Skip to main content

Lesson Plans

Tuck Everlasting


40
The 40-Minute Lesson Plan is essential elements of the CBL lesson plan. We suggest the teacher reads aloud or uses an audio book for the reading portion. 40-min includes: Background, Wordwall, Key Paragraph, and Writing Prompt
60
The 60-Minute Lesson Plan uses the same elements as the 40-minute plan, but also covers a visual activity and discussion. 60-min includes: Background, Wordwall, Key Paragraph,Writing Prompt and adding the Key Questions
90
The 90-Minute Lesson Plan contains all elements of the lesson plan. If time is available, we recommend using this version to get all of the benefits of CBL. The full lesson includes: Background, Wordwall, Key Paragraph, Writing Prompt, and Key Questions of the 40 and 60 minutes options while incorporating the Mapping Activity, Visual Activity and creating the Timeline as a class.

Day 1

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background 

What would it be like not to change in appearance? What are the pros and cons?

There are benefits to being immortal such as living longer and seeing the future. However, the cons of the living forever are seeing your friends and family members pass on. What are some benefits and complications to being immortal?

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

balmy (3)

quivers (3)

hub (4)

tangent (5)

bovine (5)

 

Read

Review 

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read 

Read p. 3-12

Setting

Characters

Pages

August

Mae Tuck

3-12

Treegap

Miles & Jesse

3-12

 

Winnie Foster

3-12

 

Tuck

3-12

 

Respond

Timeline 

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Students might mention:

  • People did not enter the woods very often, therefore they didn’t know about the “spring.” The boys will be home tom
  • He was dreaming that he had never heard of Mae wants to ride into Treegap to meet the boys.
  • Her husband warns her against
  • She did not need to look at herself in the mirror—because she, her husband, and their sons, Miles and Jesse, had all looked the same for 87

Map 

Add to ongoing class activities like a KWL chart or map: where did the characters go?

 

Family Tree

Create a family tree for Winnie. 

KWL Chart

Create a KWL Chart on who are the characters and what do we know what we want to know.

Map

Create a map based on details given from the settings in the book. Update new locations or changes can be added to the map. What is the name of the town they live in?

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity. 

Open Mind Portrait

Create an Open Mind Portrait for Winnie.

Bookmark

Draw a bookmark illustrating the setting of the book or what you think the book is going to be about. Find a partner and ask questions on how they were able to create their illustration from the book’s content? How were they able to imagine what it looked like? What words or phrases did they find to help create their point of view?

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types.

Key Questions

  1. What would it be like to not age for your entire life?
  2. Would you get tired of looking the same?
  3. How do you think that would feel?
  4. If you had a choice, would you like to stay the same age your whole life? Why?
  5. How would your friends feel about you if you stayed the same age for the rest of your life?

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph. 

Key Paragraph, p. 11-12

“But, before she put on the hat, she brushed her gray-brown hair and wound it into a bun at the back of her neck. She did this quickly and skillfully without a single glance in the mirror. Mae Tuck didn’t need a mirror, though she had one propped up on the washstand. She knew very well what she would see in it; her reflection had long since ceased to interest her. For Mae Tuck, and her husband, and Miles and Jesse, too, had all looked exactly the same for eighty-seven years” (p. 11-12). 

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Go back into the text and look through pages 3-12 again. In two narrative paragraphs, use the clues the author gives you that describe how ‘different’ or unique the woods are. Pretend you are in the woods; describe the forest in first person. Describe the site with the use of all your senses.

You could also write a poem. Write a haiku, free verse, or even a rhyming poem. Please keep in mind that some poems tell stories. These poems tend to be quite long and often rhyme. Before writing and books were common, people used narrative poetry to tell stories. The rhymes and the rhythm made the stories easy to remember and pass on to other people.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

What is folklore?

Folklore is a belief or myth that are associated with a group of people, place and/or activity.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

bristly (13)

intrusions (14)

resentful (14)

exasperated (16)

jaunty (17)

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Setting

Characters

Pages

Treegap

Winnie

13-21

August

Winnie’s grandmother

13-21

 

A stranger

13-21

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Students might mention:

  • Winnie is feeling bored and wants to run away from home so she can experience freedom. A stranger comes calling that night and begins talking to Wi
  • Granny comes out and all three hear a tinkling
  • Granny says that elves make that The man is a suspicious character.

Map 

Add to ongoing class activities like a KWL chart or map: where did the characters go?

Family Tree

Continue to add, revise and change a family tree for Winnie.

