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1954

'54
William F. Caro

William F. Caro '54, J.D. '73. Feb. 26, 2014. Born in San Jose in 1932, Caro inherited his father's devotion to SCU's fabled football history and loved to recount, play-by-play, Santa Clara's heartbreaking 7-6 loss to Stanford in the very first college game he ever attended, as an eight-year-old, on Oct. 12, 1940. Athletic loyalties notwithstandng, he did graduate work at Stanford, earning his M.B.A. in 1960 with an emphasis in marketing. His subsequent career as an advertising media director brought him to agencies in San Francisco and Los Angees and Eventually to Coakley-Heagerty in Santa Clara. He later taught advertising at San Jose State University. Caro spent his retirement years in Santa Clara, not far from where the palm and olive mingle. He occasionally enjoyed an idle hour in the university library researching the glory days of Bronco football. He is survived by his brothers, Robert, S.J. '58, M.Div '70 and Paul '62.

submitted Mar. 25, 2014 10:43P
'54
Ted Connolly

Theodore "Ted" William Connolly '54, former All-Pro San Francisco 49er right guard, peacefully passed in his Gardnerville, Nev., home, on Feb. 24, 2014 from acute mylocytic leukemia. He was 82.

Ted was born the youngest of five children on December 5, 1931 in Oakland, Calif. to parents William Eugene Connolly and Dora Ray Waterman. He attended Piedmont High School 1946-49 where he was All-Alameda County for 3 years in football and track, and lettered in baseball and basketball, hence was inducted into the Piedmont HS Sports Hall of Fame. He attended University of Santa Clara where he was All-Catholic All American tackle in 1951. When Santa Clara dropped football he transferred to Tulsa University, Okla., and graduated in 1953. Ted married his high school sweetheart, Mary Elizabeth Heidt, on April 19, 1954, in Tulsa, Okla., and had five children which they raised in Oakland, Calif. 

Ted achieved his childhood dream and was drafted in the 9th round in 1953 by his home town team - the San Francisco 49ers. He played for the Forty Niners until 1962 - his NFL All-Pro year. After holding out from signing his 1963 49er contact and being fined $100 per day, he showed up to his contact negotiations with his lawyer, Ray Bolton – an unheard of scandalous move for a professional athlete at that time. He was blackballed by ownership and the NFL, but prevailed and was traded to the Cleveland Browns. Ted is credited as one of the first professional athletes to retain legal player representation, opening the door for future athletes. During his one year 1963 season with the Browns, Ted blocked for the legendary running back, Jim Brown, the year Brown broke the all-time 1900 yard rushing record when the NFL schedule included only 14 games. Ted played 92 games in his nine year NFL football career.
 
Taking time off from football career, First Lieutenant Connolly served 18 months in the Air Force Reserve at Hamilton Air Force Base in the military police and as coach of the Air Force football team, ending his active service with a huge win over Army in the Penrose Bowl in 1956. Ted was Honorable Discharged from Air Reserves as Captain on July 1, 1966.
 
“Not being able to support my family of 5 kids with an NFL salary”, he retired from football, and shortly after became Vice President of Development for Grubb & Ellis Real Estate. In 1966 he started Connolly Development, Inc., which developed over 40 shopping centers in California and Nevada. His first shopping center, Bonanza Square in Las Vegas, Nev., is still owned and operated by his family. 
 
Equally committed to civic and community activities, Ted’s service included the Advisory Committee on Voluntary Foreign Aid of Department of State’s Agency for International Development in Washington, D.C. ; President and Commissioner of the Port of Oakland for 12 years where he participated in completion of numerous international trade agreements and the expansion of the Oakland Airport; Airport Operations International Council; Director of the Alameda County Real Estate Board; Oakland Planning Commission; the Founder of the Oakland’s Mayor Sports Committee; and a founding director of the San Antonio Youth Project. 
 
Pursuing his passion for gourmet food and wine, in the early 70’s he developed Sky Hill Farms ranch in Napa Valley producing gourmet cheeses and yogurts from Nubian goats, and organic produce for local restaurants – one of the first “farm to market” providers in California. 
 
TC, as he was known to friends and family, will forever be remembered for his gregarious nature and love of people - best signified by his very firm, sometimes painful, handshake (taught to him by his Irish father) as he pulled you towards his smiling gray-blue eyes warmly welcoming you into his world. 
 
Theodore William Connolly is survived by his children Mark, Cary Byers (Jerry), Matthew (Sally), Chad, and Amy Katsanos; his grandchildren Wesley, Cole, Bryce, Austin and Dimitri; their supportive mother Mary Connolly, good friend Marjorie McGee, his siblings Francis Alexander and husband Ernie (deceased), Larry and wife Barbara, Norman (deceased)and his wife Deletta, and many loving nieces and nephews. He is also preceded in death by his sister Betty Spivey and husband Bill.
submitted Mar. 24, 2014 11:26A

1958

UGRD Arts & Sciences '58
James Leininger

James Leininger '58 was a skillful Santa Clara County defense attorney, a crusader for social justice and a member of a family with deep roots in San Jose. But as a recovering alcoholic, he was known just as well for helping others emerge from the shoals of substance abuse -- be they lawyers, nurses, cops or Hells Angels.

Leininger, 78, of Gilroy, died March 19, 2014 of leukemia at Stanford Medical Center, where he had been undergoing an experimental treatment for his illness.
 
"He loved what he did, and what he did was to help people. And that's what made all the difference,'' said Jim Gleason, the executive director of the Santa Clara County Independent Defense Counsel Office.
 
As a lawyer, Leininger enjoyed taking the toughest cases, ones other lawyers shunned. In the 2010 trial of the men accused in the killing of Los Gatos restaurateur Mark Achilli, Leininger represented middleman Miguel Chaidez, who was accused of paying the triggerman.
 
"He was confident, but he wasn't arrogant,'' said his son, Michael Leininger. "He would dissect a jury and find the most appealing way to get to them.''
Leininger was a member of "The Other Bar,'' a confidential lawyers' recovery group. And he helped found the organization now known as We Care, which has helped more than 3,000 nurses with substance abuse problems.
 
For much of his 45-year career as an attorney, Leininger had to balance work with the demands of caring for his wife, Helen, who suffered from chronic illness. The two had met at the Sears store on San Carlos Street in San Jose, where both worked as clerks. Helen Leininger died in 2009.
 
Leininger was born at O'Connor Hospital in San Jose on January 23, 1936, the son of Carl Leininger, who became San Jose's city engineer, and Mary Leininger, a homemaker. The third of seven children, Leininger came from a family devoted to public service and social justice. A brother, William, was a Catholic priest. Another brother, Robert, became a ranking official in San Jose's redevelopment agency.
 
A 1958 graduate of Santa Clara University, Leininger worked in War on Poverty programs in the mid-'60s, graduated from Lincoln Law School and served as executive director of the Catholic Council on Social Justice.
In that job, he shamed the San Jose City Council into rejecting a bid from the Elks Club, which at the time discriminated against nonwhites, to sponsor a circus at the Civic Auditorium. Leininger pointed out to a wavering Councilman Norm Mineta, later a mayor and congressman, that he would not be able to join the Elks because of his Japanese descent.
 
Leininger is survived by his son, Michael, Gilroy; two daughters, Kelly Douglas, Los Gatos; and Trish Loughnane, Woodland Hills, and seven grandchildren.
submitted Mar. 24, 2014 12:22P

1973

GRD Law '73
William F. Caro
see year 1954

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