period photos (Brady & Sullivan) and original artwork (Troiani), to give participants a sense of the period and the intensity of the battle. The lecture will be all inclusive, starting with the first day’s hostilities along McPherson Ridge to the northwest of Gettysburg; and culminating in the desperation move on the part of General Lee known as Pickett’s Charge, when nearly 15,000 Confederate troops of the Army of Northern Virginia clashed “head on” into the well fortified Union lines along Seminary Ridge—located directly south of the town. We will discuss how serendipitous this battle really was—and how a union victory was not etched in stone. Key accounts of senior officers and generals will also be covered in some detail, as deliberations among the commanders of these two great armies led to decisions that played a major role as to the ultimate outcome of the battle. 

    The course is designed for the novice, armchair historian. Participants may have visited the scene of the battle and be seeking clarity and a better understanding of the participants and the commanders who led them; but this is not essential to enjoying the course. A few readings will be made available, along with a comprehensive reading list for those who would like to delve further and learn more about the battle. 

    Instructor: 

    Bill Cleary received his undergraduate and graduate degree (MS, social science) from the State University of New York, College at Buffalo, where he was recently honored (June of 2013) with the Distinguished Alumni Award. Upon graduation in 1973, Mr. Cleary embarked on a career as a history teacher at Lakeshore High School in Angola, New York. In addition, he completed extended graduate study at the University of Buffalo and Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, where he was Fulbright scholar studying ancient Egyptian history and archeology. Mr. Cleary first visited the battlefield at Gettysburg in 1961 as a young boy, and he was inspired to make it one of his life long passions. Since that first visit, he has returned on at least 20 occasions to further his understanding of what actually transpired on those three memorable days in 1863.
     
    In 1978, Mr. Cleary left his teaching position and began a second career as a marketing professional in New York. He moved to California in 1981, after accepting a position in Apple’s advertising and marketing group. In 1987, Mr. Cleary founded the CKS Group, which filed for a successful IPO in 1995, making it one of the first marketing firms to achieve that distinction in the digital age. Since leaving the company he founded (in 1998), Mr. Cleary has been active with numerous charitable initiatives, including African Wildlife (Dr. Richard Leakey), education and the arts. Mr. Cleary is past Chairman of the Advisory Board for the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.  He has lectured at the SCU business school for the past 20 years, with a specific focus on branding and marketing. Over the past 12 months, Mr. Cleary has been a featured lecturer at SCU, SUNY College at Buffalo, Harvard and Gettysburg College. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 13 & November 20

    Location: Daly Science 207

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Daly Science Center
         Room 207
  • Thursday, Nov 20, 2014 from 2:30 PM to 4:30 PM

    Register Here

    The course is designed to give participants insights into one of the most famous battles in American history. On July 1st through the 3rd in 1863, over 180,000 troops clashed in what turned out to be the most decisive battle of the American Civil War. On July 4th of that year, when the nation would normally be celebrating the 4th of July, citizens of a prosperous farming community in southern Pennsylvania were dealing with the wide scale carnage (over 50,000 casualties) that disrupted their otherwise peaceful agrarian existence.   

    We will examine the strategic and tactical implications of the battle, and how General Robert E. Lee needed a decisive victory in order to muster the support of European sympathizers such as Great Britain—who depended on the burgeoning cotton industry in the South to drive their own industrial transformation with the textile industry. The narrative (lecture) will be accompanied by period photos (Brady & Sullivan) and original artwork (Troiani), to give participants a sense of the period and the intensity of the battle. The lecture will be all inclusive, starting with the first day’s hostilities along McPherson Ridge to the northwest of Gettysburg; and culminating in the desperation move on the part of General Lee known as Pickett’s Charge, when nearly 15,000 Confederate troops of the Army of Northern Virginia clashed “head on” into the well fortified Union lines along Seminary Ridge—located directly south of the town. We will discuss how serendipitous this battle really was—and how a union victory was not etched in stone. Key accounts of senior officers and generals will also be covered in some detail, as deliberations among the commanders of these two great armies led to decisions that played a major role as to the ultimate outcome of the battle. 

    The course is designed for the novice, armchair historian. Participants may have visited the scene of the battle and be seeking clarity and a better understanding of the participants and the commanders who led them; but this is not essential to enjoying the course. A few readings will be made available, along with a comprehensive reading list for those who would like to delve further and learn more about the battle. 

    Instructor: 

    Bill Cleary received his undergraduate and graduate degree (MS, social science) from the State University of New York, College at Buffalo, where he was recently honored (June of 2013) with the Distinguished Alumni Award. Upon graduation in 1973, Mr. Cleary embarked on a career as a history teacher at Lakeshore High School in Angola, New York. In addition, he completed extended graduate study at the University of Buffalo and Ain Shams University in Cairo, Egypt, where he was Fulbright scholar studying ancient Egyptian history and archeology. Mr. Cleary first visited the battlefield at Gettysburg in 1961 as a young boy, and he was inspired to make it one of his life long passions. Since that first visit, he has returned on at least 20 occasions to further his understanding of what actually transpired on those three memorable days in 1863.
     
    In 1978, Mr. Cleary left his teaching position and began a second career as a marketing professional in New York. He moved to California in 1981, after accepting a position in Apple’s advertising and marketing group. In 1987, Mr. Cleary founded the CKS Group, which filed for a successful IPO in 1995, making it one of the first marketing firms to achieve that distinction in the digital age. Since leaving the company he founded (in 1998), Mr. Cleary has been active with numerous charitable initiatives, including African Wildlife (Dr. Richard Leakey), education and the arts. Mr. Cleary is past Chairman of the Advisory Board for the Leavey School of Business at Santa Clara University.  He has lectured at the SCU business school for the past 20 years, with a specific focus on branding and marketing. Over the past 12 months, Mr. Cleary has been a featured lecturer at SCU, SUNY College at Buffalo, Harvard and Gettysburg College. 

    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 13 & November 20

    Location: Daly Science 207

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Daly Science Center
         Room 207
Good Friday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
GTU Administrative Holiday
Guadalupe Celebration
  • Sunday, Dec 7, 2014 at 2:00 PM

    We invite you and your families to the 18th Annual Presentation of "La Virgen del Tepeyac."  This year's presentation will integrate the realities of the border children. All are invited to be a part of the celebration in drama, dance, and song that tells the story of  the apparitions of Our Lady of Guadalupe. The wonderful re-enactment is made possible through the collaboration of Teatro Corazon of Sacred Heart of Jesus Parish and Santa Clara University Students. The performance will be in Spanish with English commentary throughout.

    Event is free and open to the public.

    For more information, contact Dr. Ana Maria Pineda, RSM (408) 554-6958 or Rosa Guerra-Sarabia (408) 554-5011. In compliance with thte ADA/504, direct your accommodation requests to the Mission Church at (408) 554-4203.


    Location: Mission Church
Hawai'i Career Networking Reception
Holiday Dinner
  • Monday, Nov 24, 2014 from 5:30 PM to 8:30 PM

    Register Here 

    Join us for our annual Holiday Dinner.

    Date:  Monday, November 24, 2014 

    Time: 5:30 PM - 8:30 PM
     
    Location: CA Mission Room, Benson Memorial Center
     
    Event:  Dinner and Entertainment
     
    Cost:  $45
      
    Dinner will be preceded by a social gathering. The dinner will take place in the beautiful California Mission Room, located in Benson Memorial Center, and is always a sell-out.

