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Graduate Bulletin

2018-2019 Academic Year

Click here to download a PDF version of the SCU Engineering Bulletin 2018-2019.

Letter from the Dean

On behalf of the School of Engineering faculty and staff, I welcome you to a new year in your graduate school journey. If you are newly embarking on the next step in your academic journey, or if you are continuing along a path that we hope you have already found stimulating and fulfilling at Santa Clara, we are here to help you. Some of you are continuing your engineering education along the path that you started as an undergraduate. Others of you might be seeking to change the trajectory of your engineering career. Still others of you might be boldly changing the very field in which you seek to contribute your talents. We here at Santa Clara University are ready to help you on your graduate journey, wherever it started and wherever it will take you. Santa Clara University is committed to providing you a graduate education that combines rigorous instruction in fundamentals with the art of engineering practice. A Santa Clara graduate education will advance not only your technical knowledge and skills, but will provide you the tools and skills to be a life-long learner, skills that are critical in today’s rapidly changing and competitive workplaces that drive engineering innovation. Your graduate education will empower you to truly use your intellect and creativity as an engineer to its fullest expression.

The Santa Clara graduate engineering program aims to produce not only outstanding engineers, but also engineering leaders of uncompromising dedication, integrity and conscience who are able lead in an increasingly complex global environment. As the Jesuit University in Silicon Valley, Santa Clara University is proud to be a vital and unique part of the limitless innovative force that is the heart of the Valley. Silicon Valley pioneers were driven to explore, to innovate, and to improve society through advances in engineering. That quest continues today not only in the Valley but truly in the minds of every engineer who wants to make a difference. At Santa Clara University, you will find a community of teachers and scholars that will stimulate your imagination, expand your knowledge, and nurture your conscience and compassion so that you can be part of a profession that can and will create a more just, humane, prosperous, and sustainable world.

For over 100 years, the School of Engineering at Santa Clara University has helped students turn their dreams to reality. We stand ready in our second century of engineering excellence to help you in your journey. Welcome to Santa Clara University.

Sincerely,

Alfonso Ortega, Ph.D.
John M. Sobrato Professor of Engineering
Dean, School of Engineering

Academic Calendar 2018-2019

All dates are inclusive.

Registration dates are subject to change.

Registration holds must be cleared with the appropriate office by 5 p.m. on Friday when an e-campus deadline to add or drop a class falls on a Sunday.

Fall, Winter, Spring and Summer Quarter refund polices: www.scu.edu/bursar

July 16-20 Monday-Friday Fall 2018 registration period
August 21 Tuesday Tuition and fee payment due
September 3 Monday Labor Day; administrative holiday. Consult instructor.
September 10 Monday Drop/Swap begins; $50 per course
September 10 Monday Late registration; $100 fee if no previous enrollment
September 17 Monday Classes begin
September 19 Wednesday New Student Orientation
September 21 Friday Last day to petition for graduate degrees to be conferred in December 2018
September 23 Sunday Last day to change registration or withdraw from classes with a 100% tuition refund (less fees)  (Clear registration holds by 5 p.m., Friday)
September 26 Wednesday

Mass of the Holy Spirit, 12 p.m. at the Mission Church. Classes will not meet from11:45-1:15pm. Classes scheduled to begin at 1 pm will begin instead at 1:15pm (some classes may meet, consult with instructor)

September 30 Sunday Last day to withdraw from classes with a 50 % tuition refund (less fees) 
October 5 Friday Last day to submit incomplete work to faculty for spring and summer 2018
October 7 Sunday Last day to withdraw from classes with a 25% tuition refund (less fees) 
October 12 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes and not receive a W (no tuition refund)
October 12 Friday Last day for faculty to remove Spring 2018 and Summer Session 2018 incompletes
October 15-19 Monday-Friday Winter 2019 registration period
November 2 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes with a W grade
November 19-23 Monday-Friday Thanksgiving recess; academic holiday (consult instructor)
November 22-23 Thursday-Friday Thanksgiving recess; administrative holiday
November 30 Friday Classes end
December 3-7 Monday-Friday Fall quarter final examinations
December 12 Wednesday Fall quarter grades due
December 21 Friday Tuition and fee payment deadline
December 24-25 Monday-Tuesday Christmas recess; administrative holiday
December 31-January 1 Monday-Tuesday New Year’s recess; administrative holiday