KWL Chart

An answer can be added to a question from the KWL Chart on who are the characters and what do we know what we want to know.

Map

Create a map based on details given from the settings in the book. Update new locations or changes can be added to the map. Where are the characters in today's reading?

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Portrait

Draw what you think Winnie looks like. Look into the text and find clues on how to create her. Use this to help you illustrate her with words; use describing words to convey what she looks like to you. Is she someone you would want to talk to? Be friends with?

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Key Questions

  1. What does it feel like to be a kid and not have a lot of freedom?
  2. Have you ever felt like running away?
  3. How does Winnie feel?
  4. What is freedom?
  5. What are some words that are synonyms and antonyms of the word freedom?

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Key Paragraph, p. 15

“‘I suppose you’re right,’ said Winnie. ‘Then you’d be just the way I am, now. Why should you have to be cooped up in a cage, too? It’d be better if I could be like you, out in the open and making up my own mind. Do you know they’ve hardly ever let me out of this yard all by myself? I’ll never be able to do anything important if I stay in here like this. I expect I’d better run away.’ She paused and peered anxiously at the toad to see how it would be to receive this staggering idea, but it showed no signs of interest. ‘You think I wouldn’t dare, don’t you?’ she said accusingly. ‘I will though. You’ll see. Maybe even first thing in the morning, while everyone’s still asleep’” (p. 15).

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

In today’s reading Winnie feels like she is stuck being held captive. Have you ever experienced similar feelings in your own life? Frustrated and not allowed to experience life, being told to stay put.

In a narrative paragraph or two, tell what the situation was, how you felt, and ultimately how you handled it. Was your decision one that allowed you to act in a Responsible fashion as we have defined it?

In a narrative paragraph or two, write about the time you felt frustrated and identify before you write: How old were you? What happened? What was making you feel like you wanted to be older? Describe the scenario from that age. BE THAT AGE. Please remember to keep your audience in mind. Is the story interesting? Great details included? Can your reader visualize the picture you are painting with your words/word choice?

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 3

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background 

How do you know if a place is safe? How did you know when you were not safe?
There are some issues that are going on in today’s society. We take risks every time we wake up. We also take responsibility to chose our actions and depending on whether the actions are good or bad , the consequences. How do you know if you are in the right place at the right time? Why are children always told to beware of strangers? Why are children so often preyed upon? Is there ever a real safe place anywhere? Is there anything that lets you know you are not safe? Do you trust your gut? Have you ever felt unsafe? What did you do in that circumstance and/or situation?

Is stranger danger a real concern for children and teenagers?

It is important for children and teenagers to have a safety plan when they are away from home. The safety plan may include having an emergency phone number committed to memory, have safe places to go to, and people they can turn to if away from home.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

galling (23)

consolingly (23)

timidly (23)

dismay (34)

brisk (36)

Read

Review 

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read 

Read p. 22-36

Setting

Characters

Pages

The woods

Winnie

23-36

 

Jesse Tuck

23-36

 

Mae

23-36

 

Miles

23-36

 

Stranger

23-36

 

Respond

Timeline 

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Students might mention:

  • Winnie decided she would not run away from home, but she did decide to enter the woods for the first tim
  • Winnie stumbles upon Jesse Tuck, a beautiful boy that was sipping from the Winnie wanted to drink from the fountain and Jesse told her it would be a big mistake. Ma and Jesse’s older brother, Miles, showed up.
  • The Tucks kidnap Winnie for her own
  • As they leave the woods the stranger in the yellow suit is Winnie then panics a little and starts to cry and wants to go home. Mae takes out the music box and it calms everyone down.
  • The Tucks tell Winnie they need her

Map 

Add to ongoing class activities like a KWL chart or map: where did the characters go?

Family Tree

Continue to add, revise and change a family tree for Winnie. 

KWL Chart

Continue to answer questions from the KWL Chart.

Map

Create a map based on details given from the settings in the book. Update new locations or changes can be added to the map.

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity. 

Open Mind Portrait

Create an Open Mind Portrait for Jesse Tuck; look on pages 25-26 a description of Jesse.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types.

Key Questions

  1. Do you perceive the world as a safe or dangerous place? Why or why not?
  2. Is your imagination powerful? Can it put things in your head that don’t really exist?
  3. What are some things that help your world be a safe place? Give 2 examples.
  4. What did Tuck do to Winnie?
  5. Why does Winnie decide not to run away?
  6. What are other reasons why children decide to run away?