     


    Cost: 45.00
    Location: Benson Center, California Mission Room
         Benson Memorial Center
HUB closes
HUB closure (Thanksgiving Holiday)
Independence Day: Administrative holiday/Library Closed
Indonesian Immersion
Indonesian Immersion
Infinera Info Session
  • Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 at 5:30 PM

     Hear from Infinera representatives about the company and potential job/internship opportunities.  Seeking Engineering majors.  


    Location: Benson Center
         Parlor B
Intersession 2015 Begins
Intersession 2015 Ends
iStart Strong Interpretation Lab
iStart Strong Interpretation Lab
iStart Strong Interpretation Lab
Jazz Band/Combo Concert
  • Tuesday, Jun 2, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Jazz Band and Combo present concerts throughout the academic year. These exciting programs feature music in the American jazz tradition from the bright energy of the Big Band era all the way forward to the jazz music of today. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jazz/Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, Nov 20, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Jazz Band/Combo and Wind Symphony present concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jazz/Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, Mar 12, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Jazz Band/Combo and Wind Symphony present concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Jennifer Kuan : Stanford University
  • Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 1:30 PM

    Please join us for our next management research seminar.  The paper explores the mechanisms of technology adoption in a fascinating political empirical context. Scholars of technology management, innovation, and firm level economics may be particularly interested.

    A light lunch will be served.

    Details:

    SPEAKER:  
    Jennifer Kuan, Academic Advisor in Undergraduate Advising and Research at SIEPR
    Stanford University

    BIO:
    Jennifer Kuan is an economist at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research at Stanford University. She received her PhD from the Haas School of Business at the University of California at Berkeley, where her dissertation on the economic analysis of nonprofit firms won the Strategic Management Society Dissertation Award. In addition to studying nonprofit industries, including performing arts, hospitals, open source software and stock exchanges, she is also part of a U.S. Labor Department study of the American automobile industry. She is the recipient of a Sloan Foundation Industry Studies Fellowship.

    PAPER:
    The Political Economy of Technology Adoption: The Case of Saharan Salt Mining
    (with Seraphima Rombe-Shulman and Ekundayo Shittu)

    ABSTRACT:
    Innovation is an important source of economic growth and competitive advantage. Consequently, a diverse literature in economics and management addresses a variety of questions about how to manage technological change. This paper explores the "opposite" question: What explains the absence of change? We apply existing theories of non-adoption to our case study, salt mining in the Sahara desert, in order to generate new insights into barriers to technology adoption. We find that political organization establishes an environment for the formation of higher-order economic organizations, which in turn affect the direction and rate of technology adoption. Our setting seems exotic, but traditional methods of production persist in myriad impoverished settings including artisanal and small-scale mining (ASM) widespread throughout Africa. The study thus sheds light on the role of institutions in economic growth.

    If you would like to have a one-on-one meeting with Prof. Kuan, please contact Mary Correia.

    We look forward to a lively session of mutual learning!

     

    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 301
John Steinbeck's California: Living in Place
  • Tuesday, Oct 21, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    John Steinbeck, Californian, was intimately connected with the region of his birth. Born in Salinas in 1902, he grew up loving the broad Salinas Valley, “Salad Bowl of the Nation.” On the shores of the nearby Pacific his family had a summer retreat and throughout his life he yearned to be near the sea. The man who knew he would be a writer at age 14 spent a lifetime writing about humans living in place, about the connections between and among human, animals, environment, region. He wrote in the early 1930s: “Each figure is a population and the stones—the trees the muscled mountains are the world—but not the world apart from man—the world and man—the one inseparable unit man and his environment. Why they should ever have been understood as being separate I do not know. Man is said to come out of his environment. He doesn’t knowwhen.” Steinbeck’s vision of place is holistic: human communities and natural communities intersect. In this course we will consider fully the biographical, textual, and social implications of Steinbeck’s ecological holism.

     
    This course will be part lecture—background on Steinbeck’s life and texts—and part discussion of the works. We’ll focus on Steinbeck’s connection to place, both in his short stories and in his magisterial social novel, The Grapes of Wrath, published in 1939.

     

    Recommended Reading/Viewing:
    The Long Valley, Of Mice and Men (film and book), The Grapes of Wrath

     
    Instructor:
    Susan Shillinglaw is a Professor of English at San Jose State University and the SJSU President’s Scholar for 2012 – 13. She is also Scholar–in-Residence at the National Steinbeck Center in Salinas. For eighteen years, Professor Shillinglaw was Director of the Center for Steinbeck Studies at San Jose State University. She has published widely on Steinbeck, most recently Carol and John Steinbeck: Portrait of a Marriage (University of Nevada Press, 2013) and On Reading The Grapes of Wrath (Penguin, 2014), as well as A Journey into Steinbeck’s California (2006; 2011).

    Long Course, Other Dates:  September 23, 30 and October 7, 14, 21

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
JST Admissions Visit: 2014 Call to Action Conference
  • Friday, Nov 7, 2014 to Sunday, Nov 9, 2014

    JST Admissions @ the 2014 Call to Action Conference:

    November 7-9, 2014
    2014 Call To Action Conference
    Exhibit Hall
    Memphis, Tennessee

    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in Memphis!


    Location:
         Exhibit Hall
JST Admissions Visit: 2014 Faith Formation Conference
  • Friday, Nov 21, 2014 to Saturday, Nov 22, 2014

    JST Admissions @ the 2014 Faith Formation Conference:

    November 21-22, 2014
    2014 Faith Formation Conference
    Exhibit Hall
    Santa Clara Convention Center
    Santa Clara, CA
     
    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in Santa Clara!

     


    Location:
         Santa Clara Convention Center
JST Admissions Visit: Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
  • Friday, Mar 13, 2015 to Sunday, Mar 15, 2015

    JST Admissions at the Los Angeles Religious Education Congress:

    March 13-15, 2015
    Los Angeles Religious Education Congress
    Exhibit Hall
    Anaheim Convention Center
    Anaheim, California

    Email or call for an appointment to meet wtih us while we are in Anaheim!


    Location:
         Anaheim Convention Center
JST Admissions Visit: Loyola Marymount University
  • Tuesday, Oct 28, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 2:00 PM

    JST Admissions @ Loyola Marymount University:

    October 28, 2014
    12pm - 2pm
    Loyola Marymount University Graduate School Fair
    Los Angeles, CA

    Email or call for an appointment to meet with us while we are in LA!

     


    Location:
         Loyola Marymount University
JST Baccalaureate Liturgy
JST Commencement Ceremony
Land Grabs, Murder, Women's Rights, Free Speech and More...Historical Legal Cases That Shaped Santa Clara County
  • Wednesday, Oct 22, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    This course will cover some of the most significant courtroom action of Santa Clara County from 1850 to the present time.  Many of these famous cases shaped our community, the state, and in some cases even the nation.  They include historic land grabs, sexual discrimination, pollution, woman's rights, murder, privacy, violence, free speech and massacres. Examples of cases include: US versus Castillero (New Almaden Mine); Pruneyard Shopping Center versus Robins (free speech); Johnson versus Transportation Agency of Santa Clara County (affirmative action); People versus Angela Davis and Rushell Magee (political prisoner); and People versus Richard Allen Davis (Polly Klaas).
     
     
    Instructor: 
    Judge Paul Bernal brings a blend of legal and historic analysis to illuminate significant cases in Santa Clara County. After being a civil practitioner and Deputy District Attorney, he was elevated as a judge to preside over trials in the Superior Court for the last fourteen years.  His history credentials are deep and broad.   He is the Official Historian of the City of San Jose; Chair of the Superior Court Historical Committee; Past President of the Bench and Bar Historical Society; Past President of the California Pioneers of Santa Clara County; Chair of the Historical Heritage Commission of Santa Clara County for a decade; co-founder of the Preservation Action Council of San Jose; and Advisory Board member of History San Jose.   His ancestors also helped found the Bay Area as members of the 1775 Anza Expedition.