 

February 22FridayLast day to withdraw from classes with a W

February 22FridayLast day to drop classes with a W

October 15-19 Monday-Friday Winter 2019 registration period
December 21 Friday Tuition and fee payment due
December 31 Monday Drop/Swap begins; $50 per course
December 31 Monday Late registration begins; $100 fee if no previous enrollment
January 7 Monday Classes begin
January 9 Wednesday New Student Orientation
January 11 Friday Last Day to petition for graduate degrees to be conferred in March 2019
January 13 Sunday Last day to change registration or withdraw from classes with a 100% tuition refund (less fees) (Clear registration holds by 5 p.m., Friday)
January 20 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes with a 50% tuition refund (less fees)
January 21 Monday Martin Luther King Day; administrative holiday. Consult instructor.
January 25 Friday Last day to submit incomplete fall quarter 2018 work to faculty
January 27 Sunday Last day to withdraw from classes with a 25% tuition refund (less fees)
February 1 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes and not receive a W grade (no tuition refund)
February 1 Friday Last day for faculty to remove Fall 2018 incompletes
February 4-8 Monday-Friday Spring 2019 registration period
February 18 Monday Presidents’ Day; administrative holiday. (Consult instructor)
February 22 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes with a W
February 22 Friday Last day to petition for graduate degrees to be conferred in June 2019
March 15 Friday Classes end
March 18-22 Monday-Friday Winter quarter final examinations
March 21 Thursday Tuition and fee payment deadline
March 27 Wednesday Winter quarter grades due

 

February 4-8 Monday-Friday Spring 2019 registration period
February 22 Friday Last day to petition for graduate degrees to be conferred in June 2019
March 21 Thursday Tuition and fee payment due
March 25 Monday Drop/Swap begins; $50 per course
March 25 Monday Late registration begins; $100 fee if no previous enrollment
April 1 Monday Classes begin
April 3 Wednesday New Student Orientation
April 7 Sunday Last day to change registration or withdraw from classes with a 100% tuition refund. (less fees) (Clear registration holds by 4/5 by 4:00 p.m.)
April 8-12 Monday-Friday Summer 2019 registration period for current students for all three sessions
April 14 Sunday Last day to withdraw from classes with a 50 % tuition refund (less fees)
April 19 Friday Last day to submit incomplete work to faculty for Winter 2019
April 19 Friday Good Friday; academic and administrative holiday (Consult instructor)
April 21 Sunday Last day to withdraw from classes with 25% tuition refund (less fees)
April 26 Friday Last day for faculty to remove Winter 2019 incompletes)
April 26 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes with 25% tuition refund (less fees)
May 17/td> Friday Last day to withdraw from classes with a W
May 21 Tuesday Tuition and fee payment deadline
May 27 Monday Memorial Day; academic and administrative holiday. (consult instructor)
June 7 Friday Classes end
June 10-14 Monday-Friday Spring quarter final examinations
June 14 Friday Graduate Commencement
June 19 Wednesday Spring quarter grades due

 

April 8-12 Monday-Friday Registration period for current students for all three sessions
May 21 Tuesday Tuition and fee payment deadline
June 17 Monday Late registration; $100 fee if no previous enrollment
June 17 Monday Drop/Swap begins; $50 per course
June 24 Monday Classes begin for Summer Sessions I and II
June 28 Friday Last day to register for all three sessions
July 4 Thursday Independence Day observed; administrative holiday. Classes will meet
July 5 Sunday Last day to petition for graduate degrees to be conferred in September 2019
July 26 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes for Session II only (no tuition refund)
July 26 Friday Classes end for Session II only
July 29-30 Monday, Tuesday Summer Session II final examinations
August 5 Monday Classes begin for Summer Session III
August 30 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes for Session I only (no tuition refund)
August 30 Friday Classes end for Session I only
September 2-6 Monday-Friday Summer Session I final examinations
September 6 Monday Labor day observed; administrative holiday: classes will meet
September 6 Friday Classes end for Session III only
September 6 Friday Last day to withdraw from classes for Session III only
September 9-10 Monday, Tuesday Summer Session III final examinations