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph. 

Key Paragraph, p. 22-23

“It was one thing to talk about being by yourself, doing important things, but quite another when the opportunity arose. The characters in the stories she read always seemed to go off without a thought or care, but in real life—well, the world was a dangerous place. People were always telling her so. And she would not be able to manage without protection. They were always telling her that, too. No one ever said precisely what it was that she would not be able to manage. But she did not need to ask. Her own imagination supplied the horrors” (p. 22-23).

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Think back to a time when you were younger when you were afraid of something you are no longer afraid of. Perhaps you were afraid of the dark or you thought there might have been monsters under your bed.

Write about that experience as two narrative paragraphs. First, describe it from the perspective of the age that you were at the time. Then write about how you now know better. How did you conquer your fear(s)? Write so that your audience understands your POV (point of view). Is your narrative descriptive, well-structured and well-developed?

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 4

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

What is witchcraft? Are witches real?

Witches are considered to be folklore and witchcraft is considered to be fictional or a tall tale. Witches use black magic and spells to practice witchcraft.

How do you know when to trust someone? Is it worth risking your secret?

Trust is a risky endeavor. It can have huge drawbacks. The risk sometimes is worthwhile as it can be the basis of great relationships. The risk can also be drastically damaging to the person who trusts. Trusting someone enough to tell them an important secret.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

knobby (38)

whit (40)

peculiar (42)

parson (43)

scarcely (40)

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Read p. 37-45 

Setting

Characters

Pages

Woods

Winnie

37-45

 

Mae, Jesse, Miles

37-45

 

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Students might mention:

  • The Tucks tell Winnie about when they came upon the forest and the woods 87 years They drank from the spring, not knowing its special powers.
  • They began to realize that they were not
  • People thought that there was witchcraft involved so they had to leave their farm. They had realized they would live f
  • The Tucks said it felt so good to tell someone their
  • What they did not realize was that the stranger was eavesdropping nearby and heard the whole incredible

Map 

Add to ongoing class activities like a KWL chart or map: where did the characters go?

Family Tree

Continue to add, revise and change a family tree for Winnie.

KWL Chart

Continue to add, to a question from the KWL Chart. 

Map

Create a map based on details given from the settings in the book. Update new locations or changes can be added to the map.

Cube

Update cube questions.

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Sketch

On pages 37 and 38, Natalie Babbitt describes the clearing and the spring the first time the Tuck family found it. Sketch her description.

4G6 Character Profile Chart

You will need copies for each of the characters today: Winne, Jesse, Ma, Pa, Miles and Mae. Spend time creating each one. Students can work with elbow partners.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Key Questions

  1. What is it like to hear a secret?
  2. What was the Tucks’ secret? Were they excited to tell her? Did Winnie feel honored to be told their secret?
  3. Have you ever heard something and not believed it was true?
  4. Have you ever told a secret? Who did you tell and why?
  5. What kind of person would share your secret to? Name three reasons why?
  6. Is there a time when secrets should not be kept? Either way, please state why and support your answer.

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Key Paragraph, p. 37

“It was the strangest story Winnie had ever heard. She soon suspected they had never told it before, except to each other—that she was their first real audience; for they gathered around her like children at their mother’s knee, each trying to claim her attention, and sometimes they all talked at once, and interrupted each other in eagerness” (p. 37).

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Pretend you are Winnie. What would be your reaction to the idea of being able to live forever? Is this too incredible to believe? Would you want that? Why or why not?

In two to three narrative paragraphs, give both the pros and the cons to never growing up. Would you be prepared to suffer immortality? Losing all your loved ones? What could you personally accomplish?

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 5

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Is that really true? That isn’t possible is it?
A definition of willing suspension of disbelief as a reader “Suspension of Disbelief” is defined as specific elements used for fantasy or non-realistic uses in literature.  

What is Lyrical writing?
Writing that the way in which the writer expresses his emotions and imagination.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

vanity (46)

perilous (50)

scornful (42)

pastures (46)

embankment (47)

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Read p. 46-55

Setting

Characters

Pages

The Tuck’s home

Winnie

46-55

 

The Tucks

46-55

 

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Students might mention:

  • Mae and the boys bring Winnie back to meet Angus (nicknamed Tuck).
  • They bring her back to where they live and he is happy to meet a natural It’s been 80 years.
  • This is a beautiful lyrical description of the Tucks’ home—very comfortable and well

Map 

Add to ongoing class activities like a KWL chart or map: where did the characters go?