    Long Course:  October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Kenna Hall
         Kenna Hall, Room 216
  • Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 4:15 PM

    Register Here

    This course will cover some of the most significant courtroom action of Santa Clara County from 1850 to the present time.  Many of these famous cases shaped our community, the state, and in some cases even the nation.  They include historic land grabs, sexual discrimination, pollution, woman's rights, murder, privacy, violence, free speech and massacres. Examples of cases include: US versus Castillero (New Almaden Mine); Pruneyard Shopping Center versus Robins (free speech); Johnson versus Transportation Agency of Santa Clara County (affirmative action); People versus Angela Davis and Rushell Magee (political prisoner); and People versus Richard Allen Davis (Polly Klaas).
     
     
    Instructor: 
    Judge Paul Bernal brings a blend of legal and historic analysis to illuminate significant cases in Santa Clara County. After being a civil practitioner and Deputy District Attorney, he was elevated as a judge to preside over trials in the Superior Court for the last fourteen years.  His history credentials are deep and broad.   He is the Official Historian of the City of San Jose; Chair of the Superior Court Historical Committee; Past President of the Bench and Bar Historical Society; Past President of the California Pioneers of Santa Clara County; Chair of the Historical Heritage Commission of Santa Clara County for a decade; co-founder of the Preservation Action Council of San Jose; and Advisory Board member of History San Jose.   His ancestors also helped found the Bay Area as members of the 1775 Anza Expedition.

    Long Course:  October 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 

    Location:  Kenna Hall Room 216 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Kenna Hall
         Kenna Hall, Room 216
Late Registration Spring Semester 2015
LinkedIn Drop-In Lab
  • Friday, Oct 24, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    See a demo and get tips for creating a strong LinkedIn profile and networking with alumni, then start working on your profile and ask questions as you go. 


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
  • Friday, Nov 7, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    See a demo and get tips for creating a strong LinkedIn profile and networking with alumni, then start working on your profile and ask questions as you go. 


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
  • Friday, Nov 14, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM

    See a demo and get tips for creating a strong LinkedIn profile and networking with alumni, then start working on your profile and ask questions as you go. 


    Location: Learning Commons and Library
         205
LinkedIn Employer Info Session
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 at 6:00 PM

    Hear from LinkedIn representatives about the company and possible internship and job opportunities.  Seeking Business majors


    Location: Benson Center, Benson Parlors
         B & C
Los Angeles AFO-Tutoring with St. Bernard High School
Los Angeles AFO-Tutoring with St. Bernard High School
Los Angeles President's Club Dinner
  • Thursday, Mar 26, 2015 from 6:00 PM to 9:00 PM

    Michael E. Engh, S.J., President of Santa Clara University cordially invites you to the Los Angeles President’s Club Dinner honoring members of the President’s Club and the 37th Annual Santa Claran of the Year award recipient(s) (still to be named).  


    Location:
         The California Club
Los Angeles SCU vs. LMU Men's Basketball Game & Pregame Reception
Los Angeles- Mass and Lunch with Fr. Engh
  • Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 from 12:30 PM to 3:00 PM

    University President, Michael E. Engh, S.J. returns to his alma mater, St. Bernard High School in Playa del Rey, to celebrate Mass followed by lunch.

    12:30 p.m.   Mass celebrated by Fr. Engh, S.J. at St. Bernard High School

    1:30 p.m.     Reception and Lunch on campus

    RSVP

    $30 per person

    $20 for Young Alumni (2005-2014)


    Cost: $20-$30
Martin Luther King, Jr. Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
MBA / MS Info Sessions
MBA Application Deadline
MBA/MS Spring 2015 Deadline
Memorial Day: Academic and Administrative Holiday
Memory Workshop
  • Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If you think your memory isn't as good as it used to be or would like to learn some tricks on how to improve memory, then this workshop is for you. It's a little known fact that people with very good memory were made, not born. In other words, there are things we can do to improve our memory, no matter if our memory is very good or if we often find ourselves looking around the room wondering why we came in here in the first place. Workshop participants will understand more about why memory fails us and how to avoid those memory failures by learning some easy-to-use memory enhancing techniques.

     
    Instructor
    Dr. Patti Simone is an Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at Santa Clara University, where she teaches a variety of courses related to the relationship between the brain and behavior, including Psychopharmacology, Human Neuropsychology, and Behavioral Neuroscience lab classes. Her research interests are in cognitive aging, and she examines memory and attention abilities in both younger and older adults. Together with Dr. Matt Bell, she runs SCU's Learning and Memory Lab, which annually involves undergraduate research assistants in experimental design, data collection, presentation, and manuscript writing.

    Short Course:  November 11, 18 

    Class Location:  Sobrato Reisdence Hall  B&C (New Location) 


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
  • Tuesday, Nov 18, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    If you think your memory isn't as good as it used to be or would like to learn some tricks on how to improve memory, then this workshop is for you. It's a little known fact that people with very good memory were made, not born. In other words, there are things we can do to improve our memory, no matter if our memory is very good or if we often find ourselves looking around the room wondering why we came in here in the first place. Workshop participants will understand more about why memory fails us and how to avoid those memory failures by learning some easy-to-use memory enhancing techniques.

     
    Instructor
    Dr. Patti Simone is an Associate Professor in the Psychology Department at Santa Clara University, where she teaches a variety of courses related to the relationship between the brain and behavior, including Psychopharmacology, Human Neuropsychology, and Behavioral Neuroscience lab classes. Her research interests are in cognitive aging, and she examines memory and attention abilities in both younger and older adults. Together with Dr. Matt Bell, she runs SCU's Learning and Memory Lab, which annually involves undergraduate research assistants in experimental design, data collection, presentation, and manuscript writing.

    Short Course:  November 11, 18 

    Class Location:  Sobrato Reisdence Hall  B&C (New Location) 


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
Midterm Madness
  • Thursday, Oct 23, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Nov 6, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    With control of the U.S. Senate hanging in the balance, the 2014 midterm elections will determine the fate of the final two years of the Obama Presidency and set the stage for the 2016 presidential elections.  In this course, we'll examine the midterms in exquisite and even unseemly detail.  From Citizens United to the Tea Party, from gerrymandering to primaries and beyond, we’ll explore questions such as:   Why are the Democrats certain to lose?  Why can’t third parties win?  And most importantly, why do we do this to ourselves every four years?  Of course, we’ll also review and analyze the results after the election is over.  If the course is successful, hopefully you’ll be interested enough to join the nearly 1/3 of Americans who will vote in this year’s election.

    Instructor: 

    Dr. James Brent received his PhD from Ohio State University in 1995 and has been teaching in the Department of Political Science at San Jose State University since 1994, where he served as its Chair for six years.  He has published research in venues such as American Politics Research, American Politics Quarterly, and the Justice System Journal.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates: October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6
     
    Location: Loyola Hall Room 160

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
More "Dubliners"
  • Monday, Nov 10, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Araby and The Dead are, justifiably, the two most famous short stories written by the great Irish Modernist, James Joyce. But this course will focus on some of his lesser known, and equally rewarding works of short fiction. We’ll discuss Joyce’s use of narrative technique, epiphanies, and point-of-view; and examine how even in self-imposed exile, he still was held captive by his native Dublin. Stories to be read will include Eveline, Two Gallants, and A Painful Case

    Instructor: James Harvillerecently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory. In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives. Especially Mr. Harville’s. Every time.
     
