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Graduate Programs

Programs & Admissions

Academic Programs and Requirements

More than 800 students attend Santa Clara University’s graduate engineering programs each quarter. The School of Engineering offers a large variety of programs to meet the needs of these engineering professionals.

The School of Engineering offers qualified Santa Clara University undergraduates the opportunity to earn both a bachelor of science and a master of science degree in five years. This is an excellent way to save time and open up more career possibilities early on. The degree is offered in bioengineering, civil engineering, computer science and engineering, electrical engineering, engineering management and leadership**, mechanical engineering and software engineering. This program is also open to students in the College of Arts and Sciences who are majoring in mathematics, biology, computer science or engineering physics.

The application fee and GRE General Test requirement are waived. Automatic admission into the five year program is based on a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major. Upon notification of acceptance into the B.S./M.S. program, students may begin taking graduate-level courses in their senior year and a maximum of 20 units can be transferred into the graduate program. Students must meet with a graduate advisor and submit a program of studies with the undergraduate transfer credit listed.

Please Note: Undergraduate students will be charged the current undergraduate tuition rate while enrolled in those graduate courses. Once students have been matriculated into the master’s degree program, current graduate tuition rates will be charged.

**For more information on the engineering management and leadership option, please see Chapter 14.

Certificate programs are designed to provide intensive background in a focused area at the graduate level. With 16-20 required units for completion, each certificate is designed to be completed in a much shorter period of time than an advanced degree. Santa Clara’s certificate programs are appropriate for students working in industry who wish to update their skills or for those interested in changing their career path. All units applied toward the certificate program must be earned within a two year period. Certificate programs are designed to provide intensive background in a focused area at the graduate level. With 16-20 required units for completion, each certificate is designed to be completed in a much shorter period of time than an advanced degree. Santa Clara’s certificate programs are appropriate for students working in industry who wish to update their skills or for those interested in changing their career path. All units applied toward the certificate program must be earned within a two year period.

All Santa Clara University courses applied toward the completion of a certificate program earn graduate credit that may also be applied toward a graduate degree, subject to the requirements of the degree program. Students who wish to continue for such a degree must submit a separate application and satisfy all normal admission requirements. The general Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test requirement for graduate admission to the master’s degree will be waived for students who have been formally admitted to and who have completed a certificate program with a GPA of 3.5 or better.

Certificate programs are offered in frugal innovation, renewable energy, software engineering, information assurance, networking, ASIC design and test, analog circuit design, digital signal processing applications, digital signal processing theory, microwave and antennas, fundamentals of electrical engineering, , mechanical design analysis, mechatronics systems engineering, dynamics, controls, and thermofluids. For more specific information on each certificate, please see Chapter 7.

Please Note: Santa Clara University does not issue F-1 visas to applicants who wish to enter directly into this program.

Continuation for a Master’s Degree
As stated above, all Santa Clara University courses applied toward the completion of a certificate program earn graduate credit that may also be applied toward a graduate degree. Students who wish to pursue such a degree must submit a separate application and satisfy all normal admission requirements. The general GRE test requirement for graduate admission to the master’s degree will be waived for students who complete a certificate program with a GPA of 3.5 or better.

The master’s program is designed to extend the technical breadth and depth of an engineer’s knowledge. Students in this program complete a program of studies approved by the faculty advisor in the major department. The program must include no less than 45 quarter units and a 3.0 GPA (B average) must be earned in all coursework taken at Santa Clara. Residence requirements of the University are met by completing 36 quarter units of the graduate program at Santa Clara. A maximum of 9 quarter units (6 semester units) of graduate-level coursework may be transferred from other accredited institutions that have not been applied to a previous degree at the discretion of the student’s advisor. All units applied toward the degree, including those transferred from other institutions, must be earned within a six-year period.

Students have the option to write a thesis as part of their master’s degree. Students who choose this option are responsible for obtaining an advisor for their thesis work. The maximum number of units awarded for the master’s thesis is nine. Please note that the thesis option is not available in Engineering Management.

The School of Engineering offers master’s programs in applied mathematics, bioengineering, civil engineering, computer science and engineering, software engineering, electrical engineering, engineering management and leadership, mechanical engineering and sustainable energy. The coursework requirements for the degree are determined by each of the major departments. In order to graduate, students must complete the required coursework for the program to which they are admitted and must have a cumulative GPA of 3.0 in all coursework listed on their approved program of study. In addition to this requirement, Engineering Management and Leadership degree candidates must earn a 3.0 GPA in those courses applied to their technical stem and a 3.0 GPA in their engineering management course stem.

Please note: Only classes with assigned grades of C- or higher will count toward the completion of the certificates, M.S. or Ph.D. degrees.

Note that the number of engineering management courses accepted for other degrees in the graduate engineering program is restricted to six units in computer engineering, electrical engineering, and most options of mechanical engineering.

The graduate minor in science, technology, and society (STS) is designed to help students gain a deeper understanding of the influence that engineering has on society (and vice versa). Knowledge of this kind has become essential in an increasingly complex and interconnected world, in which purely technical expertise often needs to be supplemented by additional skills. In order to successfully operate in such an environment, engineers must (at the very least) have the ability to communicate clearly, function on interdisciplinary and diverse teams, and make ethically and socially responsible decisions. The minor consists of a Core and a set of electives, and entails a minimum of 12 units of coursework. It is open to all students who are pursuing a master’s degree in engineering, regardless of the specific program in which they are enrolled.

For more comprehensive information, please see Science, Technology and Society (STS) Minor.

The program leading to the engineer’s degree is particularly designed for the education of the practicing engineer. It is offered in the computer science and engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering departments. The degree is granted on completion of an approved academic program and a record of acceptable technical achievement in the student’s field of engineering. The academic program consists of a minimum of 45 quarter units beyond the master’s degree. Courses are selected to advance competence in specific areas relating to the engineering professional’s work. Evidence of technical achievement must include a paper principally written by the student and accepted for publication by a recognized engineering journal prior to the granting of the degree. A letter from the journal accepting the paper must be submitted to the department chairperson. In certain cases, the department may accept publication in the proceedings of an appropriate conference.

Admission to the program will generally be granted to those students who demonstrate superior ability in meeting the requirements for their master’s degree. Normally, the master’s degree is earned in the same field as that in which the engineer’s degree is sought. Students who have earned a master’s degree from Santa Clara University must file a new application (by the deadline) to continue work toward the engineer’s degree. A program of studies for the engineer’s degree should be developed with the assistance of an advisor and submitted during the first term of enrollment.

The doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) degree is sought by those engineers who wish to become experts in a specific area within their field. The work for the degree consists of engineering research, the preparation of a thesis based on that research, and a program of advanced studies in engineering, mathematics, and related physical sciences. The student’s work is directed by the degree-conferring department, subject to the general supervision of the School of Engineering. The school grants the Ph.D. in computer science and engineering, electrical engineering, and mechanical engineering.

Preliminary Examination
The preliminary examination shall be written and oral, and shall include subject matter deemed by the major department to represent sufficient preparation in depth and breadth for advanced study in the major. Only those who pass the written examination may take the oral.

Students currently studying at Santa Clara University for a master’s degree who are accepted for the Ph.D. program and who are at an advanced stage of the M.S. program may, with the approval of their academic advisor, take the preliminary examination before completing the M.S. degree requirements.

Students who have completed the M.S. degree requirements and have been accepted for the Ph.D. program should take the preliminary examination as soon as possible but not more than one and one-half years after beginning the program.

Only those students who pass the preliminary examination shall be allowed to continue in the doctoral program. The preliminary examination may be repeated only once and only at the discretion of the thesis advisor.

Thesis Advisor
It is the student’s responsibility to obtain consent from a full-time faculty member in the student’s major department to serve as his/her prospective thesis advisor.

It is strongly recommended that Ph.D. students find a thesis advisor before taking the preliminary examination. After passing the preliminary examination, Ph.D. students should have a thesis advisor before the beginning of the next quarter following the preliminary examination. Students currently pursuing a master’s degree at the time of their preliminary examination should have a thesis advisor as soon as possible after being accepted as a Ph.D. student.

The student and the thesis advisor jointly develop a complete program of studies for research in a particular area. The complete program of studies (and any subsequent changes) must be filed with Engineering Graduate Programs and approved by the student’s doctoral committee. Until this approval is obtained, there is no guarantee that courses taken will be counted toward the Ph.D. course requirements.

Doctoral Committee
After passing the Ph.D. preliminary exam, a student requests his or her thesis advisor to form a doctoral committee. The committee consists of at least five members, each of which must have earned a doctoral degree in a field of engineering or a related discipline. This includes the student’s thesis advisor, at least two other current faculty members of the student’s major department at Santa Clara University, and at least one current faculty member from another appropriate academic department at Santa Clara University. The committee reviews the student’s program of study, conducts an oral comprehensive exam, conducts the dissertation defense, and reviews the thesis. Successful completion of the doctoral program requires that the student’s program of study, performance on the oral comprehensive examination, dissertation defense, and thesis itself meet with the approval of all committee members.

Residence
The Ph.D. degree is granted on the basis of academic achievement. The student is expected to complete a minimum of 72 units of graduate credit beyond the master’s degree with an overall GPA of 3.0 or better. Please note: Only classes with assigned grades of C- or higher will count toward the completion of the certificates, M.S. or Ph.D. degrees. Of these, 36 quarter units may be earned through coursework, independent study and directed research, and 36 through the thesis. Deviation from this distribution must be approved by the student’s doctoral committee and must not be more than six units. All Ph.D. thesis units are graded on a Pass/No Pass basis. A maximum of 18 quarter units (12 semester units), not previously used for the completion of another degree, may be transferred from any accredited institutions at the discretion of the student’s advisor.

Comprehensive Examinations and Admission to Candidacy
After completion of the formal coursework approved by the doctoral committee, the student shall present his/her research proposal for comprehensive oral examinations on the subject of his/her research work. The student should make arrangements for the comprehensive examinations through the doctoral committee. A student who passes the comprehensive examinations is considered a degree candidate.

The comprehensive examinations normally must be completed within four years from the time the student is admitted to the doctoral program. These examinations may be repeated once, in whole or in part, at the discretion of the doctoral committee.

