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Michelle Bezanson

Michelle Bezanson

Associate Professor

CV

Michelle Bezanson is a biological anthropologist with research interests in evolutionary anthropology, primate positional behavior, and tropical forest ecology. Her field research has focused on infant, juvenile, and adult positional Behavior (posture and locomotion), tail use, and the behavioral, arboreal, and resource-based contexts of locomotor patterns in both New World and Old World primates. Currently, she is investigating how white-faced capuchins interact with and modify their arboreal environment to determine if they influence tree growth and epiphyte load. In addition, she is investigating the sustainability of anthropological field research and teaching in fragile ecosystems.

Courses
  • Anthropology 1: Introduction to Biological Anthropology
  • Anthropology 5: Popular Culture and Biological Anthropology
  • Anthropology 11a: Measuring Humanity
  • Anthropology 130: Primate Behavioral Ecology
  • Anthropology 197: Human Evolution Summer Field School in Primate Behavior and Ecology
Publications

Selected Publications:

Zhu. W, Garber, PA, Bezanson M, Qi, XG, Li BG 2015. Age and sex-based patterns of positional behavior in the Golden Snub-Nosed Monkey (Rhinopithecus roxellana). American Journal of Primatology. 77:98-108.

Bezanson M, Stowe R, Watts SM. 2013. Reducing the ecological impact of field research. American Journal of Primatology. 75: 1-9.

Bezanson M, Morbeck, M.E. 2013. Future adults or old children? Integrating life history frameworks for understanding primate locomotor patterns. In: Clancy K, Hinde K, and Rutherford J. (eds.) Building babies: primate development in proximate and ultimate perspective. Springer Book Series: Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects. Pp. 435-458.

Bezanson M. 2012. The ontogeny of prehensile-tail use in Cebus capucinus and Alouatta palliata. American Journal of Primatology. 74:770-782.

Bezanson M, Watts SM, Jobin MA. 2012. Tree truthing: How accurate are substrate estimates in primate field studies? American Journal of Physical Anthropology 147:671-677.