    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 10, 17

    Location:  Sobrato Hall Room B & C


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Sobrato Hall, Room B and C
  • Monday, Nov 17, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Araby and The Dead are, justifiably, the two most famous short stories written by the great Irish Modernist, James Joyce. But this course will focus on some of his lesser known, and equally rewarding works of short fiction. We’ll discuss Joyce’s use of narrative technique, epiphanies, and point-of-view; and examine how even in self-imposed exile, he still was held captive by his native Dublin. Stories to be read will include Eveline, Two Gallants, and A Painful Case

    Instructor: James Harvillerecently retired after forty-five years of teaching Advanced Placement and Honors English at Bellarmine College Preparatory. In thirty of those years, he taught a senior elective called the “James Joyce Seminar,” in which 12th grade students read A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, some of the stories in Dubliners, and tackled the challenge of Ulysses. It has been said that spending 30 semesters reading Joyce with gifted high school students has changed some lives. Especially Mr. Harville’s. Every time.
     
    Short Course, Other Dates:  November 10, 17

    Location:  Sobrato Hall Room B & C


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Sobrato Residence Hall
         Sobrato Hall, Room B and C
MSE-GI Application Deadline
MSF Application Deadline
MSF Application Deadline Early Decision
NACAC Fair Portland - Portland, OR
NACAC Fair Portland - Portland, OR
NACAC Fair Seattle - Seattle, WA
NACAC Fair Seattle - Seattle, WA
Nancy Wait-Kromm - Soprano Voice
NetApp Networking Night
New Music Ensemble Concert
New Music Festival
  • Wednesday, Jan 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM to Friday, Jan 30, 2015

    The 2015 New Music Festival at Santa Clara University will celebrate the life and work of Alvin Lucier, American composer and pioneer of experimental music and sound installations. The Festival comprises three days of concerts, lectures, and workshops with the presence of the composer himself.

    Lucier has been a pioneer in many areas of music composition and performance, including the notation of performer's physical gestures, the use of brain waves in live performance, and the evocation of room acoustics for musical purposes.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Ogilvy Info Session
Orchestra Concert
  • Saturday, Nov 15, 2014 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Orchestra Concert
  • Saturday, Feb 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Orchestra Concert
  • Friday, Apr 24, 2015 at 7:30 PM

    The Santa Clara University Orchestra presents concerts throughout the academic year. Popular and innovative programming draws from classical orchestral literature as well as contemporary popular and film music. The winter concert features student winners of the Music Department's Concerto/Aria Competition. 


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Mission Church
Palm Springs Mass & Brunch with University President, Michael Engh, S.J.
Presidents' Day Holiday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
PUSD College Fair - San Diego, CA
Rachel Chen : U.C. Davis Graduate School of Management
  • Monday, Oct 27, 2014 from 12:00 PM to 1:15 PM

    Join the Business School for a Chairs Research Seminar Series.

    Speaker: 
    Rachel Chen
    Associate Professor of Management
    Graduate School of Management
    U.C. Davis

    Title: 
    Quality provision with heterogeneous consumer reservation utilities

    Abstract: 
    This paper examines a firm’s quality and price decisions when consumers differ not only in their willingness-to-pay for quality but also in their reservation utility for the basic product. We found that while the firm offers lower-quality products when consumers’ valuations for quality deteriorate, the optimal quality may increase with a negative shift in consumers’ reservation utilities. We also study the product line design of vertically differentiated products. The existing literature shows that when consumers differ only in their willingness-to-pay for quality, the firm sets the efficient quality for consumers with the highest valuation for quality, whereas the concern for cannibalization pushes down the quality of inferior products. We found that when consumers are heterogeneous in both their reservation utility and valuation for quality, the concern for cannibalization may distort the quality upwards, even for consumers with the highest willingness-to-pay for quality. In addition, a low-quality product may enjoy a higher profit margin than a high-quality product within the product line.

    Key words : Quality decision, utility modeling, reservation utility, willingness-to-pay.

    Bio: 
    Rachel Chen is an expert in operations research and supply chain management. Her work has been published in leading journals, including IIE Transactions, Management Science, Marketing Science, Manufacturing & Service Operations Management, Operations Research Letters, and Production and Operations Management. 

    She is an associate editor of Decision Science Journaland IIE Transactions and serves on the editorial reviewer board of Production and Operations Management. She is a former associate editor of the Decision Science Journal.

    Rachel grew up in central China and moved to Shanghai to attend Tongji University and pursue a bachelor’s degree in computer science. Three years later, she obtained her master’s in management information systems from Fudan University. She received her M.S. from Cornell University’s Johnson Graduate School of Management in 2002 and her Ph.D. in operations management a year later. She taught for three years at the management school at UC Riverside before joining the faculty at the UC Davis Graduate School of Management.


    Location: Lucas Hall
         Room 125
Reading Week
Reno/Tahoe Broncos, Dons, and Gaels Dinner
Revel Systems Info Session
  • Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 at 5:30 PM

    Hear from Revel Systems representatives about the company and possible internship and job opportunities.


    Location: Benson Center
         Conference Room 21
Rush Hour Concert - Alex Christie
Rush Hour Concert - Bill Stevens
Rush Hour Concert - Kristen Strom
Rush Hour Concert - SCLOrk
  • Thursday, Jun 4, 2015 at 5:30 PM

     Enjoy 50 minutes of music from our Laptop Orchestra (SCLOrk) and and then breeze through your commute!


    Cost: free
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Russia Beyond the Russians: The Who, Where, and Why of Current Events
  • Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion.

     

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion.

     

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Nov 12, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion.

     

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion.

     

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Wednesday, Dec 3, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion.

     

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 29 and November 5, 12, 19 and December 3

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Russia Beyond the Russians: The Who, Where, and Why of Current Events (Second Session)
  • Friday, Oct 31, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion. 

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21 and December 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Loyola Hall Room 160 (October 31, November 7, December 5)

    Location: Arts & Science Bldg, Weigand Room 102 (November 14, 21)


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Nov 7, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion. 

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21 and December 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Loyola Hall Room 160 (October 31, November 7, December 5)

    Location: Arts & Science Bldg, Weigand Room 102 (November 14, 21)


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Nov 14, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion. 

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21 and December 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Loyola Hall Room 160 (October 31, November 7, December 5)

    Location: Arts & Science Bldg, Weigand Room 102 (November 14, 21)


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Nov 21, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion. 

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21 and December 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Loyola Hall Room 160 (October 31, November 7, December 5)

    Location: Arts & Science Bldg, Weigand Room 102 (November 14, 21)


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Friday, Dec 5, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    This course will focus on recent events in Russia and the post-Soviet region, many aspects of which are a result of enduring ethnic tensions. The Russian Federation alone is home to 180 nationalities, many of which have long been at odds with each other. We shall see that many groups have been significantly diminished by the uniformity-seeking policies of the Russian state, first under the Tsars, then under the Soviets, and most recently under President Vladimir Putin. Many groups still carry the collective memories of the atrocities that were committed against them in the past; and most such groups seek to gain recognition, autonomy, or even full independence. This quest ranges from the peaceful Circassian movement to the much more violent Chechen resistance. To shed light on the current events, we will review the history of Russia and its various ethno-linguistic groups and examine elements of contemporary Russian culture such as music, cinema, cuisine, ethnic jokes, and more. The course will consist of lecture and discussion. 

