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Survey of Recent Graduates

Approximately six months after their graduation dates, Santa Clara University surveyed the class of 2016. The survey tracks early outcomes and satisfaction among SCU graduates. See highlights of the study below.

 

Table of Contents

Post-Graduation Status Post-Graduation Employment Status Annual Base Salaries by School or College Graduate Satisfaction

Post-Graduation Status

 

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83%

of graduates are employed full-time, attending graduate school or participating in a service program.

70% were employed full-time.

10% were attending graduate school full-time.

3% were participating full-time in a service program.

Post-Graduation Employment Status

 

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86%
of grads looking for work obtain full-time jobs.

Full-time employment of job-seeking graduates by field of study:

Engineering: 80%

Business: 93%

Math or natural sciences: 78%

Social sciences: 90%

Humanities or fine arts: 78%

Annual Base Salaries by School or College

 

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53k
median starting salary for the graduate working full-time

Median starting salary for full-time worker by field of study:

Engineering: $70,500

Business: $60,500

Math or natural sciences: $38,000

Social sciences: $45,500

Humanities or fine arts: $45,500

Graduate Satisfaction

  

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85%

of all graduates indicated that SCU had provided good to excellent preparation for life after college.

92% of grad school students indicated that SCU provided good to excellent preparation for graduate study.

80% of full-time workers indicated that SCU provided good to excellent preparation for their careers.

Methodology and Statistical Significance of the Study

 

These data were collected from graduates who began as first-time freshmen in 2012 and graduated within four years. The survey instrument was emailed to all 2016 graduates for whom we had valid e-mail addresses (97%). The response rate of 40% yields a profile that is representative of the class of 2016 by school/college, academic cluster, sex, and ethnicity/race.

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