 

Santa Clara University

Located in the heart of California’s Silicon Valley, Santa Clara University is a comprehensive Jesuit, Catholic university with more than 8,800 students. Founded in 1851 by the Society of Jesus, California’s oldest operating higher education institution offers a rigorous undergraduate curriculum in arts and sciences, business, and engineering, plus nationally recognized graduate and professional programs in business, law, engineering, education, counseling psychology, pastoral ministries, and theology. The University boasts a diverse community of scholars offering a values-oriented curriculum characterized by small class sizes and a dedication to educating students for competence, conscience, and compassion. The traditions of Jesuit education—educating the whole person for a life of service—run deep in all of its curricular and co-curricular programs.

Santa Clara University is perennially ranked among the top comprehensive universities by U.S. News & World Report and has one of the highest graduation rates for undergraduate students among all comprehensive universities. The University has a national reputation for its undergraduate program that features a distinctive core curriculum, an integrated learning environment, and research opportunities for undergraduate students.

The University was established as Santa Clara College on the site of the Mission Santa Clara de Asís, the eighth of the original 21 California missions. The college originally operated as a preparatory school and did not offer collegiate courses until 1853. Following the Civil War, enrollment increased, and by 1875 the size of the student body was 275. One-third of the students were enrolled in the collegiate division; the remainder attended the college’s preparatory and high school departments.

Santa Clara experienced slow and steady growth during its first 60 years, becoming the University of Santa Clara in 1912, when the schools of engineering and law were added. In 1925, the high school was separated from the University and took the name of
Bellarmine College Preparatory in 1928. The Leavey School of Business opened in 1926, and within a decade, became one of the first business schools in the country to receive national accreditation.

For 110 years, Santa Clara was an all-male school. In the fall of 1961, women were accepted as undergraduates, and Santa Clara became the first coeducational Catholic university in California. The decision resulted in an admissions explosion—from 1,500 students to more than 5,000. The size of the faculty tripled, and the University began the largest building program in school history, building eight residence halls, a student union, and an athletic stadium. In 1985, the University adopted “Santa Clara University” as its official name.

Santa Clara University will educate citizens and leaders of competence, conscience, and compassion, and cultivate knowledge and faith to build a more humane, just, and sustainable world.

University Mission
The University pursues its vision by creating an academic community that educates the whole person within the Jesuit, Catholic tradition, making student learning our central focus, continuously improving our curriculum and co-curriculum, strengthening our scholarship and creative work, and serving the communities of which we are a part in Silicon Valley and around the world.

Student learning takes place at the undergraduate and graduate level in an educational environment that integrates rigorous inquiry and scholarship, creative imagination, reflective engagement with society, and a commitment to fashioning a more humane and just world.

As an academic community, we expand the boundaries of knowledge and insight through teaching, research, artistic expression, and other forms of scholarship. It is primarily through discovering, communicating, and applying knowledge that we exercise our institutional responsibility as a voice of reason and conscience in society.

We offer challenging academic programs and demonstrate a commitment to the
development of:

  • Undergraduate students who seek an education with a strong humanistic orientation in a primarily residential setting.
  • Graduate students, many of them working professionals in Silicon Valley, who seek advanced degree programs that prepare them to make significant contributions to their fields.

In addition to these core programs, we also provide a variety of continuing education and professional development opportunities for non-matriculated students.

Fundamental Values
The University is committed to these core values, which guide us in carrying out our mission and realizing our vision:

Academic Excellence. We seek an uncompromising standard of excellence in teaching, learning, creativity, and scholarship within and across disciplines.

Search for Truth, Goodness, and Beauty. We prize scholarship and creative work that advance human understanding, improve teaching and learning, and add to the betterment of society by illuminating the most significant problems of the day and exploring the enduring mysteries of life. In this search, our commitment to academic freedom is unwavering.

Engaged Learning. We strive to integrate academic reflection and direct experience in the classroom and the community, especially to understand and improve the lives of those with the least education, power, and wealth.