    Instructor:
    Asya Pereltsvaig received a PhD in Linguistics from McGill University and has taught at Yale, Cornell and Stanford, as well as in several European universities. Her area of specialization is Slavic and Semitic languages; and her general academic interests include languages, history, genetics, and the relationship among the three. Her most recent book, Languages of the World: an Introduction was published by Cambridge University Press in2012. Asya is a popular instructor for SCU’s Osher program.
     

    Long Course, Other Dates: October 31 and November 7, 14, 21 and December 5

    SPLIT ROOMS: Location: Loyola Hall Room 160 (October 31, November 7, December 5)

    Location: Arts & Science Bldg, Weigand Room 102 (November 14, 21)


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
SAIS Fair Tacoma - Tacoma, WA
San Diego SCU vs. USD Men's Basketball Game & Pregame Reception
San Francisco AFO- Serving Meals at St. Anthony's Dining Room
San Ramon Valley Unified School District Fair - San Ramon, CA
Santa Clara Valley AFO- Home Safe Holiday Party
Santa Clara Valley AFO- Read with Washington School
Santa Cruz Annual Fall Luncheon
  • Wednesday, Nov 12, 2014 from 11:30 AM to 2:30 PM



    Don't miss this chance to celebrate a true event tradition - while mingling and enjoying good food with fellow Broncos! This year's speaker will be University Relations Vice President, Jim Lyons.  

    RSVP Online


    Cost: $35 per person
    Location:
         Shadowbrook Restaurant
SIG Genealogy meeting
  • Monday, Oct 20, 2014 at 1:30 PM

    The Genealogy SIG's next meeting will be in the Heritage Pavilion of the Santa Clara City Library.


    Location:
          Heritage Pavilion of the Santa Clara City Library
SIG Travel
  • Monday, Oct 20, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM
    All new and returning Olli members are warmly invited to attend our next Travel Talks SIG meeting on Monday Oct 20 from 1:30PM to 3:00 PM (note: this start time is half an hour later than usual). 
     
    We will be meeting at either the Campbell library or the Saratoga library due to access issues at Loyola 160. (We expect to need to do this through the end of the year but possibly be back on campus early next year.) If anyone has an issue where they can NOT make one of these locations and wants to attend, please let me know ASAP.
     
    The final location choice which will be sent out no later than a few days before the meeting. FYI, the Campbell library is near downtown Campbell and the Saratoga library is near 85 and Saratoga Avenue (good access via 85). 
     
    On October 20th, Magda Gabali will present "Treasures of ancient Egypt". Magda was born in Egypt. She moved here in the 60's and has return to Egypt several times, including a Nile cruise most recently. She can discuss the current situation and questions at the presentation. This should be a very interesting and informative session.
     
    Also, a reminder that all attendees must be current Olli members and sign a release waiver which can be found at  http://www.scu.edu/osher/sig/index.cfm  scrolling towards the bottom. Please return the signed form to Grace Perez at the Olli office.
     

    And, finally, my computer is in the shop for a few days so you will see that this is coming from Linda.Smith@gmail.com. You can still use my usual email linda.c.smith@comcast.net for any questions/comments, etc. 

    Hope to see you there October 20th

     


    Location: Loyola Hall
Skyline College Transfer Day - San Bruno, CA
Slavery in America, 1600-1861
  • Tuesday, Oct 28, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will address slavery in America up to the beginning of the Civil War. It explores the role of slavery in the development of the British American colonies. It will initially situate the English colonization of the Americas in a global perspective. The role of race, religion, science, and sexuality will be explored in the rationale for slavery. Enabling conditions for slave resistance and slave rebellion during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will be examined. An assessment will be made of the ideals of the American Revolution and the conditional effects of abolitionist sentiments.   It will conclude by examining the role of autonomous maroon communities of escaped slaves and their relationship with existing slaves and plantation owners.

      

    Instructor:
    Dr. Ruma Chopra is Associate Professor at San Jose State University where she has been a member of the History Department since the fall of 2008. She earned her undergraduate degree at Carnegie Mellon University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis. Her teaching and research focus has been on Colonial America. In addition to her teaching assignments, this has resulted in two books - Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution and Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America. Both of these publications explore allegiance to the Crown of England in British North America during the eighteenth century. She has also focused on the many facets of the colonial society, including the role and significance of slavery. 
    .

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Nov 4, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will address slavery in America up to the beginning of the Civil War. It explores the role of slavery in the development of the British American colonies. It will initially situate the English colonization of the Americas in a global perspective. The role of race, religion, science, and sexuality will be explored in the rationale for slavery. Enabling conditions for slave resistance and slave rebellion during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will be examined. An assessment will be made of the ideals of the American Revolution and the conditional effects of abolitionist sentiments.   It will conclude by examining the role of autonomous maroon communities of escaped slaves and their relationship with existing slaves and plantation owners.

      

    Instructor:
    Dr. Ruma Chopra is Associate Professor at San Jose State University where she has been a member of the History Department since the fall of 2008. She earned her undergraduate degree at Carnegie Mellon University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis. Her teaching and research focus has been on Colonial America. In addition to her teaching assignments, this has resulted in two books - Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution and Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America. Both of these publications explore allegiance to the Crown of England in British North America during the eighteenth century. She has also focused on the many facets of the colonial society, including the role and significance of slavery. 
    .

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Nov 11, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will address slavery in America up to the beginning of the Civil War. It explores the role of slavery in the development of the British American colonies. It will initially situate the English colonization of the Americas in a global perspective. The role of race, religion, science, and sexuality will be explored in the rationale for slavery. Enabling conditions for slave resistance and slave rebellion during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will be examined. An assessment will be made of the ideals of the American Revolution and the conditional effects of abolitionist sentiments.   It will conclude by examining the role of autonomous maroon communities of escaped slaves and their relationship with existing slaves and plantation owners.

      

    Instructor:
    Dr. Ruma Chopra is Associate Professor at San Jose State University where she has been a member of the History Department since the fall of 2008. She earned her undergraduate degree at Carnegie Mellon University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis. Her teaching and research focus has been on Colonial America. In addition to her teaching assignments, this has resulted in two books - Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution and Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America. Both of these publications explore allegiance to the Crown of England in British North America during the eighteenth century. She has also focused on the many facets of the colonial society, including the role and significance of slavery. 
    .

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Nov 18, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will address slavery in America up to the beginning of the Civil War. It explores the role of slavery in the development of the British American colonies. It will initially situate the English colonization of the Americas in a global perspective. The role of race, religion, science, and sexuality will be explored in the rationale for slavery. Enabling conditions for slave resistance and slave rebellion during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will be examined. An assessment will be made of the ideals of the American Revolution and the conditional effects of abolitionist sentiments.   It will conclude by examining the role of autonomous maroon communities of escaped slaves and their relationship with existing slaves and plantation owners.

      

    Instructor:
    Dr. Ruma Chopra is Associate Professor at San Jose State University where she has been a member of the History Department since the fall of 2008. She earned her undergraduate degree at Carnegie Mellon University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis. Her teaching and research focus has been on Colonial America. In addition to her teaching assignments, this has resulted in two books - Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution and Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America. Both of these publications explore allegiance to the Crown of England in British North America during the eighteenth century. She has also focused on the many facets of the colonial society, including the role and significance of slavery. 
    .