Thesis Research and Defense
The period following the comprehensive examinations is devoted to research for the thesis, although such research may begin before the examinations are complete. After successfully completing the comprehensive examinations, the student must pass an oral examination on his/her research, conducted by the doctoral committee and whomever they appoint as examiners. The thesis must be made available to all examiners one month prior to the examination. The oral examination shall consist of a presentation of the results of the thesis and the defense. This examination is open to all faculty members of Santa Clara University, but only members of the doctoral committee have a vote.

Thesis and Publication
At least one month before the degree is conferred, the candidate must submit one copy of the final version of the thesis to the department and one copy to the Orradre Library. The thesis will not be considered as accepted until approved by the doctoral committee and one or more refereed articles based on it are accepted for publication in a professional or scientific journal approved by the doctoral committee. The quality of the refereed journal must be satisfied by one of two criteria: (1) the refereed journal should have an impact factor of at least 1.0; or (2) prior to submitting the candidate’s work to a refereed journal, written approvals on satisfying the journal’s quality should be obtained from the candidate’s advisor, the doctoral committee, the department chair, and the dean’s office. This written approval must be kept in the candidate’s file.

All doctoral theses must also be reproduced on microfilm by University Microfilms International, which keeps on deposit the master microfilm copy and responds to requests for copies by individuals and libraries.

Time Limit for Completing Degrees
All requirements for the doctoral degree must be completed within eight years following initial enrollment in the Ph.D. program. Extensions will be allowed only in unusual circumstances and must be recommended in writing by the student’s doctoral committee, and approved by the dean of engineering in consultation with the Graduate Program Leadership Council.

Non-Enrollment Period
Ph.D. students are expected to enroll in at least one unit for the fall, winter and spring quarters. Those who do not wish to do so must submit a leave of absence form or a withdrawal form to the Graduate Services office. A leave of absence form is required if a student plans to miss one or two quarters, while any longer absence requires a withdrawal form. Students who wish to resume their Ph.D. studies after withdrawing from the program must apply for readmission, and obtain the signatures of their academic advisor and the department chair.

Students are required to complete their degree within eight years from their original admit term date. The eight year time frame includes quarters during which a student was not enrolled. Those who fail to complete their Ph.D. in eight years can request an extension only under special circumstances. In such cases, the student’s advisor will need to discuss the case with the Graduate Program Leadership Council, which will determine whether an extension is warranted (and for how long).

Note: Students who miss one or more quarters and fail to submit the appropriate form(s) will be discontinued automatically, and will have to reapply to the Ph.D. program. They will need to follow the same procedure as students who withdrew from the program

Additional Graduation Requirements
The requirements for the doctoral degree in the School of Engineering have been made to establish the structure in which the degree may be earned. The student’s Ph.D. committee looks at the proposed research and the prior background of the student to determine whether or not there are specific courses that must be added as requirements. The University reserves the right to evaluate the undertakings and the accomplishments of the degree candidate in total and award or withhold the degree as a result of its deliberations.

In addition to our regular Ph.D. program, Engineering Graduate Programs also offer an “industrial track” for working professionals as an option to facilitate the collaboration between academia and industry. Details are as follows:

  1. The topic of the research should be coordinated with the needs of the candidate’s employer, and must be agreed upon by all parties. This topic must have a component that is publishable, and is presentable in open forums. If necessary, a collaborative research agreement will be enacted to indicate the rights of the School and the industrial partner.
  2. As a part of the application process, candidates must submit a letter of support from their employer. This letter should contain a pledge of financial support, and must identify a co-advisor within the company. The co-advisor shares responsibilities for guiding the candidate’s research with a full-time faculty advisor. This person is also expected to be a member of the doctoral committee.
  3. The full-time study component of the residence requirement is waived, but other residence requirements remain the same. Students who opt for this “industrial track” are responsible for meeting all other requirements for the Ph.D. The awarded degree will be the same for all students, regardless of the track that they choose to pursue.

Engineers who wish to update their skills or learn new technologies without pursuing a specific degree may enroll in the School of Engineering’s Open University program.

If a student from the Open University program is accepted into a degree program, a maximum of 16 units may apply toward the degree (if the courses are in the same discipline to which the student is accepted). The general GRE test requirement for admission to the master’s degree program will be waived if the student has completed a set of required courses in the department to which they are applying, and has earned a GPA of 3.5 or higher. A list of these courses can be found on the Graduate Engineering website.

Open University students who are considering enrolling in the master’s program should be aware that each specialization has its own set of requirements, and that the number of “free electives” is very limited. Such students are therefore strongly encouraged to choose their classes in consultation with a faculty advisor from the very beginning.

Students should remember, however, that all coursework taken at SCU, whether as a degree-seeking or an Open University student becomes a part of the student’s academic history.

Please Note: Santa Clara University does not issue F-1 visas to applicants who wish to enter directly into this program.

Admissions

Applications for admission and related deadlines are available on the School of Engineering website.

Certificate Programs
Depending on the certificate, students will complete 16-18 units of coursework. Applicants for admission to the certificate programs must submit the following materials:

  • A completed online Application for Admission to Engineering Graduate Programs, including a nonrefundable $60 application fee
  • One official transcript from each academic institution attended, indicating the degree received and date of conferral

Please note that all applicants with degrees from universities outside of the United States must also submit a transcript evaluation report from Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) or World Education Services (WES). The report must include a course by course evaluation which will verify a GPA (based on a 4.0 scale), and the U.S. equivalence of each educational credential. For additional information, please refer to the ECE or WES website. (There is no exception to this requirement.)

Also please note that GRE and TOEFL scores are not required for admission. Certificate programs are not appropriate for international students, who must pursue full-time study.

All certificate units in the discipline may be applied toward a master’s degree. Students who wish to pursue such a degree must submit a separate online application and satisfy all normal admission requirements. The application fee will be waived for currently enrolled certificate students. The general GRE and TOEFL test requirement for graduate admission to the master’s degree will be waived for students who complete a certificate with a GPA of 3.5 or higher.

Please Note: Santa Clara University does not issue F-1 visas to applicants who wish to enter directly into this program.

Master of Science Degrees
Domestic applicants for admission to the master’s programs must submit the following materials:

  • A completed online Application for Admission to Engineering Graduate Programs, including a nonrefundable $60 application fee
  • One official transcript from each academic institution attended, indicating the degree received and date of conferral
  • Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, which must be sent directly to Engineering Graduate Programs by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). Our institution code is 4851. For information on the GRE, please visit the website.

Please Note: Students applying to the M.S. program in Applied Mathematics, Computer Science and Engineering, Software Engineering and Mechanical Engineering may petition to waive the GRE requirement by completing the Petition to Waive GRE Requirement form. However, applicants must be aware that there is no guarantee that the waiver will be granted.

This option is also available tscuo applicants for the Engineering Management Program who have two or more years of working experience in the U.S. These students will also complete the Petition to Waive GRE Requirement form, as indicated above.

International applicants for admission to the master’s programs must submit the following materials:

  • A completed online Application for Admission to Engineering Graduate Programs, including a nonrefundable $60 application fee
  • One official transcript from each academic institution attended, indicating the degree received and date of conferral. All applicants with degrees from universities outside of the United States must submit a transcript evaluation report from Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) or World Education Services (WES). The report must include a course by course evaluation which will verify a GPA based on a 4.0 scale, and the U.S. equivalence of each educational credential. Please refer to the ECE or WES website. (There is no exception to this requirement.)
  • Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores, which must be sent directly to Engineering Graduate Programs by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). Our institution code is 4851. For information on the GRE, please visit the website.

Please Note: Students applying to the M.S. program in Applied Mathematics or in Mechanical Engineering may petition to waive the GRE requirement by completing the Petition to Waive GRE Requirement form. However, applicants must be aware that there is no guarantee that the waiver will be granted. The department of Computer Engineering DOES NOT accept GRE waiver.

This option is also available to applicants for the Engineering Management Program who have two or more years of working experience in the U.S. These students will also complete the Petition to Waive GRE Requirement form, as indicated above.

  • Scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing Systems (IELTS) exam (applies to non-U.S. citizens or those students who have received a degree from a university outside of the United States). Our institution code is 4851. Test scores over three years old will not be accepted.

Ph.D. and Engineer’s Degrees
Ph.D. and Engineer’s degrees are offered in the departments of Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering.

Domestic applicants must submit the following materials:

  • A completed online Application for Admission to Engineering Graduate Programs, including a nonrefundable $60 application fee
  • A 500-word statement of purpose emphasizing the applicant’s research interests and outlining the applicant’s professional and academic goals, which must be included with the online application
  • One official transcript from each academic institution attended, indicating the degree received and date of conferral
  • Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores must be sent directly to Engineering Graduate Programs by the Educational Testing Service (ET). Our institution code is 4851. For further information on the GRE, please visit the website.
  • Three letters of recommendation are required. These letters should attest to the applicant’s academic preparation and capability for advanced studies. (There are no standard recommendation forms.) Please send signed and sealed letters with other supporting documents in one envelope to: Engineering Graduate Admissions, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053.

International applicants must submit the following materials:

  • A completed online Application for Admission to Engineering Graduate Programs, including a nonrefundable $60 application fee
  • A 500-word statement of purpose emphasizing the applicant’s research interests and outlining the applicant’s professional and academic goals, which must be included with the online application
  • One official transcript from each academic institution attended, indicating the degree received and date of conferral. All applicants with degrees from universities outside of the United States must submit a transcript evaluation report from Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) or World Education Services (WES). The report must include a course by course evaluation which will verify a GPA based on a 4.0 scale, and the U.S. equivalence of each educational credential. Please refer to the ECE or WES website. (There is no exception to this requirement.)
  • Scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing Systems (IELTS) exam (applies to non-U.S. citizens or those students who have received a degree from a university outside of the United States). Our institution code is 4851. Test scores over three years old will not be accepted.
  • Official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores must be sent directly to Engineering Graduate Programs by the Educational Testing Service (ETS). Our institution code is 4851. For further information on the GRE, please visit the website.
  • Three letters of recommendation are required. These letters should attest to the applicant’s academic preparation and capability for advanced studies. (There are no standard recommendation forms.) Please send signed and sealed letters with other supporting documents in one envelope to: Engineering Graduate Admissions, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053.

Any student who has been admitted to a degree program and wishes to defer that admission must submit a request, in writing, to the Engineering Graduate Programs Admissions Office prior to the beginning of the quarter.