Commitment to Students. As teachers and scholars, mentors and facilitators, we endeavor to educate the whole person. We nurture and challenge students—intellectually, spiritually, aesthetically, morally, socially, and physically—preparing them for leadership and service to the common good in their professional, civic, and personal lives.

Service to Others. We promote throughout the University a culture of service—service not only to those who study and work at Santa Clara but also to society in general and its most disadvantaged members as we work with and for others to build a more humane, just, faith-filled, and sustainable world.

Community and Diversity. We cherish our diverse and inclusive community of students, faculty, staff, administrators, and alumni, a community that is enriched by people of different backgrounds, respectful of the dignity of all its members, enlivened by open communication, and caring and just toward others.

Jesuit Distinctiveness. We treasure our Jesuit heritage and tradition, which incorporates all of these core values. This tradition gives expression to our Jesuit educational mission and Catholic identity while also welcoming and respecting other religious and philosophical traditions, promoting the dialogue between faith and culture, and valuing opportunities to deepen religious beliefs.

Santa Clara University offers undergraduate degrees leading to the bachelor of arts (B.A.), bachelor of science (B.S.), and bachelor of science in commerce. The College of Arts and Sciences offers the B.A. degree and the B.S. degree in 33 subject areas and includes the graduate program in pastoral ministries, through which it offers the master of arts (M.A.) degree in catechetics, pastoral liturgy, spirituality, and liturgical music. The Leavey School of Business offers the B.S. degree in commerce with majors in eight subject areas. The School of Engineering offers a B.S. degree with majors in seven subject areas. A variety of interdisciplinary and discipline-based minors are also offered for undergraduates.

The School of Law offers programs leading to the degrees of juris doctor (J.D.) and master of laws (LL.M.). J.D. students may earn certificates of specialization in high technology law, international law, and public interest and social justice law. LL.M students may earn master of laws in intellectual property or U.S. law. A broad curriculum also includes business and commercial law, taxation, criminal law and trial advocacy, environmental law, estate planning, labor law, health law, legal writing and research, as well as opportunities for externships, clinical work, and professional skill development.

The Leavey School of Business offers graduate programs leading to the master of business administration (MBA) degree with coursework in accounting, economics, finance, management, marketing, and operations management and information systems (OMIS). The business school also offers graduate programs leading to the master of science in information systems (MSIS), business analytics, supply chain management, or finance. In conjunction with the law school, the business school also offers joint degree programs leading to a J.D./MBA and J.D./MSIS.

The School of Engineering offers graduate programs leading to the master of science (M.S.) degree in applied mathematics; bioengineering; civil, environmental, and sustainable engineering; computer science and engineering; electrical engineering; engineering management; mechanical engineering; software engineering; and sustainable energy; and the engineer’s degree in computer science and engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering. The engineering school also offers the doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degree in computer science and engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering.

The two departments in the School of Education and Counseling Psychology offer credential and graduate programs. The Department of Education focuses on preparing teachers and administrators for public and Catholic schools. It offers programs in teacher preparation leading to credentials (i.e., California preliminary multiple-subject and single-subject teaching credentials, and California Clear credential) and the master of arts in teaching (MAT) degree. Its programs in educational administration prepare public K–12 administrators (i.e., the Preliminary California Administrative Services credential and the California Clear Administrative Services credential), and Catholic school leaders through the certificate program in Catholic School Leadership. The department also offers an M.A. program in interdisciplinary education (with emphases in curriculum and instruction; science, technology, environmental education, and mathematics [STEEM]; and educational administration). The departments of Education and Counseling Psychology jointly offer the certificate program in Alternative and Correctional Education. The Department of Counseling Psychology offers two degree programs: M.A. in counseling psychology and M.A. in counseling. The M.A. in counseling psychology can lead to state licensure for marriage and family therapists and/or licensed professional clinical counselors. The department includes emphasis programs in health, correctional, and Latino counseling.

The Jesuit School of Theology (JST) is one of only two Jesuit theological centers in the United States operated by the Society of Jesus, as the order of Catholic priests is known. It is one of only two Jesuit theological centers in the country that offer three ecclesiastical degrees certified by the Vatican Congregation for Catholic Education, and it also offers four advanced theological degrees certified by the Association of Theological Schools. In addition, JST offers a spiritual renewal program for clergy, religious, and lay people, and conducts an annual Instituto Hispano that offers a certificate program to advance Hispanic leadership in the pastoral life of the church.