Family Tree

Continue to add, revise and change a family tree for Winnie.

KWL Chart

An answer can be added to a question from the KWL Chart.

Map

Create a map based on details given from the settings in the book. Update new locations or changes can be added to the map. Where are the characters in today's reading?

 Cube

Update cube questions.

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Open Mind Portrait

Create an Open Mind Portrait of Tuck based upon the description of him on page 48.

Sketch

Natalie Babbitt provides an excellent description of the Tuck household on pages 50-52. Sketch this scene.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Key Questions

  1. Why do you think Tuck enjoys meeting Winnie so much?
  2. What does that mean that she was an unexpected present?
  3. How long has it been since he has seen a “natural” child?
  4. What is the definition of a “natural” child according to the book?
  5. How does Winnie feel about Tuck?

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Key Paragraph, p. 49

“‘How do, Winnie Foster,’ said Tuck, shaking Winnie’s hand rather solemnly. ‘Well, then!’ He straightened and peered down at her, and Winnie, looking back into his face, saw an expression there that made her feel like an unexpected present, wrapped in pretty paper and tied with ribbons, in spite of Mae’s blue hat, which still enveloped her head. ‘Well, then,’ Tuck repeated, ‘seeing you know, I’ll go on and say this is the finest thing that’s happened in—oh—at least eighty years’” (p. 49).

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

How would you feel if you were Winnie and someone was admiring you and saying you were the neatest thing they had seen in 87 years? How does that compare to how Winnie felt at home?

Writing in first person, pretend you are Winnie and you are writing how things are different between you and your admirer and the people you have at home. What in his look shows approval? How important is body language? Can you convey emotion through body language? Everyone likes compliments. Does Winnie feel he is genuine? How would you describe this situation? What is the tone of your narrative writing? Your word choice is critical. Do your best to illustrate Tuck's admiration. Help the audience feel what you are feeling.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

 

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

 

Map 

 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 1

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background 

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

 

Read

Review 

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read 

Respond

Timeline 

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Map 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity. 

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types.

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph. 

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

 

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

 

Map 

 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

 

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

 

Map 

 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

 

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

 

Map 

 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 1

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background 

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

 

Read

Review 

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read 

Respond

Timeline 

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Map 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity. 

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types.

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph. 

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 1

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background 

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

 

Read

Review 

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

Read 

Respond

Timeline 

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

Map 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity. 

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types.

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph. 

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

 

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

 

Map 

 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

 

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

 

Map 

 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.

Day 2

Responsibility Requires Action. Responsibility is the active side of morality: doing what I should do, doing what I said I would do, doing what is best for everybody; especially doing the one thing I should be doing right now.

Outcomes for Today

W3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, relevant descriptive details, and well-structured event sequences.

a.) Engage and orient the reader by establishing a context and point of view and introducing a narrator and/or characters; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally and logically.

b.) Use narrative techniques, such as dialogue, pacing, and description, to develop experiences, events, and/or characters.

c.) Use a variety of transition words, phrases, and clauses to convey sequence and signal shifts from one frame to another.

d.) Use precise words and phrases, relevant descriptive details, and sensory language to capture the action and convey experiences and events.

e.) Provide a conclusion that follows from and reflects on the narrated experiences or events.

W4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1-3.)

  1. With some guidance and support from peers and adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on how well purpose and audience have been addressed.

W10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of discipline-specific tasks, purposes, and audiences.

Prepare

Background

Gather background knowledge about a place, time, event, person, or thing.

Word Wall

Here are five vocabulary words to teach and add to the Word Wall.

Introduce 5 important, useful words from today’s reading. 

Read

Review

Review the timeline from the beginning every day.

 

Read

Read the selection, usually in a Shared Reading Read React Predict Cycle of 2-3 pages.

Respond

Timeline

Agree on the facts in today’s reading, and list the 3-5 most important on the Timeline.

Discuss the reading and add 3-5 events to the timeline.

  • Discuss the story to fix the facts: who, what, when, where, and why.
  • Decide on the 3-5 most important events and add these to the timeline.

 

Map 

 

Explore

Activity

Explore the reading more deeply with a visual or oral language activity.

Discussion

Ask discussion questions of all 9 types (See Day 1). 

Analyze

Analyze the key paragraph.

Extend

Write

Have each student write a short product based on today’s prompt to connect to the unit theme.

Close 

Close by extending today’s lesson to life and the world.

Extend the reading to the students’ lives or to the world.