For those who want to update their skills and learn new technologies without the commitment of earning a graduate degree, Open University allows students to enroll in graduate-level classes. Individuals who have applied to a degree program can get a head start by enrolling in classes while they wait for admission to a degree program.

For admission, applicants must submit the following materials:

  • A completed online Application for Admission to Engineering Graduate Programs, including a nonrefundable $60 application fee
  • Official transcript from every university attended* to:

    Engineering Graduate Programs
    School of Engineering
    Santa Clara University
    500 El Camino Real
    Santa Clara, CA 95053-0583
    E-mail: GradEngineer@scu.edu
    Phone: 408-554-4313
    Fax: 408-554-4323

*Please Note: All applicants with degrees from universities outside of the United States must also submit a transcript evaluation report from Educational Credential Evaluators (ECE) or World Education Services (WES). The report must include a course-by-course evaluation which verify a GPA (based on a 4.0 scale), and the U.S. equivalence of each educational credential.

For additional information, please refer to the ECE or WES websites. (There is no exception to this requirement.)

If students wish to apply to a degree program at a later date, they must follow the same procedure, and submit the same supporting documentation required of degree-seeking applicants, except that the application fee is waived. A maximum of 16 units may apply toward the degree if the courses are in the same discipline to which the student is accepted. The general GRE test requirement for admission to the master’s degree program will be waived if the student has completed a set of required courses in the department to which they are applying, and has earned a GPA of 3.5 or higher. A list of these courses can be found on the Graduate Engineering website .

Please Note: Santa Clara University does not issue F-1 visas to applicants who wish to enter directly into this program.

Please Note: Open University students are not eligible to enroll in undergraduate classes.

An application for readmission is required of students whose enrollment in the School of Engineering lapses for three consecutive quarters. Applicants for readmission must submit transcripts of the latest graduate work completed in other university programs, together with official transcripts of study completed elsewhere since their previous enrollment.

After successfully completing advanced degree requirements at Santa Clara University, a student must reapply if interested in taking graduate engineering courses. None of the courses used to satisfy requirements for the first degree can be applied to any other subsequent degree.

Academic Information

The Engineering Honor Code is a long-standing Santa Clara tradition. Instituted at the request of engineering students, the code states: All students taking courses in the School of Engineering agree, individually and collectively, that they will not give or receive unpermitted aid in examinations or other coursework that is to be used by the instructor as the basis of grading. Students and teachers cooperate and share responsibilities under the code. Teachers are responsible for making clear what aid is permissible and for using procedures that minimize temptations to violate the code. Students are responsible for behaving honorably, for actively ensuring that others as well as themselves uphold the code, and for being responsive to violations. Students dominate the administration of the code, and they take full responsibility for trying cases of alleged violations and for recommending penalties. Alleged violations should be reported to the Office of the Dean.

The Graduate Core is a set of requirements that is common to all departments in the School of Engineering. The Core promotes an educational philosophy that goes far beyond narrow specialization and emphasizes a global and societal orientation. It also reflects the fact that we live in an increasingly complex world, in which engineers must continually deepen their understanding of the interdisciplinary environment in which they operate.

Students will be required to take a course in each of the following three areas of the Core (for a minimum of 6 units):

  1. Emerging Topics in Engineering
  2. Engineering and Business/Entrepreneurship
  3. Engineering and Society

The following courses are currently approved for this purpose (students are encouraged to periodically check the graduate engineering website for updates regarding new courses in these areas. No substitutions will be approved.).

Emerging Topics in Engineering

  • AMTH 308 Theory of Wavelets
  • AMTH 351 Quantum Computing
  • AMTH 367 Mathematical Finance
  • AMTH 387 Cryptology
  • BIOE 256/ENGR 256 Introduction to Nanobioengineering
  • CENG 213 Sustainable Materials
  • CENG 215 Sustainable Structural Engineering
  • CENG 219 Designing for Sustainable Construction
  • CENG 282 Introduction to Building Information Modeling
  • ELEN 280/MECH 287 Introduction to Alternative Energy Systems
  • ELEN 285 Introduction to the Smart Grid
  • ENGR 260 Nanoscale Science and Technology
  • ENGR 262 Nanomaterials
  • ENGR 273 Sustainable Energy and Ethics
  • ENGR 337 Sustainability and Green Information Technology
  • ENGR 371/MECH 371 Space Systems Design and Engineering I
  • ENGR 372 Space Systems Design and Engineering II
  • MECH 234 Combustion Technology
  • MECH 268 Computational Fluid Dynamics I
  • MECH 295 Fire Dynamics (Special Topic)

Engineering and Business/Entrepreneurship

  • AMTH 367 Mathematical Finance
  • CENG 208 Engineering and Project Finance
  • CENG 282 Infrastructure Project Management
  • COEN 287 Software Development Process Management
  • ENGR 302 Managing in the Multicultural Environment
  • ENGR 304 Building Global Teams
  • ENGR 336 Engineering for the Developing World
  • ENGR 338 Mobile Applications for Emerging Markets

This requirement can also be satisfied by taking any 2-unit course in Engineering
Management (EMGT)

Engineering and Society

  • BIOE 210 Ethical Issues in Bioengineering
  • CENG 208 Engineering Economics and Project Finance
  • COEN 250 Information Security Management
  • COEN 288 Software Ethics
  • ELEN 217 Chaos Theory, Metamathematics, and the Limits of Science:
    An Engineering Perspective on Religion
  • ENGR 261 Nanotechnology and Society
  • ENGR 272 Energy Public Policy
  • ENGR 273 Sustainable Energy and Ethics
  • ENGR 302 Managing in the Multicultural Environment
  • ENGR 303 Gender and Engineering
  • ENGR 304 Building Global Teams
  • ENGR 306 Engineering and the Law
  • ENGR 310 Engineering Ethics
  • ENGR 330 Law, Technology, and Intellectual Property
  • ENGR 334 Energy, Climate Change, and Social Justice
  • ENGR 336 Engineering for the Developing World
  • ENGR 340 Distributed & Renewable Energy for the Developing World
  • ENGR 341 Innovation, Design and Spirituality
  • ENGR 342 3D Print Technology and Society
  • ENGR 343 Science, Religion and the Limits of Knowledge
  • ENGR 349 Topics in Frugal Engineering

Note 1: Although certain courses (such as ENGR 302, ENGR 304, ENGR 336, and AMTH 367 for example) may appear in multiple categories, they cannot be used to satisfy more than one Core requirement. Students are encouraged to periodically check the graduate engineering website for updates regarding new courses in these areas,

Note 2: Core requirements cannot be waived, and no substitutions will be approved.

Classes are taught in the following timeslots: 7:10-9:00 a.m., 5:10-7:00 p.m., and 7:10-9:00 p.m., Monday through Friday with some Saturday and/or Sunday offerings; 2-unit courses meet one day per week, and four unit courses meet two days per week. All students are expected to attend the first class meeting of the quarter. Failure to do so can result an academic withdrawal from the course.

Only courses in which the student has earned assigned grades of A, B, or C, with plus (+) or minus (-) variations, may be counted for the master’s or Ph.D. degree. The student must earn a 3.0 average in the approved 45 units required for the completion of the M.S. degree or the approved 72 units required for the Ph.D. degree. Only credits, not grade points, are transferred from other institutions. A cumulative GPA of less than 2.6 after the completion of 16 units may result in dismissal from the graduate program.

Please note: Only classes with assigned grades of C- or higher will count toward the completion of the certificates, M.S. or Ph.D. degrees.

The grades A, B, C, and D may be modified by (+) or (-) suffixes, except that the grade of A may not be modified by a (+). Grade point values per unit are assigned as follows: A = 4.0; A- = 3.7; B+ = 3.3; B = 3.0; B- = 2.7; C+ = 2.3; C = 2; C- = 1.7; D+ = 1.3; D = 1.0; D- = 0.7. F= 0., I (incomplete), P (pass), NP (no pass), and W (withdrawn) are all assigned zero points. Unit credit, but not grade point credit, is awarded when the grade of P is assigned. The P (pass) and NP (no pass) options are not available in engineering management courses.

The University also uses the following marks: AUD (audit), I (incomplete), N (continuing work), NP (not passed), NS (no show), and W (withdrawn). No unit credit or grade point value is granted for any of these marks.

Please note: Only classes with assigned grades of C- or higher will count toward the completion of the certificates, M.S. or Ph.D. degrees.

Courses such as seminars (with the exception of COEN 400 and ELEN 200), Co-ops, etc., are limited to a total of five units and must be approved by the student’s advisor.

Please Note: Co-op units may not be used toward the completion of a degree.

A student’s work may be reported incomplete if due to illness or other serious circumstance some essential portion of the coursework remains unfinished after the final examination, or if the thesis has not been completed. An incomplete (I) becomes a failure (F) unless the unfinished work is completed to the satisfaction of the instructor and proper notice is filed with the registrar within four weeks from the beginning of the next scheduled quarter, not including summer session. Makeup work must be in the hands of the instructor no later than the end of the third week so that the instructor can meet the four-week submission deadline.

A student may take courses with a grading basis of “audit” but need to keep in mind the following:

  • The current graduate tuition rate of $970.00 per unit + the $150.00 engineering fee will be charged.
  • No grade points or credit will be earned so the class cannot be counted toward the completion of a certificate, M.S. or Ph.D.
  • A student will need to register for the class, then send an email to the Director of Records and Operations requesting that the grading basis be changed to “Audit”: lmjocewicz@scu.edu
  • The last day to request to audit a course is at the end of the first week of instruction.

A student may, with the permission of the department, repeat a course in which a grade of C or lower was received on the first attempt. All grades, whether received on the first or second attempt, will be used in computing overall student performance. The units from a course may be counted only once in fulfilling graduation requirements.

Students may change their course registration as stated in the Academic Calendar. Withdrawal from any course may be accomplished up to the 7th Friday of the term. After the fourth week of the quarter, a withdrawal will be recorded as W on the transcript. After the tenth Friday, an emergency that qualifies may be handled as an incomplete (I). Dropping a course without formal withdrawal will result in a grade of F. Deadlines are strictly adhered to and will result in loss of tuition refund.

During the first quarter of enrollment, a student whose objective is an M.S. degree should meet with a faculty advisor to discuss the program of studies and future coursework. The advisor-approved program of studies, including any transfer units, must be submitted to Engineering Graduate Programs Office before the end of the first quarter of enrollment. Variations from the approved program of studies may be made only with the written approval of the advisor and the filing of the proper forms.