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Tuesday, Dec 2, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 12:00 PM

    Register Here

    This course will address slavery in America up to the beginning of the Civil War. It explores the role of slavery in the development of the British American colonies. It will initially situate the English colonization of the Americas in a global perspective. The role of race, religion, science, and sexuality will be explored in the rationale for slavery. Enabling conditions for slave resistance and slave rebellion during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries will be examined. An assessment will be made of the ideals of the American Revolution and the conditional effects of abolitionist sentiments.   It will conclude by examining the role of autonomous maroon communities of escaped slaves and their relationship with existing slaves and plantation owners.

      

    Instructor:
    Dr. Ruma Chopra is Associate Professor at San Jose State University where she has been a member of the History Department since the fall of 2008. She earned her undergraduate degree at Carnegie Mellon University and her PhD at the University of California, Davis. Her teaching and research focus has been on Colonial America. In addition to her teaching assignments, this has resulted in two books - Unnatural Rebellion: Loyalists in New York City during the Revolution and Choosing Sides: Loyalists in Revolutionary America. Both of these publications explore allegiance to the Crown of England in British North America during the eighteenth century. She has also focused on the many facets of the colonial society, including the role and significance of slavery. 
    .

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 28 and November 4, 11, 18 and December 2

    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
Spring 2015 Recess
Spring Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Apr 8, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni


    Location: Locatelli Center
Spring Semester 2015 Begins
Spring Semester 2015 Ends
Stanford Grad Schools Fair
Start Up Expo
  • Wednesday, Mar 4, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni


    Location: Locatelli Center
Study Abroad 101
Study Abroad 101
Study Abroad 101
Study Abroad 101
Sunday Morning Liturgy
Tavola Italiana - Italian Conversation
  • Wednesday, Oct 22, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM

    Tavola Italiana is back for the 2014 Fall quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

    Tavola Italiana will meet every Wednesday 2:15pm to 3:15pm in Casa Italiana starting on October 1st. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Casa, outdoor space in front of CASA
  • Wednesday, Oct 29, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM

    Tavola Italiana is back for the 2014 Fall quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

    Tavola Italiana will meet every Wednesday 2:15pm to 3:15pm in Casa Italiana starting on October 1st. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Casa, outdoor space in front of CASA
  • Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM

    Tavola Italiana is back for the 2014 Fall quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

    Tavola Italiana will meet every Wednesday 2:15pm to 3:15pm in Casa Italiana starting on October 1st. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Casa, outdoor space in front of CASA
  • Wednesday, Nov 12, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM

    Tavola Italiana is back for the 2014 Fall quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

    Tavola Italiana will meet every Wednesday 2:15pm to 3:15pm in Casa Italiana starting on October 1st. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Casa, outdoor space in front of CASA
  • Wednesday, Nov 19, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM

    Tavola Italiana is back for the 2014 Fall quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

    Tavola Italiana will meet every Wednesday 2:15pm to 3:15pm in Casa Italiana starting on October 1st. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Casa, outdoor space in front of CASA
  • Wednesday, Dec 3, 2014 from 2:15 PM to 3:15 PM

    Tavola Italiana is back for the 2014 Fall quarter. We are an informal group that meets on campus to speak Italian. All levels of Italian are welcome (our former and current students are encouraged to attend). Just bring your enthusiasm and desire to practice the bella lingua!

    Tavola Italiana will meet every Wednesday 2:15pm to 3:15pm in Casa Italiana starting on October 1st. We'll meet in the outdoor space in front of Casa (right side of main entrance) weather permitting. If not, you'll find us inside.


    Cost: Free
    Location: Casa Italiana Residence Hall
         Casa, outdoor space in front of CASA
Teresa McCollough - Piano
Thanksgiving Holiday: Academic and Administrative Holiday
The Armchair Traveler Visits the 3 Top French Destinations: Paris, Provence, and the Cote d' Azur
  • Wednesday, Nov 5, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Join History Professor Emerita Dorothea French, and videographer Wes French as they explore three of the most popular destinations in France. You’ll be transported to the sophisticated and glamorous Côte d’Azur with its local festivals, sun-drenched beaches, chateaux, museums, San Tropez, Monaco, and of course the International Cannes Film Festival! While in Provence visit impressive Roman antiquities, quiet “perched” villages, and walk in the footsteps of Van Gogh. Finally—there’s no place like PARIS--one of the most beautiful and exciting cities in the world! Accompany Dorothea and Wes as they learn French cooking at L’atelier des Chefs, and find hidden gems such as the Branly Museum and the Cité de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine. Attend the races at Longchamp in the Bois de Boulogne before having lunch at the charming Chalet des Isles. There is so much to see and do in France you’ll want to return again and again. 

    Instructor: 
    Dr. Dorothea French received an MA in Ancient History at San Jose State University, and a Ph.D. in Medieval History at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor French taught ancient and medieval history at Santa Clara University, where she received the Dave Logothetti Award for her “energetic, engaging, and effective teaching skills.” She and her husband Wes are active members of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Santa Clara University, where they introduced the popular “Armchair Traveler” series featuring their travelogues.


    Short Course, Other Dates;  November 5, 12
    Location: The Villages at the Vineyard Center

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160, The villages are located at 5000 Cribari Lane, San Jose, CA 95135
  • Wednesday, Nov 12, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Join History Professor Emerita Dorothea French, and videographer Wes French as they explore three of the most popular destinations in France. You’ll be transported to the sophisticated and glamorous Côte d’Azur with its local festivals, sun-drenched beaches, chateaux, museums, San Tropez, Monaco, and of course the International Cannes Film Festival! While in Provence visit impressive Roman antiquities, quiet “perched” villages, and walk in the footsteps of Van Gogh. Finally—there’s no place like PARIS--one of the most beautiful and exciting cities in the world! Accompany Dorothea and Wes as they learn French cooking at L’atelier des Chefs, and find hidden gems such as the Branly Museum and the Cité de l’Architecture et du Patrimoine. Attend the races at Longchamp in the Bois de Boulogne before having lunch at the charming Chalet des Isles. There is so much to see and do in France you’ll want to return again and again. 

    Instructor: 
    Dr. Dorothea French received an MA in Ancient History at San Jose State University, and a Ph.D. in Medieval History at the University of California, Berkeley. Professor French taught ancient and medieval history at Santa Clara University, where she received the Dave Logothetti Award for her “energetic, engaging, and effective teaching skills.” She and her husband Wes are active members of the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Santa Clara University, where they introduced the popular “Armchair Traveler” series featuring their travelogues.


    Short Course, Other Dates;  November 5, 12
    Location: The Villages at the Vineyard Center

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160, The villages are located at 5000 Cribari Lane, San Jose, CA 95135
The Impact of Photography in the 20th Century
  • Thursday, Oct 23, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Photography has long had a powerful impact on society and one's daily life. This course will deal with photography as a weapon for social change and the role and importance of photojournalism.   It will include what is called the “F/64 Movement” that will provide an in-depth session on Edward Weston, Ansel Adams and Imogen Cunningham, with an emphasis on California photo history. The course will conclude with sessions on photography in the 1950s and 1960s.

    Instructor: 

    Brian Taylor is Professor of Art and Art History in the photography program at San Jose State University, where he has taught for over 30 years. He received his B.A. Degree in Visual Arts from the University of California at San Diego, an M.A. from Stanford University, and his M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico.  Heis known for his innovative explorations of alternative photographic processes, including historic 19th Century printing techniques and mixed media. His work has been exhibited nationally and abroad in numerous solo and group shows and is included in the permanent collections of the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6   

    Split Rooms:   Library Viewing and Taping Room:  October 9, October 23, November 6 
                              Loyola Hall Room 160:  October 16, October 30 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Oct 30, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Photography has long had a powerful impact on society and one's daily life. This course will deal with photography as a weapon for social change and the role and importance of photojournalism.   It will include what is called the “F/64 Movement” that will provide an in-depth session on Edward Weston, Ansel Adams and Imogen Cunningham, with an emphasis on California photo history. The course will conclude with sessions on photography in the 1950s and 1960s.