Santa Clara University has three Centers of Distinction that serve as major points of interaction between the University and local and global communities. Each center focuses on a theme that is central to Santa Clara’s distinctive mission as a Jesuit university and offers an educational environment integrating rigorous inquiry and scholarship, creative imagination, reflective engagement with society, and a commitment to fashioning a more humane and just world. Each center engages faculty and students from different disciplines as well as experts and leaders from the community through speakers, conferences, workshops, and experiential learning opportunities.

Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship
The mission of the Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship is to accelerate global, innovation-based entrepreneurship in service to humanity. Through an array of programs including its signature Global Social Benefit Institute (GSBI™), the Center engages an international network of social enterprises, investment capital, and technical resources to build the capacity of the global social entrepreneurship movement. As a Center of Distinction at Santa Clara University, the Center leverages its programs to inspire faculty and students with real-world case studies, distinctive curricula, and unique research opportunities, advancing the University’s vision of creating a more just, humane, and sustainable world. More information can be found at the Miller Center for Social Entrepreneurship website.

Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education
The Ignatian Center for Jesuit Education promotes and enhances the distinctively Jesuit, Catholic tradition of education at Santa Clara University, with a view toward serving students, faculty, staff, and through them the larger community, both local and global. The Ignatian Center achieves this mission chiefly through four signature programs:

  • Bannan Institutes provide yearlong thematic programs including academic events and scholarly activities that further the Jesuit, Catholic character of the University.
  • Community-based learning places more than 1,200 students each year with community partners, frequently in connection with an academic course.
  • Immersion programs offer students, during academic breaks, the opportunity to experience local, domestic, and international communities with little access to wealth, power, and privilege.
  • Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius provide opportunities for members of the community to encounter the spiritual sources of the Jesuit tradition.

Through these four programs, the Ignatian Center aspires to be recognized throughout Silicon Valley and beyond as providing leadership for the integration of faith, justice, and the intellectual life. Learn more at www.scu.edu/ic/.

Markkula Center for Applied Ethics
The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics brings the traditions of ethical thinking to bear on real-world problems. Our mission is to engage individuals and organizations in making choices that respect and care for others. Beyond a full range of events, grants, and fellowships for the Santa Clara University community, the Center serves professionals in business, education, health care, government, journalism, and the social sector, providing training, programs, and roundtables that explore the ethical challenges in the field. In addition, we focus on ethical issues in leadership, technology, and the internet. Through our website and international collaborations, we also bring ethical decision making resources to the wider world. Learn more at www.scu.edu/ethics.

Santa Clara University’s emphasis on a community of scholars and integrated education attracts faculty members who are as committed to students’ intellectual and moral development as they are to pursuing their own scholarship. The University’s 530 full-time faculty members include Fulbright professors, nationally recognized authors, groundbreaking scientists, and distinguished economic theorists.

Santa Clara University has a student population of 9,015, with 5,438 undergraduate students and 3,296 graduate students. The undergraduate population has a male-to-female ratio of 50-to-50, and about 57 percent of undergraduate students identify themselves as persons of color. About 62 percent of undergraduates are from California, with the others coming from throughout the United States and 44 countries. Seventy-seven percent of undergraduate students receive some kind of financial aid–scholarships, grants, or loans. More than half (53 percent) of the undergraduate population live in University housing, with 90 percent of first-year students and 70 percent of sophomores living on campus. Students experience an average class size of 23, with 42 percent of classes having fewer than 20 students and only 1.6 percent of classes having 50 or more students. The student-to-faculty ratio is 12-to-1.

The University’s commitment to learning is expressed in the fact that 96.2 percent of first-year students advance to the sophomore year, and the percentage of Santa Clara students who graduate is among the highest in the country. The four-year graduation rate for entering first-year students is 78 percent, with a five-year graduation rate of 84 percent and a six-year graduation rate of 85.2 percent.

Santa Clara University has over 94,000 alumni living in all 50 states and almost 100 countries. More than half of the alumni live in the San Francisco Bay Area, where many are leaders in business, law, engineering, academia, and public service.