A maximum of 16 quarter units earned in a SCU nondegree status and nine quarter units of graduate-level transfer credit from an accredited university may be applied toward graduation upon approval of the academic advisor. B.S./M.S. students can transfer up to 20 units from their undergraduate program as long as the course and units were not used toward their undergraduate degree.  All units and transfer credit must be included on the Program of Studies.

Please Note: Extension and continuing education units are not accepted for transfer.

M.S. students who have an undergraduate degree from Santa Clara University can transfer up to 12 units of eligible graduate level coursework into the program.

  • Only those courses completed with a C grade or better will be eligible for transfer.
  • The units may not have been used for another degree.
  • Since these courses were taken at SCU, the grades will count toward the overall grade point average.

All M.S. students have the option to transfer a maximum of six semester or nine quarter units of graduate level coursework from an accredited institution into their degree program with their advisor’s approval. All Ph.D. students have the option to transfer a maximum of 12 semester or 18 quarter units of graduate level coursework from an accredited institution into their degree program with their advisor’s approval. Please keep the following in mind when transferring units:

  • Only those courses completed with a C grade or better will be eligible for transfer.
  • Extension, continuing education, and online courses may not be transferred.
  • The units may not have been used for another degree.
  • Only the credit will transfer, but not grades so your overall grade point average will be based on coursework completed at Santa Clara University only.
  • An official transcript and course syllabus is required for verification of the units by the student’s advisor and Engineering Graduate Programs.

In order to transfer units into a degree program, please follow this procedure:

  • Include those units you wish to transfer in the “Transfer Credit” section of the Program of Studies form and include the Institution Name, Course Number and Name, Grade, Units* and Year. (*Please note that 1 semester unit is equivalent to 1.5 quarter units. Please put the quarter unit value on your Program of Studies so that the final total will be correct.)
  • Have your academic advisor sign the Program of Studies form and submit it to Engineering Graduate Programs.

It is a student’s responsibility to file a petition for graduation no later than the last day to petition for graduate degrees as indicated in the Academic Calendar. The petition to graduate will only be accepted through online submission and may be found on the website .

Please Note: Eligibility to participate in the June Commencement ceremony will be based on the completion of all requirements by the end of the spring quarter. If you still have units or a thesis to complete after the spring quarter, participation in the ceremony will be delayed until the following June.

The objective of cooperative education is to provide students with the opportunity, through the interaction of study and work experience, to enhance their academic knowledge, to further their personal work experience, and to learn about working with people. The Cooperative Education option integrates classroom work with practical industrial experience. It alternates or parallels periods of college education with periods of practical training in industry. The industrial training is related to the field of study in which the student is engaged and often is diversified to afford a wide range of experience. To qualify for this study option, students must complete at least 24 units at Santa Clara University. Interested students should contact the Cooperative Education Office in the Career Services Office early in their academic program.

International students who wish to pursue this option through curricular practical training (CPT) must enroll in ENGR 288. This class can be taken during the first quarter of CPT, or before the training begins. Those who plan to start (or continue) their CPT after they have taken ENGR 288 must enroll in ENGR 289 (which can be taken for credit up to four times).**

**Note 1: The units associated with ENGR 288 and ENGR 289 are additional to the units that are required by the department.

*** Note 2: ENGR 288 is not offered in the summer quarter.

Concurrent Enrollment means that a student is enrolled in two places at the same time. An international student at Santa Clara University may be given permission to engage in Concurrent Enrollment provided the student meets the following USCIS requirements:

  • Combined enrollment amounts to a full course of study
  • The student has been granted permission from a faculty advisor to enroll at another college (advisor must sign Concurrent Enrollment Form)
  • Must receive written approval from DSO at International Student Services
  • The student is making normal progress at Santa Clara and is not in danger of probation or disqualification
  • The coursework at the other school is NOT vocational and will be accepted for fulfilling degree requirements at SCU

For more information, please contact the International Student Services Office at 408-554-4318 or refer to the website.

Students in the Master’s program are expected to enroll in at least one unit for the fall, winter and spring quarters. Those who do not wish to do so must submit a leave of absence form or a withdrawal form to the Graduate Services office. A leave of absence form is required if a student plans to miss one or two quarters, while any longer absence requires a withdrawal form. Students who wish to resume their Master’s studies after withdrawing from the program must apply for readmission, and obtain the signatures of their academic advisor and the department chair.

Students are required to complete their degree within six years from their original admit term date. The six year time frame includes quarters during which a student was not enrolled. Note that students who miss one or more quarters and fail to submit the appropriate form(s) will be discontinued automatically, and will have to reapply to the Master’s program. They will need to follow the same procedure as students who withdrew from the program.

Withdrawal from the University is not officially complete until students clear all of their financial obligations with the Bursar’s Office. Students on deferments or a Federal Perkins Loan must also clear their financial obligations with the Credit Counseling Office.

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) protects the confidentiality of the University records of Santa Clara University students. A student is any person who attends or has attended a class, which includes courses taken through video conference, satellite, Internet, or other electronic telecommunication technologies, and for whom the institution maintains education records. The University is authorized under the provisions of the Act to release any directory information to any person on request, unless a student explicitly request in writing that the University not to so and keep directory information confidential. A student directory information is designated as follows:

  • Student’s Name
  • Address, campus post office box, local, and permanent addresses (residence hall and room number not disclosed)
  • Telephone number
  • Email address
  • Photograph
  • Date and place of birth
  • Major field of study
  • Classification level/academic standing
  • Dates of attendance (defined as academic year or quarter)
  • Participation in officially recognized activities and sports
  • Weight and height of members of athletic team
  • Degrees (including expected or actual degree date), honors and awards received, and dates)
  • Most recent educational agency or institution attended

During the registration period and throughout the academic year, students may request in writing, through the Office of the Registrar that directory information be kept confidential. Once filed, the request remains in effect until the beginning of the next academic year, or a shorter period, if designated by the student. Graduating students must notify the Office of the Registrar in writing to remove the nondisclosure notation from their record.

The University is authorized under FERPA to release educational and directory information to appropriate parties without consent if the University finds an articulable and significant threat to the health or safety of a student or other individuals in light of the information available at the time.

Former or current borrowers of funds from any Title IV student loan program should note carefully that requests for nondisclosure of information will not prevent the University from releasing information pertinent to employment, enrollment status, current address, and loan account status to a school lender, subsequent holder, guarantee agency, United States Department of Education, or an authorized agent.

Students have the right to inspect and review their educational records at the following offices:

  • Official academic records, including application forms, admissions transcripts, letters of acceptance, and a student’s permanent academic record are on file and maintained in the Office of the Registrar.
  • Working academic files are also maintained by the deans in their respective offices.
  • Records related to students’ nonacademic activities are maintained in the Office of Student Life.
  • Records relating to students’ financial status with the University are maintained in the various student financial services offices.

Certain records are excluded by the law from inspection, specifically those created or maintained by a physician, psychiatrist, or psychologist in connection with the treatment or counseling of a student. Parents’ financial information, including statements submitted with scholarship applications, is also excluded by law from inspection. Third parties may not have access to educational records or other information pertaining to students without the written consent of the particular student about whom the information is sought.

Students have the right to request the amendment of their educational records to ensure that they are not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy or other rights. Students may direct complaints regarding academic records to the dean of the college or school in which they are enrolled or to the University Registrar. In addition, students have the right to file a complaint with the United States Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the University to comply with the requirements of the Act. Written complaints should be directed to the Family Policy Compliance Office, Department of Education, 400 Maryland Ave., S.W., Washington, D.C. 20202-5920. For further information regarding Santa Clara University’s FERPA policy please refer to www.scu.edu/ferpa/scu-ferpa-policy/

The U.S. Department of Education requires universities that receive Title IV funding to disclose certain information, including institutional graduation rates, athlete graduation rates, financial assistance awarded, and crime statistics. Information presented in compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act is made available to assist current and potential students and employees in making informed decisions regarding their attendance or employment with Santa Clara University. To view the Santa Clara University reports, please refer to the Campus Safety Services website .

A paper copy of the report may be obtained by writing to Campus Safety Services, Santa Clara University, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053.

Financial Information

Students assume responsibility for all costs incurred as a result of enrollment at Santa Clara University.  It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of their account balance and financial aid information and maintain current valid contact information at all times to ensure receipt of all University correspondence in a timely manner. All major correspondence is sent using the University’s official gmail account. Students are responsible to check their Santa Clara gmail for important information and updates.

Students are required to accept the financial terms and conditions outlined by the University in order to continue their enrollment at SCU. Students will be prompted to accept the terms and conditions, on an annual basis, upon their login to ecampus. Students will not have access to their Student Center until they have read and agreed to the information contained on the page(s) prompted. By accepting SCU’s financial terms and conditions, students are agreeing to pay for services rendered by the University and to abide by all policies and procedures as published.

Tuition, per quarter unit, for all courses $970
Graduate Design Center and Student Association (AGES) fee $150

Per quarter, for each student enrolled in School of Engineering courses; includes Association of Graduate Engineering Students (AGES) fee.

Annual international student health insurance fee $2968

Santa Clara University requires all students taking two or more classes to have health insurance. Students may either enroll in the University-sponsored health insurance plan or complete the online waiver form each academic year with the student’s own health insurance information. For details on completing the waiver or on-line insurance enrollment option go here and click on Student Health Insurance.

Graduate students who have medical insurance other than the University-sponsored plan will be billed a $90 health center fee for each quarter they visit the Cowell Health Center. Graduate students enrolled in the University plan may use the health center at any time. The health center fee is included in the cost of the insurance premium.

Non-refundable application fee, per application $60
Non-refundable Enrollment Deposit (will be credited toward student’s account once enrollment is posted) $300
Late registration fee $100
Course drop/swap fee (per course) $50
Late payment fee $100
Ph.D. thesis microfilming $45
Parking permits (per year) $375
Parking permits (N permit)after 4:30p.m. only (per year) $190

 

Students assume responsibility for all costs incurred as a result of enrollment at Santa Clara University and agree to abide by applicable University policies and procedures. Students may designate a third party (e.g., parent, family member, spouse) to be an authorized user for the purpose of reviewing student account/billing information and remitting payment on the student’s behalf. However, it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to make sure all financial obligations are completed by the published deadlines.