    Instructor: 

    Brian Taylor is Professor of Art and Art History in the photography program at San Jose State University, where he has taught for over 30 years. He received his B.A. Degree in Visual Arts from the University of California at San Diego, an M.A. from Stanford University, and his M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico.  Heis known for his innovative explorations of alternative photographic processes, including historic 19th Century printing techniques and mixed media. His work has been exhibited nationally and abroad in numerous solo and group shows and is included in the permanent collections of the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6   

    Split Rooms:   Library Viewing and Taping Room:  October 9, October 23, November 6 
                              Loyola Hall Room 160:  October 16, October 30 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
  • Thursday, Nov 6, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Photography has long had a powerful impact on society and one's daily life. This course will deal with photography as a weapon for social change and the role and importance of photojournalism.   It will include what is called the “F/64 Movement” that will provide an in-depth session on Edward Weston, Ansel Adams and Imogen Cunningham, with an emphasis on California photo history. The course will conclude with sessions on photography in the 1950s and 1960s.

    Instructor: 

    Brian Taylor is Professor of Art and Art History in the photography program at San Jose State University, where he has taught for over 30 years. He received his B.A. Degree in Visual Arts from the University of California at San Diego, an M.A. from Stanford University, and his M.F.A. from the University of New Mexico.  Heis known for his innovative explorations of alternative photographic processes, including historic 19th Century printing techniques and mixed media. His work has been exhibited nationally and abroad in numerous solo and group shows and is included in the permanent collections of the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; the Los Angeles County Museum of Art; and the International Museum of Photography at the George Eastman House, Rochester, NY.

    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 9, 16, 23, 30 and November 6   

    Split Rooms:   Library Viewing and Taping Room:  October 9, October 23, November 6 
                              Loyola Hall Room 160:  October 16, October 30 

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
The Roadmap to 100: The Science of Living a Long Life
  • Friday, Oct 24, 2014 from 9:30 AM to 11:30 AM

    Register Here

    A bonanza of life lessons emerges from new knowledge about what aging is all about. Until now, virtually everything we had thought about aging has been wrong. Just as the insights into the world of DNA revealed the hidden nature of life’s beginnings, so too does the science of growing older change our understanding of the full map of human life.   In this course, you will learn what aging is and is not. You will learn the basic science of aging, its pace, its space, its span, its dynamics, its true timeline, its telomeres, and much more. You will learn about the impact of nutrition, attitude, and exercise on the basic processes of aging; ways to avoid heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, and cognitive decline; and how to use (and not use) the medical system. And, quite importantly, we will focus on how to find meaning in older age and preserve your intellect, creativity, sexuality, and sense of flow, while also contemplating how to die, and how not to die. Since we have options when it comes to the path our lives take, the choices we make must be well informed. 

    Instructor: 

    Walter M. Bortz, Adjunct Clinical Professor, Emeritus, Stanford School of Medicine, has been a practicing physician at the Palo Alto Medical Clinic and Stanford Hospital, and has participated in and led many civic ventures, including the Palo Alto Council Task Force on Aging. He also co-founded the Experience Corps with John Gardner. Bortz has been President of the American Geriatrics Society and Co-Chair of the American Medical Association-American Nurses Association Task Force on Aging. He has written seven books, two on diabetes and four on aging, including We Live Too Short and Die Too Long, Dare to be 100, Growing Older for Dummies and Roadmap to 100. His latest book, Next Medicine: The Science and Civics of Health, examines multiple flaws of our medical system.
     
    Long Course, Other Dates:  September 26 and October 3, 10, 17, 24

    SPLIT ROOMS:
    Location:  Loyola Hall Room 160 (September 26 and October 3, 17, 24)
    Location:  Bannan Hall Room 241 (October 10)

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Loyola Hall
         Room 160
The War to End All Wars
  • Saturday, Oct 25, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I.  Before it ended in 1918, more than 65 million men from 20 nations were counted as combatants, and an astonishing 57% of them were killed or wounded.  Horrific new weapons, such as poison gas, flamethrowers, and serial bombardment, were used against essentially defenseless troops.  Although the war cost an estimated $200 billion, impoverishing large segments of many countries, its causes never have been made clear.  Reflexive, ingrown militarism needed an outlet, and nothing emerged to stop the slaughter until populations and resources were exhausted.
     
    Instructor: 
    Larry Bensky, former national affairs correspondent for KPFA/Pacifica Radio, has taught “The American Presidency” and other government and politics courses at California State University, East Bay.  He is a popular and frequent instructor at Berkeley OLLI.  His interest in WWI has deepened through seven years of recent study of Marcel Proust and France in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  This will be his first SCU Osher course.

    Long Course:  October 25 and November 1, 8  
    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Weigand Room 102  

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
  • Saturday, Nov 1, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I.  Before it ended in 1918, more than 65 million men from 20 nations were counted as combatants, and an astonishing 57% of them were killed or wounded.  Horrific new weapons, such as poison gas, flamethrowers, and serial bombardment, were used against essentially defenseless troops.  Although the war cost an estimated $200 billion, impoverishing large segments of many countries, its causes never have been made clear.  Reflexive, ingrown militarism needed an outlet, and nothing emerged to stop the slaughter until populations and resources were exhausted.
     
    Instructor: 
    Larry Bensky, former national affairs correspondent for KPFA/Pacifica Radio, has taught “The American Presidency” and other government and politics courses at California State University, East Bay.  He is a popular and frequent instructor at Berkeley OLLI.  His interest in WWI has deepened through seven years of recent study of Marcel Proust and France in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  This will be his first SCU Osher course.

    Long Course:  October 25 and November 1, 8  
    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Weigand Room 102  

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
  • Saturday, Nov 8, 2014 from 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM

    Register Here

    This year marks the 100th anniversary of the beginning of World War I.  Before it ended in 1918, more than 65 million men from 20 nations were counted as combatants, and an astonishing 57% of them were killed or wounded.  Horrific new weapons, such as poison gas, flamethrowers, and serial bombardment, were used against essentially defenseless troops.  Although the war cost an estimated $200 billion, impoverishing large segments of many countries, its causes never have been made clear.  Reflexive, ingrown militarism needed an outlet, and nothing emerged to stop the slaughter until populations and resources were exhausted.
     
    Instructor: 
    Larry Bensky, former national affairs correspondent for KPFA/Pacifica Radio, has taught “The American Presidency” and other government and politics courses at California State University, East Bay.  He is a popular and frequent instructor at Berkeley OLLI.  His interest in WWI has deepened through seven years of recent study of Marcel Proust and France in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  This will be his first SCU Osher course.

    Long Course:  October 25 and November 1, 8  
    Location:  Arts & Science Building, Weigand Room 102  

     


    Cost: 85.00
    Location: Vari Hall, The Wiegand Center
         Arts and Science Building, Wiegand room 102
Theatre Behind the Scenes: Working
  • Tuesday, Nov 4, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Working is a musical by Stephen Schwartz (composer of Wicked and Godspell) and is based on the Studs Terkel book from 1974, in which he interviewed real people about their working lives. It poignantly explores how and why people do what they do every day. Premiering in Chicago in 1977, Working moved to Broadway the next year and has been a staple of musical theatre ever since. Through songs and scenes, the personal stories of twenty-five characters come to life, from teacher to ironworker to waitress. Led by the director of the SCU production, this class will discuss the origins of the story, and the many dynamic characters and situations in the musical, as well as its relevance to Silicon Valley today. While reverencing landmark productions of the show, it will focus primarily on the SCU production, taking you behind the scenes to understand all that goes into producing a major musical. The director will also lead a post-show discussion.