Amidst all this beauty and history are modern, world-class academic facilities. Students study and thrive in places such as the Joanne E. Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato Family Technology Center, and Orradre Library where individuals and groups can study in an inviting, light-filled, and open environment. Notably, the library features an Automated Retrieval System, a high-density storage area where up to 900,000 books and other publications can be stored and retrieved using robotic-assisted technology.

Another example of Santa Clara’s excellent academic facilities is Lucas Hall, home of the Leavey School of Business. This modern 85,000-square-foot building houses classrooms, meeting rooms, offices, study spaces, and a café. Classrooms are equipped with state-of-the art videoconferencing equipment as well as a multi-platform system to record faculty lectures for later review by students. Vari Hall (formerly Arts & Sciences), adjacent to Lucas Hall, is home to the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics as well as academic departments, classrooms, and a 2,200-square-foot digital television studio, regarded as among the best studios found on any campus nationwide.

Located near Vari Hall (formerly Arts & Sciences) is the Schott Admission and Enrollment Services Building, a welcome center for campus visitors and home to several University departments. Opened in 2012, the lobby of this green-certified structure includes technology-infused exhibits that illustrate Santa Clara’s Jesuit mission. Among other green features on campus are two solar-powered homes built in 2007 and 2009 for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solar Decathlon. Both homes now serve as laboratories for solar and sustainability technologies.

The University is located on a 106-acre campus in the city of Santa Clara near the southern end of the San Francisco Bay in one of the world’s greatest cultural centers. More than 50 buildings on campus house 15 student residences, a main library, a law library, two student centers, the de Saisset Museum, extensive performing arts and athletic facilities, and a recreation and fitness center.

Santa Clara’s campus has the advantage of being located in Silicon Valley, a region known for its extraordinary visionaries, who have designed and created some of the most significant scientific and technological advances of our age. Silicon Valley is more than a location—it is a mindset, and home to more than 3 million residents and 6,600 science and technology-related companies (not including San Francisco, which is located just an hour away).

Santa Clara’s campus is well known for its beauty and mission-style architecture. Opened in 2013, the brick-paved Abby Sobrato Mall leads visitors from the University’s main entrance to the heart of campus—the Mission Santa Clara de Asís. The roses and palm and olive trees of the Mission Gardens surround the historic Mission Church, which was restored in 1928. The adjacent Adobe Lodge is the oldest building on campus. In 1981, it was restored to its 1822 decor.

Engineering at Santa Clara

The undergraduate programs leading to the Bachelor of Science degree in Civil, Electrical, and Mechanical Engineering were first offered at Santa Clara University in 1912; the programs were accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology in 1937. Since that time, the following degree programs have been added: Bachelor of Science in Computer Science and Engineering and in Engineering; Master of Science in Applied Mathematics, Bioengineering, Civil, Environmental & Sustainable Engineering, Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Engineering Management and Leadership, Mechanical Engineering, Software Engineering and Power Systems and Sustainable Energy; Engineer’s degree in Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Mechanical Engineering; and Doctor of Philosophy in Computer Science and Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering. In addition, the School of Engineering offers a variety of certificate programs, as well as an Open University program.

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING MISSION STATEMENT

The mission of Santa Clara University’s School of Engineering is to prepare diverse students for professional excellence, responsible citizenship, and service to society. The engineering school does this through:

  • Distinctive academic programs that are designed to produce engineers who approach
    their profession with competence, conscience, and compassion
  • Broadly educated faculty, who model and encourage the notion of lifelong learning
  • Scholarly activities that create new knowledge and advance the state of the art of technology
  • Interactions with professional societies and companies in Silicon Valley and beyond
  • Service activities that benefit our diverse constituencies and humanity in general

SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING VISION

The School of Engineering will be known and treasured, in Silicon Valley and beyond, for the impact of its graduates and faculty on improving the human condition through engineering education, practice, and scholarship.

Contact Us

Engineering Graduate Programs
Santa Clara University
500 El Camino Real
Santa Clara, CA 95053

Guadalupe Hall, Bldg. 455, Suite 330

408-554-4313
408-554-4323 fax