Students receive monthly bills electronically via a third-party vendor that are accessible through University e-campus. A billing notification will be sent to the student’s assigned SCU gmail account and to the email address of any authorized user. Students may also forward their billing statements electronically to any third party they authorize for remittance. Information on a student’s account cannot be provided to any third party payer unless a completed Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) form authorizing its release by the student is on file with the University.

Students are obligated to pay the applicable tuition and fees associated with their enrollment status by the published term payment deadline. Students enrolling after the initial payment deadline may be required to pre-pay for their enrollment. Registered students who do not withdraw formally from the University are responsible for all tuition and fees assessed to their account as well as any penalty charges incurred for nonpayment. Nonattendance does not relieve the student of his or her obligation to pay tuition and fees.

More helpful information, including detailed instructions on Santa Clara’s billing and payment procedures, is located at the website: www.scu.edu/bursar.

Graduate Programs Billing Dates and Deadlines
The following dates are the initial payment deadlines for each quarter:

Fall 2017 Billing available August 1; payment due August 21
Winter 2018 Billing available December 1; payment due December 21
Spring 2018 Billing available March 1; payment due March 21
Summer 2018 Billing available May 1; payment due May 21

Santa Clara University offers the following payment methods to assist students with their financial obligations:

Payment by Electronic Check
A student or authorized user may make online payments by authorizing a fund transfer directly from his/her personal checking or savings account through the SCU pay system. Students will login to eCampus to complete their transaction; authorized users will login to a separate URL provided at the time their access is created.

Payment by Mail
Payment by personal or cashier’s check for student account charges should be mailed to: SCU Payment Processing, PO Box 550, Santa Clara, CA. 95052-0550. It is extremely important to include a copy of the student’s billing statement to ensure accurate and timely posting.

Payment in Person
Payments for student account charges may be made in person by personal/cashier’s check, money order or cash at the Enrollment Service Center in the Admissions & Enrollment Services Building. The University is not able to accept any electronic form of payment, including debit or credit cards. However, there are computer kiosks located in the Enrollment Services Center for the convenience of students and payers who wish to make electronic payments.

International Payment by Wire Transfer
International students may submit payment quickly and securely by going to www.flywire.com/pay/scu. Students are able to benefit from excellent exchange rates and payment can usually be made in the student’s home currency.

For students wishing to spread payments over a period of time the University offers term payment plans, which are available through the online billing system via eCampus. There is a modest fixed fee to enroll in these plans, but no interest is charged during the payment term. Information about these plans is available on the bursar’s office website: www.scu.edu/bursar

If all charges on a student’s account have not been cleared by payment, financial aid, or loan disbursement, a late payment fee will be assessed to the student’s account and a hold will be placed on the student’s record. A hold on a student’s record prevents the release of transcripts or diplomas, access to any registration services, and may limit access to other University services. Students who have unpaid accounts at the University or who defer payment without approval are subject to dismissal from the University. All unpaid balances will accrue ten percent interest per annum on the balance remaining from the date of default in accordance with California state law.

Delinquent student accounts may be reported to one or more of the major credit bureaus and may be forwarded to an outside collection agency or an attorney for assistance in recovering the debt owed to the University. The student is responsible for all costs incurred to collect outstanding debt, including but not limited to accrued interest, late fees, court costs, collection fees, and attorney fees. All outstanding bills and costs of collection incurred by the University must be paid in full prior to a student re-enrolling at the University.

If a student believes there is an error on his or her billing statement, a written explanation should be forwarded to: Santa Clara University, Bursar’s Office, 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053-0615. The Bursar’s Office must receive written correspondence within 60 days from the billing statement date on which the error appeared. Communication can be made by telephone, but doing so will not preserve the student’s rights.

Communication should include the student’s name, SCU identification number, the amount in question, and a brief explanation. Payment for the amount in question is not required while the investigation is in progress. An adjustment will be made on the student’s account for any incorrect charges. If the amount in question is found to be valid, payment must be submitted to the Enrollment Services Center immediately upon notification.

Refunds will be granted only for student accounts reflecting a credit balance. A refund will not be granted based on anticipated aid. All financial aid must be disbursed into a student’s account before a refund is processed. It is the student’s responsibility to make sure that all necessary documentation is completed and submitted to the Financial Aid office so that aid can be disbursed properly and in a timely fashion. Payment received by personal check will have a 21-day hold before a refund can be issued; a 5-day hold for electronic check payments.

Fall, Winter, and Spring Quarters
Students who drop courses or withdraw from the University during fall, winter, or spring term will receive a tuition refund in accordance with the following:

  • By the end of the first week of classes – 100% tuition refund, less any applicable fees
  • By the end of the second week of classes – 50% tuition refund, less any applicable fees
  • By the end of the third week of classes – 25% tuition refund, less any applicable fee
  • After the third week of classes – zero tuition refund

Summer
Students who drop courses or withdraw from the university during the summer session term will receive a tuition refund in accordance with the following:

  • By the end of day of the second class meeting – 100% tuition, refund less any applicable fees
  • By the end of day of the third class meeting – 50% tuition, refund less any applicable fees

Saturday/Sunday Courses/Off Cycle Courses
Students enrolled in a weekend course in which the first class meeting is after the first week of the term must provide written notification, to their respective Records Office, of their intent to withdraw or drop any weekend/off cycle course(s). Failure to comply with this process will result in an irreversible forfeit of tuition.

The following refund schedule applies:

  • Students will receive a 100% tuition refund, less any applicable fees, if written notification is received by 5 p.m. on the Tuesday immediately following the first class meeting.
  • Students will receive a 50% tuition refund, less any applicable fees, if written notification is received by 5 p.m. on the Tuesday immediately following the second class meeting.

To receive tuition refunds from the Bursar’s Office, these course drops must be handled administratively. Students should NOT drop a weekend/off cycle course themselves through ecampus after the first week of the quarter.

Please Note: If you withdraw or drop below half-time status you may no longer be eligible to receive financial aid or student loans. Your account will be adjusted accordingly and the aid returned to the appropriate program. If you have received a refund for these funds, you must reimburse Santa Clara University immediately. For more information on financial aid forfeiture, please visit the Financial Aid website or make an appointment with your financial aid counselor.

One-Unit Courses
Students enrolled in a one-unit course must provide written notification to their respective Records Office of their intent to withdraw or drop any course(s). Failure to comply with this process will result in an irreversible forfeit of tuition

The following refund schedule applies:

  • Students will receive a 100% tuition refund, less any applicable fees, if written notification is received within two business days prior to the first class meeting.
  • Students will receive 50% tuition refund, less any applicable fees, after the first class meeting unless the course has only one session, in which case no refund will be granted.

Financial Hardship
Students who withdraw from the University or drop courses due to an illness, injury, or psychological/emotional condition are eligible for a tuition refund in accordance with the schedule above. Tuition insurance may be purchased to cover tuition charges for medically related withdrawals that occur after the first week of the term.

Santa Clara University degree students who withdraw from the University or who are administratively withdrawn from the University after the third week of the term due to a qualifying financial hardship may be eligible for an allocation from the student hardship fund for 25 percent of the tuition charges for that term. Qualifying financial hardships include: (1) death, disabling injury, medical emergency, (2) loss of job by an independent student, (3) medical or other emergency involving a dependent of an independent student, and (4) student deployment for active military duty. The Vice Provost for Student Life or designee, in consultation with the Financial Aid Office, will determine qualifying financial hardships and any allocation from the student hardship fund. Students must submit a request for an allocation from the student hardship fund by the end of the applicable term.

No tuition refunds are made because of curtailed services resulting from strikes, acts of God, civil insurrection, riots or threats thereof, or other causes beyond the control of the University.

Students and families may protect themselves against financial loss due to unexpected withdrawal from the University for medical reasons by purchasing tuition insurance coverage. The University has identified an insurance company, A.W.G. Dewar Inc., to provide an optional insurance protection plan. This plan is designed to protect from loss of funds paid for tuition should it be necessary to withdraw completely from the University during the term for medical reasons. Information on the tuition insurance plan is available from the Bursar’s Office and on it’s website.

Students may be eligible for a higher education tax credit designed to help students and their parents finance the cost of education. Tax credits are based on the amount of qualified tuition and fees, less grants and other tax-free educational assistance, and the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income. Students enrolled in an eligible degree program may qualify for a Hope Scholarship Credit or Lifetime Learning Tax Credit. Specific information is available from the Internal Revenue Service.

Students must be enrolled at least part-time status (4 units) to receive Federal financial aid.

California State Graduate Fellowships
State graduate fellowships are awarded to California residents pursuing a recognized graduate or professional degree who intend to pursue teaching as a career and who have not completed more than four quarters of full-time graduate work as of October 1. Selection is based on state manpower needs, academic performance, and financial need. Applicants should apply using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is available at website: www.fafsa.ed.gov/.

Loans
Students applying for aid may find the most advantageous method of financing their education through loan programs. Among those available to students of the School of Engineering are the Federal Perkins Loan and Federal Stafford Loans through the School as Lender Program. Applicants should apply using the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is available at website: www.fafsa.ed.gov/.

Please Note: A student must be a U.S. citizen or eligible non-citizen to qualify for federal sources of financial assistance.

Deadlines
The Financial Aid Office has established deadlines for consideration of the various programs it administers. All students requesting financial aid from the University should contact the Financial Aid Office at the earliest possible date to request specific deadline information and appropriate application materials. Files completed later than February 1 for new recipients and March 2 for current recipients will receive consideration on a funds-available basis. All financial aid deadlines are posted on the Financial Aid website: www.scu.edu/financialaid.

Veterans and Veterans’ Dependents Assistance
Santa Clara University has been certified by the Department of Veterans Affairs as qualified to enroll students under applicable federal legislation and regulations, including Chapter 35 (child of a deceased or 100 percent disabled veteran, widow of any person who died in the service or died of a service-connected disability, or wife of a veteran with a 100 percent service-connected disability), Chapter 31 (Rehabilitation), Chapter 30-1606 (Active Duty Montgomery G.I. Bill), Chapter 33(Post 9/11 G.I. Bill). Individuals interested in attending under any of the Veteran’s assistance should contact the Veterans Administration and the University Office of the Registrar.

Information regarding these programs may be obtained from the Santa Clara University’s VA representative, Laura Moreno in the Office of the Registrar.