    Instructor: 

    Jeffrey Bracco is an actor, director, playwright and theatre teacher with a twenty-year professional career in the United States and Europe. Jeffrey has been at the helm of numerous professional productions, including his own play, ShakesPod, at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2008. Locally, at City Lights Theater Company, Jeffrey directed a sold-out run of The Santaland Diaries, acclaimed versions of Spamalot and The Three Musketeers, as well as the musical NINE, for which he was nominated as Best Director by the Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle.
     
    As an actor, Jeffrey appeared in the film From Paris With Love with John Travolta and Jonathan Rhys Meyers, as well as the French TV series, Hard. He has also appeared as a leading actor in the first two seasons of the San Antonio Shakespeare Festival—as well as at other regional theatres in the U.S. He recently played the lead role in The Language Archive at City Lights.
     
    Jeffrey has written several plays that have been produced professionally, including ShakesPod, POE-Pourri and Twainheart. In 2011, his newest play, The Futurists!, won the 21st Annual New Works Festival at the Long Beach Playhouse. His latest play, a collaboration with Kit Wilder, will open in November at City Lights and is called Truce: A Christmas Wish From The Great War.
     
    Throughout his academic career, Jeffrey has taught Directing, Dramaturgy, Acting, Theatre History and Voice and Movement courses at the university level in the U.S. and France. He earned his MFA at the University of Texas, Austin, and his BA from Santa Clara University, where he was valedictorian of his class. Jeffrey is happy to be teaching at his alma mater.
     
    Class Session: Tuesday, November 4 from 2PM - 4PM 
    Location:  Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
     
    Performance: Sunday, November 9 Start time 2PM
    Location:  Louis B. Mayer Theatre
    The performance will be followed by a post-production discussion.
    (You will get your ticket at class session, Nov 4)

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Music and Dance Facility
         Recital Hall
  • Sunday, Nov 9, 2014 from 2:00 PM to 4:00 PM

    Register Here

    Working is a musical by Stephen Schwartz (composer of Wicked and Godspell) and is based on the Studs Terkel book from 1974, in which he interviewed real people about their working lives. It poignantly explores how and why people do what they do every day. Premiering in Chicago in 1977, Working moved to Broadway the next year and has been a staple of musical theatre ever since. Through songs and scenes, the personal stories of twenty-five characters come to life, from teacher to ironworker to waitress. Led by the director of the SCU production, this class will discuss the origins of the story, and the many dynamic characters and situations in the musical, as well as its relevance to Silicon Valley today. While reverencing landmark productions of the show, it will focus primarily on the SCU production, taking you behind the scenes to understand all that goes into producing a major musical. The director will also lead a post-show discussion.

    Instructor: 

    Jeffrey Bracco is an actor, director, playwright and theatre teacher with a twenty-year professional career in the United States and Europe. Jeffrey has been at the helm of numerous professional productions, including his own play, ShakesPod, at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival in 2008. Locally, at City Lights Theater Company, Jeffrey directed a sold-out run of The Santaland Diaries, acclaimed versions of Spamalot and The Three Musketeers, as well as the musical NINE, for which he was nominated as Best Director by the Bay Area Theatre Critics Circle.
     
    As an actor, Jeffrey appeared in the film From Paris With Love with John Travolta and Jonathan Rhys Meyers, as well as the French TV series, Hard. He has also appeared as a leading actor in the first two seasons of the San Antonio Shakespeare Festival—as well as at other regional theatres in the U.S. He recently played the lead role in The Language Archive at City Lights.
     
    Jeffrey has written several plays that have been produced professionally, including ShakesPod, POE-Pourri and Twainheart. In 2011, his newest play, The Futurists!, won the 21st Annual New Works Festival at the Long Beach Playhouse. His latest play, a collaboration with Kit Wilder, will open in November at City Lights and is called Truce: A Christmas Wish From The Great War.
     
    Throughout his academic career, Jeffrey has taught Directing, Dramaturgy, Acting, Theatre History and Voice and Movement courses at the university level in the U.S. and France. He earned his MFA at the University of Texas, Austin, and his BA from Santa Clara University, where he was valedictorian of his class. Jeffrey is happy to be teaching at his alma mater.
     
    Class Session: Tuesday, November 4 from 2PM - 4PM 
    Location:  Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
     
    Performance: Sunday, November 9 Start time 2PM
    Location:  Louis B. Mayer Theatre
    The performance will be followed by a post-production discussion.
    (You will get your ticket at class session, Nov 4)

     


    Cost: 40.00
    Location: Music and Dance Facility
         Recital Hall
UC Davis Grad Fair
UC Santa Cruz Grad Fair
UCLA Grad Fair
USC Grad Fair
WACAC College Fair Reno - Reno, NV
Watercolor Workshop (Studio Course)
  • Friday, Oct 24, 2014 from 1:30 PM to 3:30 PM

    Register Here

    Due to its studio nature, this course will be limited to 15 participants
     
    This 3- session studio workshop will provide an overview of watercolor technique, and the opportunity to explore still-life, botanical, and plein air sketching in SCU’s Mission Gardens. Students with various levels of experience with watercolor, including beginners, are encouraged to enroll. This is SCU Osher’s first-ever studio course, and is offered in special partnership with the studio art program of the Department of Art and Art History.

    All materials and supplies will be provided by the Department of Art and Art History. Sessions 1 and 2 will be held indoors in Art Department studio space. This space has moderately comfortable basic metal stools (no backs, no seat padding) and drawing tables. Session 3 will be (weather permitting) out- of- doors; and some walking will be required. Small portable stools will be made available to enrollees for this plein air session. Students will need to carry the stool and a bag of supplies, while walking from the studio to the Mission area.  Prospective students who have balance issues; cannot walk well; or cannot sit and stand up easily from a small folding stool may have difficulty with the outdoor session of the course. 

    Instructor:   Ryan Reynolds is an accomplished artist working in a variety of media. An Assistant Professor in SCU’s Department of Art and Art History, he currently teaches basic drawing, life drawing and advanced drawing. Ryan’s work has been included in numerous solo and group exhibitions, and his work has received many awards. Ryan received his M.F.A in Art Practice from the University of California at Berkeley. This is Ryan’s first course for SCU Osher.

     
    Long Course, Other Dates:  October 10, 17, 24 
    Location: Art Department, Studio 

     


    Cost: 50.00
    Location: Fine Arts Building
         Art Department Building, Studio Space C
Wind Symphony Concert
  • Thursday, May 28, 2015 at 7:30 PM

     The Santa Clara University Wind Symphony presents concerts throughout the academic year, showcasing the broad scope of wind music, from the marches of John Phillip Sousa to the latest contemporary works for band.


    Cost: 5/10/15
    Location: Music and Dance Facility, Recital Hall
Winter Career Fair
  • Wednesday, Jan 14, 2015 from 4:00 PM to 7:00 PM

    Meet with employers, apply for jobs and internships, explore careers, obtain employer information, and establish contacts.  For SCU students of all years and majors and SCU Alumni.


    Location: Locatelli Center
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