Teaching and Research Assistantships
The School of Engineering offers a limited number of teaching and research assistantships providing up to eight units of tuition and, in some cases, a modest stipend. For further information, students are encouraged to contact the associate dean for graduate studies, their faculty advisor, or their academic department.

University-Awarded Aid
Individual graduate schools may grant their students a specific amount of financial aid, per term, in the form of Santa Clara University school scholarships. Once the amount has been determined by the school, the information is sent to the Financial Aid Office for processing. The Financial Aid Office awards the aid and sends an e-mail notification to the student’s SCU Groupwise e-mail address only, informing them of their financial aid package and/or any aid revision. Students will be able to see their school scholarship award on e-campus. The award amount will also appear as “anticipated aid” on the student’s account to alleviate the assessment of holds/late fees from the Bursar’s Office. Generally, financial aid is disbursed to the student’s account ten days before the start of classes each term. If eligible, the Bursar’s Office will issue refund checks to students reflecting credit balances during the first week of the term.

Cancellation of Financial Aid and Return of Funds
Students who withdraw from the University and who have federal financial aid are subject to the federal regulations applicable to the return of Title IV funds. These regulations assume that a student earns his or her financial aid based on the period of time he or she remains enrolled during a term. A student is obligated to return all unearned federal financial aid funds governed under Title IV.

Unearned financial aid is the amount of disbursed Title IV that exceeds the amount of Title IV aid earned in accordance with the federal guidelines. During the first 60 percent of the term, a student earns Title IV funds in direct proportion to the length of time he or she remains enrolled. That is, the percentage of time during the term that the student remains enrolled is the percentage of disbursable aid for that period that the student has earned.

A student who withdraws after the 60 percent point of the enrollment term earns all Title IV aid disbursed for the period. The amount of tuition and other charges owed by the student plays no role in determining the amount of Title IV funds to which a withdrawn student is entitled.

All funds must be returned to federal programs before funds are returned to state or University financial aid programs and/or the student. The return of funds allocation will be made in the following order for students who have received federal Title IV assistance:

  • Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loans (other than Direct PLUS Loans)
  • Subsidized Federal Direct Loans
  • Federal Perkins Loans
  • Federal Direct Grad PLUS Loans
  • Federal PELL Grants for which a return is required
  • Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants for which a return is required
  • TEACH Grants for which a return is required
  • Iraq and Afghanistan Grants for which a return is required.

Graduate Minor in Science, Technology, and Society (STS)

Program Advisor: Dr. Aleksandar Zecevic

PROGRAM DESCRIPTION

The graduate minor in science, technology, and society (STS) is designed to help students gain a deeper understanding of the influence that engineering has on society (and vice versa). Knowledge of this kind has become essential in an increasingly complex and interconnected world, in which purely technical expertise often needs to be supplemented by additional skills. In order to successfully operate in such an environment, engineers must (at the very least) have the ability to communicate clearly, function on interdisciplinary and diverse teams, and make ethically and socially responsible decisions. The minor consists of a Core and a set of electives, and entails a minimum of 12 units of coursework. It is open to all students who are pursuing a master’s degree in engineering, regardless of the specific program in which they are enrolled.

The need to develop such skills has been widely recognized in universities around the country, as witnessed by the growing emphasis on interdisciplinary studies in undergraduate engineering curricula. It is unusual, however, to encounter programs of this kind on the graduate level. Most traditional master’s programs still focus on specialized technical topics, and offer little insight into how practicing engineers might engage global challenges such as climate change, sustainability, or economic disparity (to name just a few).

The primary purpose of the STS minor is to offer graduate students an opportunity to examine some of these key social issues on an advanced level. The scope of the minor is broad, and includes topics that range from the social impact of new technologies, to applied ethics, sustainability, and religion. As such, it reflects an educational philosophy that goes well beyond narrow specialization and promotes a global and societal orientation. All the courses in this program have a distinctly interdisciplinary flavor, and are designed to develop creativity, innovation, and leadership.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The STS minor consists of a Core and a set of electives, and entails a minimum of 12 units of coursework. The Core courses cover four distinct thematic areas:

  • Social and Philosophical Issues in Science and Engineering
  • Engineering and Ethics
  • Science and Religion
  • Sustainability and Engineering

Students will be required to take courses in at least three of the Core areas outlined above (for a minimum of 6 units). The remaining units (up to a total of 12, or more if desired) can be accumulated by taking a combination of electives and additional STS Core courses.

The courses and the different thematic areas to which they belong are listed below. Note that courses that appear in multiple areas can be used to satisfy only one Core requirement (in other words, no “double dipping” is allowed).

  • ENGR 261 Nanotechnology and Societ
  • ENGR 272 Energy Public Polic
  • ENGR 302 Managing in the Multicultural Environment
  • ENGR 303 Gender and Engineering
  • ENGR 304 Building Global Teams
  • ENGR 336 Engineering for the Developing World
  • ENGR 338 Mobile Applications for Emerging Markets
  • ENGR 341 Innovation, Design and Spiritualit
  • ENGR 342 3D Print Technology and Society<
  • COEN 288 Software Ethics
  • ENGR 273 Sustainable Energy and Ethics
  • ENGR 310 Engineering Ethics
  • ENGR 334 Energy, Climate Change, and Social Justice
  • ELEN 217 Chaos Theory, Metamathematics and the Limits of Knowledge: A Scientific Perspective on Religion
  • ENGR 334 Energy, Climate Change, and Social Justice
  • ENGR 341 Innovation, Design and Spirituality
  • ENGR 271 Energy Conservation
  • ENGR 272 Energy Public Polic
  • ENGR 273 Sustainable Energy and Ethics
  • ELEN 280/MECH 287 Introduction to Alternative Energy Systems
  • ELEN 288/COEN 282 Energy Management Systems
  • ENGR 334 Energy, Climate Change, and Social Justice
  • ENGR 337 Sustainability and Green Information Technolog
  • ENGR 340 Distributed and Renewable Energy for the Developing World
  • ENGR 349 Topics in Frugal Engineering

The STS minor option is open to all master’s students in the School of Engineering. Those who wish to pursue this minor must submit an application form to the Graduate Services Office by the end of their third quarter at SCU (at the latest), and must have their program of studies approved by the academic advisor for this program (Dr. Aleksander Zecevic). Links to the application form and the program of studies form can be found at the website.

Students who complete all the technical requirements set by their department, as well as an approved set of STS classes, will receive a master’s degree with a minor in science technology and society. The degree will be conferred by the department to which the student was originally accepted. Please note that the grades obtained in STS courses will be included in the overall GPA, and will carry the same weight as grades obtained in technical classes.

There are no financial or academic penalties for not completing the minor. Such students will receive the standard master’s degree, with no reference to the STS minor.

Students who have declared a graduate minor in Science, Technology, and Society (STS) are eligible for a special form of financial aid. The amount of aid is limited to 75% of tuition for up to 12 units (excluding fees). These funds can be applied only to courses taken beyond the 45 units that are required for a Master’s degree.

In order to become eligible for this benefit, students must check the appropriate box that pertains to financial aid on the application form. In addition, their program of studies must be approved by the academic advisor for the program (Dr. Aleksandar Zecevic). Financial aid comes into effect once a student completes 45 units of course work, at which point he or she should follow the procedure outlined below:

  1. The quarterly tuition must be paid in full, and in the time frame specified by the Bursar’s Office.
  2. In the second week of each quarter, students must provide the program academic advisor with a list of courses in which they are currently enrolled (this will require official proof of registration).
  3. Once the academic advisor establishes that the courses conform to the approved programs of studies (both in the technical and in the STS area), students will receive financial aid in the amount of 75% of their tuition expenses for that quarter (excluding fees).

Certificate Programs

Certificate programs are designed to provide intensive background in a narrow area at the graduate level. At approximately one-third of the units required for a master’s degree, the certificate is designed to be completed in a much shorter period of time. These certificate programs are appropriate for students working in industry who wish to update their skills or for those interested in changing their career path.

Certificate in Frugal Innovation
Advisors: Dr. Aleksandar Zecevic, Radha Basu

Over the past two decades, global trends have been forcing businesses to adapt to growing consumer bases in Africa, Asia and Latin America, which are in desperate need of low-cost and high-quality solutions to the challenges that they face. The importance of these new “economic realities” is underscored by the fact that emerging markets are expected to exceed 50% of the world’s GDP by 2017 (according to IMF estimates). In order to excel professionally in such an environment, engineers will have to be equipped with the knowledge and skillsets to appropriately define, design, and implement solutions that are not merely a “stripping down” of Western products to meet the rising demand. Industry, particularly in the Silicon Valley, is becoming increasingly aware of this fact, and has begun to move toward a ‘Triple Bottom Line’ approach to business, which integrates environmental, societal and financial considerations. The Certificate in Frugal Innovation is designed to give students the ability and the tools to adapt to this new model, and to expand their understanding of the impact that engineering has on society.

This program is suitable for working professionals in a wide variety of engineering disciplines. To enroll, students must have a B.S in Engineering from an accredited institution, and should maintain a GPA of at least 3.0 in order to receive the certificate.

Program Requirements
The Certificate in Frugal Innovation entails a minimum of 16 units of course work. It consists of an eight unit Core, and a set of electives that are organized into two groups. Students are required to take four units from Group A and another four from Group B, as described below.

Required Core Classes (8 units)

  • ENGR 336 Engineering for the Developing World (2 units)
  • ENGR 338 Mobile Applications and Instrumentation for Emerging Markets (2 units)
  • ENGR 340 Distributed and Renewable Energy for the Developing World (2 units)
  • ENGR 341 Innovation, Design and Spirituality (2 units)

Elective Group A (4 units)

  • ENGR 273 Sustainable Energy and Ethics (2 units)
  • ENGR 304 Building Global Teams (2 units)
  • ENGR 342 3D Print Technology and Society (2 units)
  • ENGR 349 Special Topics in Frugal Engineering (2 units)

Elective Group B (4 units)

  • CENG 219 Designing for Sustainable Construction (4 units)
  • COEN 389 Energy Efficient Computing (2 units)
  • ELEN 280/MECH 287 Introduction to Alternative Energy Systems (2 units)
  • ELEN 288/COEN 282 Energy Management Systems (2 units)
  • ENGR 302 Managing in the Multicultural Environment (2 units)
  • ENGR 334 Energy, Climate Change and Social Justice (2 units)

Renewable Energy Certificate
Advisor: Dr. Samiha Mourad

Renewable energy is the fastest-growing sector in California and brings together principles and practices from engineering, environmental science, and economics. Silicon Valley, the home of the world’s largest cluster of renewable energy companies and green investors, offers fertile ground to recruit career changers who wish to move into renewable energy and students who want to take advantage of the tremendous career opportunities.

The main goal of this certificate is to introduce students to the field of renewable energy. The intent is to help equip professionals in Silicon Valley with the knowledge that will help them advance in their present career or enter the renewable energy field. To enroll in this certificate an applicant should have a B.S. in Engineering from an accredited school and should maintain a grade point average of 3.0. As with most certificates in the Graduate School of Engineering, the requirement is 17 quarter units. Nine of these units are in Power Systems, four units are in Renewable Energy, with the remaining four units in Sustainability as shown below.

Required Courses (17 units total)
Power Systems (9 unites)

  • ELEN 280/MECH 287 Renewable Energy (2 units)
  • ELEN 281A Power Systems: Generation ( 3 units)
  • ELEN 285 Introduction to the Smart Grid (2 units)
  • ELEN 287 Storage Device Systems (2 units)

Renewable Energy (choose any 4 units)

  • ELEN 282 Photovoltaic Devices and Systems (2 units)
  • ELEN 284 Design and Fabrication of Photovoltaic Cells (3 units)
  • ELEN/MECH 286 Introduction to Wind Energy Engineering (2 units)

Sustainability (choose any 4 units)

  • CENG 208 Engineering Economics (2 units)
  • ENGR 272 Energy Public Policy (2 units)
  • ENGR 273 Sustainable Energy and Ethics (2 units)

Certificate in Software Engineering
Advisor: Dr. Rani Mikkilineni

This certificate program places an emphasis on methodologies used in the development of large, complex software. The program is appropriate for anyone who is developing new software, maintaining existing software, or is the technical head of a software development project. In addition to the general requirements, students must have two years of industrial experience in software development and prior coursework in data structures and analysis of algorithms, software engineering, discrete mathematics, and predicate logic.

Required Courses (12 units)

  • COEN 260 Truth, Deduction, and Computation (4 units)
  • COEN 286 Software Quality Assurance and Testing (2 units)
  • COEN 287 Software Development Process Management (2 units)
  • COEN 385 Formal Methods in Software Engineering (2 units)
  • COEN 386 Software Architectures (2 units)
  • COEN 485 Software Engineering Project (2 units)

Elective Courses (Select any 4 units; other courses may be considered if approved in advance)

  • COEN 261 Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs (2 units)
  • COEN 275 Object-Oriented Analysis and Design (4 units)
  • COEN 276 Software Tools Design (4 units)
  • COEN 277 Graphical User Interface Design and Programming (2 units)
  • COEN 388 Principles of Computer-Aided Engineering Design (2 units)
  • EMGT 332 Software Engineering Economics (2 units)
  • EMGT 339 Quality Issues in Managing Software (2 units)
  • EMGT 341 Software Project Metrics (2 units)

Certificate in Information Assurance
Advisor: Dr. JoAnne Holliday

The Advanced Studies in Information Assurance Certificate program provides education in information assurance to working professionals in engineering and engineering management. Applicants are expected to have previous coursework in Operating Systems and Networks. In addition, applicants must complete the course in Group 1, and ten units from Group 2 and additional courses should be chosen from Group 2 or Group 3 for a total of at least 16 units.

Group 1: Required Course

  • COEN 250 Information Security Management (2 units)

Group 2: Select courses from this group (10 units )

  • AMTH 387 Cryptology (4 units)
  • COEN 225 Secure Coding in C and C++ (2 units)
  • COEN 252 & 252L Computer Forensics (5 units
  • COEN 253 Secure Systems Development and Evaluation I (2 units)
  • COEN 350 Network Security (2 units)
  • COEN 351 Internet and E-Commerce Security (2 units)

Group 3: Elective Courses

  • COEN 226 Introduction to System Certification and Accreditation (2 units)
  • COEN 254 Secure Systems Development and Evaluation II (2 units)
  • COEN 286 Software Quality Assurance and Testing (2 units)
  • COEN 288 Software Ethics (2 units)
  • COEN 352 Advanced Topics in Information Assurance (2 units)
  • EMGT 288 Management of Quality Assurance (2 units)
  • EMGT 369 E-Commerce Technology Strategy (2 units)
  • ENGR 310 Engineering Ethics (2 units)
  • ENGR 330 Law, Technology, and Intellectual Property (2 units)

Certificate in Networking
Advisor: Dr. Ahmed Amer

This certificate program is appropriate for working professionals in computer engineering, network engineering, and engineering management, and places an emphasis on the fundamentals and recent developments in computer networking. Students who complete the program may pursue a professional career in computer networking, with the ability to understand, analyze, design, implement, validate, and maintain networked systems.

Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, Mathematics or an equivalent field with a strong academic record, and are expected to have prior coursework in data structures, analysis of algorithms, software engineering and operating systems.

Program Requirements: Students must complete a total of 16 units of prescribed coursework with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course. Certificate requirements substantially equivalent to other coursework completed within the last five years must be replaced by electives approved by the faculty in charge of networking.

Required Courses (8 units)

  • COEN 233 Computer Networks (4 units)
  • COEN 239 Network Design, Analysis (4 units)

Additional Courses (8 units) from:

  • COEN 234, 235, 315, 316, 317, 329, 331, 332, 335, 337, 338, 339, 347, 350, or 351
    or 351

ASIC Design and Test
Advisor: Dr. Samiha Mourad

This certificate program has a dual purpose: (a) to strengthen fundamental knowledge of the design process that helps the designer adapt to future innovations in technology; and (b) to introduce the designer to state-of-the-art tools and techniques. Any change in the requirements must be approved by the academic advisor. The program consists of the eight courses listed below:

Required Courses (16 units)

  • ELEN 387 VLSI Design I (2 units)
  • ELEN 500 Logic Analysis and Synthesis (2 units)
  • ELEN 603 Logic Design Using HDL (2 units)
  • ELEN 605 High-Level Synthesis (2 units)
  • ELEN 608 Design for Testability (2 units)
  • ELEN 624 Signal Integrity in IC and PCB Systems (2 units)
  • Two electives from ELEN 388, 389, 601, 604, 609, 613, 614 or 620 (2 units each)

Analog Circuit Design
Advisor: Dr. Shoba Krishnan

This certificate provides a background in the basic devices and circuits that are fundamental to analog circuit design. The program will also introduce the student to state-of-the-art analog IC design tools. The program consists of the courses listed below totaling 16 units:

Required Courses (14 units)

  • ELEN 252 Analog Integrated Circuits I (2 units)
  • ELEN 253 Analog Integrated Circuits II (2 units)
  • ELEN 254 Advanced Analog Integrated Circuit Design (4 units)
  • ELEN 264 Semiconductor Device Theory I (2 units)
  • ELEN 387 VLSI Design I (2 units)

Elective Courses (2 units)

  • ELEN 251 Transistor Models for IC Design (2 units)
  • ELEN 265 Semiconductor Device Theory II (2 units)
  • ELEN 351 RF Integrated Circuit Design (2 units)
  • ELEN 352 Mixed Signal IC Design for Data Communications (2 units)
  • ELEN 353 Power IC Design (2 units)
  • ELEN 388 VLSI Design II (2 units)

Digital Signal Processing Applications
Advisors: Dr. Tokunbo Ogunfunmi, Dr. Sally Wood

This certificate program provides a basic understanding of digital signal processing theory and modern implementation methods as well as advanced knowledge of at least one specific application area. Digital signal processing has become an important part of many areas of engineering, and this certificate prepares students for traditional or novel applications.

Required Courses (10 to 12 units)

  • AMTH 210 or AMTH 245 (2 units)
  • ELEN 223 Digital Signal Processing System Development (4 units) or
    ELEN 226 DSP Design in FPGA (2 units)
  • ELEN 233E or ELEN 233 and 234 Digital Signal Processing I, II (4 units)
  • ELEN 421 Speech Coding I or ELEN 640 Digital Image Processing I (2 units)

Elective Courses (4 to 6 units to make a total of 16 units) may be selected from the list below. Any courses from the required list above that were not selected to meet the requirements may be included in the elective options.

  • AMTH 308 Theory of Wavelets (2 units) or
    AMTH 358 Fourier Transforms (2 units)
  • ELEN 241 Introduction to Communications (2 units)
  • ELEN 243 Digital Communications Systems (2 units)
  • ELEN 244 Information Theory (2 units)
  • ELEN 247 Communication Systems Modeling Using Simulink I (2 units)
  • ELEN 334 Introduction to Statistical Signal Processing (2 units)
  • ELEN 422 Speech Coding II (2 units)
  • ELEN 431 Adaptive Signal Processing I (2 units)
  • ELEN 643 Digital Image Processing II (2 units)
  • ELEN 644 Computer Vision I (2 units) or ELEN 645 Computer Vision II (2 units)

Digital Signal Processing Theory
Advisors: Dr. Tokunbo Ogunfunmi, Dr. Sally Wood

This certificate program provides a firm grounding in fundamentals of digital signal processing (DSP) technology and its applications. It is appropriate for engineers involved with any application of DSP who want a better working knowledge of DSP theory and its applications. A novel feature of the program is a hands-on DSP hardware/software development laboratory course in which students design and build systems for various applications using contemporary DSP hardware and development software.

Required Courses (8 units)

  • AMTH 308 Theory of Wavelets (2 units) or
    AMTH 358 Fourier Transforms (2 units)
  • ELEN 233E or ELEN 233 and 234 Digital Signal Processing I, II (4 units)
  • ELEN 334 Introduction to Statistical Signal Processing (2 units)

Elective Courses (8 units)

  • ELEN 223 Digital Signal Processing System Development (4 units)
  • ELEN 226 DSP Design in FPGA (2 units)
  • ELEN 235 Estimation I (2 units)
  • ELEN 241 Introduction to Communications (2 units)
  • ELEN 244 Information Theory (2 units)
  • ELEN 336 Detection (2 units)
  • ELEN 431 Adaptive Signal Processing I (2 units)
  • ELEN 640 Digital Image Processing I (2 units)
  • ELEN 641 Image and Video Compression (2 units)
  • ELEN 643 Digital Image Processing II (2 units)

Fundamentals of Electrical Engineering
Advisor: Dr. Shoba Krishnanal

This certificate has been designed for those individuals who have significant work experience in some area of electrical engineering and wish to take graduate-level courses but may lack some prerequisite knowledge because they have not earned the BSEE degree. This one-year program consists of 16 to 28 units, depending on the background of the individual student, and covers electrical engineering core areas. Eight of these units may be credited toward an MSEE degree after successful completion of the certificate.

The required courses are selected with the help of the program advisor according to the student’s background.

  • ELEN 21 Introduction to Logic Design (4 units)
  • ELEN 33 Digital Systems Architecture (5 units)
  • ELEN 50 Electric Circuits I (5 units)
  • ELEN 100 Electric Circuits II (5 units)
  • ELEN 104 Electromagnetics I (5 units)
  • ELEN 110 Linear Systems (5 units) or ELEN 210 (2 units)
  • ELEN 115 Electronic Circuits I (5 units) or ELEN 250 (2 units)

Microwave and Antennas
Advisors: Dr. Timothy Healy, Dr. Ramesh Abhari

The purpose of this certificate is to meet the increasing need for the knowledge in microwave, antenna and RF integrated circuits in present electronic products. This program is offered for students who have a B.S. in Electrical Engineering. The students are expected to have had knowledge of multivariate calculus and preferably partial differential equations.

The curriculum consists of 16 units: Two required courses (4 units) and the 12 units of elective courses listed below:

Required Courses

  • ELEN 201 Electromagnetic Field Theory I (2 units)
  • ELEN 701 Microwave System Architecture (2 units)

Elective Courses

  • Signal Integrity and RF Circuits ELEN 351, 354, 624 (2 units each)
  • RF Circuits: ELEN 351, 354 (2 units each)
  • Laboratory oriented: ELEN 705, 726 (3 units)
  • Passive components: ELEN 706 (4 units)
  • Active components: ELEN 711, 712 (2 units each)
  • Antennas: ELEN 715, 716 (2 units each)
  • Electromagnetics ELEN 203 (2 units)

Substitutions for these courses are only possible with the approval of the certificate advisor and the chair.

Controls
The Controls Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical and closely related fields of engineering. The certificate will provide a foundation in contemporary control theory and methods. The Controls Certificate covers classical and modern control systems and analysis. Specialization in digital control, mechatronics, robotics, or aerospace applications is possible with a suitable choice of electives. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to design and analyze modern control systems

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or closely related field of engineering. They are expected to have prior coursework in undergraduate mathematics. No prior control courses are required.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in course.

Required Courses (8 units)

  • MECH 217 Introduction to Control (2 units)
  • MECH 218 Guidance and Control I (2 units)
  • MECH 323 Modern Control Systems I (2 units)
  • MECH 324 Modern Control Systems II (2 units)

Elective Courses (8 units)

  • AMTH 245 Linear Algebra I (2 units)
  • AMTH 246 Linear Algebra II (2 units)
  • CENG 211 Advanced Strength of Materials (4 units)
  • MECH 207 Advanced Mechatronics I (2 units)
  • MECH 208 Advanced Mechatronics II (2 units)
  • MECH 209 Advanced Mechatronics III (2 units)
  • MECH 219 Guidance and Control II (2 units)
  • MECH 329 Introduction to Intelligent Control (2 units)
  • MECH 355, 356 Adaptive Control I, II (2 units)
  • MECH 429, 430 Optimal Control I, II (2 units)

Dynamics
Objective
The Dynamics Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical and related fields of engineering. The certificate will provide a fundamental and broad background in engineering dynamics. The Dynamics Certificate includes a strong foundational base in dynamics and applications in optimization, robotics, mechatronics, or dynamics of aircraft or spacecraft (depending on the chosen elective courses). Completion of the certificate will allow the student to formulate and solve the complex dynamics problems that arise in such fields as robotics and space flight.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or a closely related field of engineering. They are expected to have prior coursework in undergraduate dynamics and mathematics.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA

Required Courses (16 units)

  • MECH 214, 215 Advanced Dynamics I, II ( 2 units each)
  • MECH 305, 306 Advanced Vibrations I, II ( 2 units each)
  • MECH 431, 432 Spacecraft Dynamics I, II (2 units each)

Elective Courses

  • MECH 205, 206 Aircraft Flight Dynamics I, II (2 units each)
  • MECH 431, 432 Spacecraft Dynamics I, II (2 units each)

Materials Engineering
Objective
The Materials Engineering Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical, materials, or manufacturing engineering. The certificate will provide either an upgrade in materials understanding, or advanced study in a particular aspect of the subject. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to develop a deeper understanding of materials and their applications in design and manufacturing.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or related engineering discipline. They are expected to have prior coursework in basic materials science and strength of materials.

Program Requirements
Students must complete 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (12 units)

  • MECH 281 Fracture Mechanics and Fatigue (2 units)
  • MECH 330 Atomic Arrangements, Defects, and Mechanical Behavior (2 units)
  • MECH 331 Phase Equilibria and Transformations (2 units)
  • MECH 332 Electronic Structure and Properties (2 units)
  • MECH 333 Experiments in Materials Science (2 units)
  • MECH 345 Modern Instrumentation and Control (2 units)

Elective Courses (4 units)

  • AMTH 210 Introduction to Probability I and
    AMTH 211 Continuous Probability (2 units each)
  • AMTH 217 Design of Scientific Experiments and
    AMTH 219 Analysis of Scientific Experiments (2 units each)
  • CENG 211 Advanced Strength of Materials (4 units)
  • ENGR 260 Nanoscale Science and Technology (2 units)
  • ENGR 262 Nanomaterials (2 units)
  • MECH 273 Designing with Plastic Materials (2 units)
  • MECH 274 Processing Plastic Materials (2 units)
  • MECH 277 Injection Mold Tool Design (2 units)
  • MECH 334 Elasticity (2 units)
  • MECH 350 and 351 Composite Materials I and II (2 units each)

Mechanical Design Analysis

Objective
The Mechanical Design Analysis Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical or structural engineering. The certificate will provide a succinct upgrade in knowledge and skills that will allow the student to gain a deeper understanding of CAD and FEA principles and practices. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to pursue more advanced design and analysis tasks.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical, civil, aerospace, or related field. They are expected to have prior coursework in strength of materials, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and mathematics through differential equations.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (12 units)

  • CENG 205 Finite Element Methods I (2 units)
  • CENG 206 Finite Element Methods II (2 units)
  • CENG 207 Finite Element Methods III (2 units)
  • MECH 325 Computational Geometry for Computer-Aided Design and Manufacture (2 units)
  • MECH 334 Elasticity (2 units)
  • MECH 415 Optimization in Mechanical Design (2 units)

Elective Courses (4 units)

  • AMTH 220 Numerical Analysis I (2 units)
  • AMTH 221 Numerical Analysis II (2 units)
  • AMTH 308 Mathematical Modeling I (2 units)
  • AMTH 309 Mathematical Modeling II (2 units)
  • AMTH 370 Optimization Techniques I (2 units)
  • AMTH 371 Optimization Techniques II (2 units)
  • CENG 211 Advanced Strength of Materials (4 units)
  • CENG 214 Theory of Elasticity (4 units)
  • CENG 222 Advanced Structural Analysis (4 units)
  • MECH 268 Computational Fluid Mechanics I (2 units)
  • MECH 269 Computational Fluid Mechanics II (2 units)

Mechatronics Systems Engineering

Objective
The Mechatronics Systems Engineering Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical engineering and related fields. The certificate program introduces students to the primary technologies, analysis techniques, and implementation methodologies relevant to the detailed design of electro-mechanical devices. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to develop systems that involve the sensing, actuation and control of the physical world. Knowledge such as this is vital to engineers in the modern aerospace, robotics and motion control industries.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical, aerospace, electrical, engineering physics, or a related field. They are expected to have prior coursework in mathematics through differential equations, introductory linear control theory, and introductory electronics and programming.

Program Requirements
Students must complete a total of 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (8 units)

  • MECH 207 Advanced Mechatronics I (2 units)
  • MECH 208 Advanced Mechatronics II (2 units)
  • MECH 209 Advanced Mechatronics III (2 units)
  • MECH 217 Introduction to Control (2 units)

Elective Courses (8 units)

  • MECH 218 Guidance and Control I (2 units)
  • MECH 219 Guidance and Control II (2 units)
  • MECH 275A Design for Competitiveness (2 units)
  • MECH 310 Advanced Mechatronics IV (2 units)
  • MECH 311 Modeling and Control of Telerobotic Systems (4 units)
  • MECH 315 Digital Control Systems I (2 units)
  • MECH 316 Digital Control Systems II (2 units)
  • MECH 323 Modern Control Systems I (2 units)
  • MECH 324 Modern Control Systems II (2 units)
  • MECH 329 Intelligent Control (2 units)
  • MECH 337 Robotics I (2 units)
  • MECH 338 Robotics II (2 units)
  • MECH 339 Robotics III (2 units)
  • MECH 345 Modern Instrumentation (2 units)

An independent study or Capstone project would be suitable as one of the electives. In addition, other courses may serve as electives at the discretion of the program advisor.

Thermofluids

Objective
The Thermofluids Certificate is intended for working engineers in mechanical, chemical, or a closely related field of engineering. The certificate will provide fundamental theoretical and analytic background, as well as exposure to modern topics and applications. Specialization in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, or heat transfer is possible with suitable choice of electives. Completion of the certificate will allow the student to design heat transfer and fluid solutions for a range of modern applications.

Admission
Applicants must have completed an accredited bachelor’s degree program in mechanical or a closely related field of engineering. They are expected to have prior undergraduate coursework in fluid mechanics, thermodynamics and heat transfer.

Program Requirements
Students must complete 16 units as described below, with a minimum GPA of 3.0 and a grade of C or better in each course.

Required Courses (12 units) MECH 225 Gas Dynamics I (2 units)

  • MECH 228 Equilibrium Thermodynamics (2 units)
  • MECH 236 Conduction Heat Transfer (2 units)
  • MECH 238 Convective Heat Transfer I (2 units)
  • MECH 240 Radiation Heat Transfer (2 units)
  • MECH 266 Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics (2 units)
  • MECH 270 Viscous Flow I (2 units)

Elective Courses (4 units)

  • MECH 202 Mathematical Methods in Mechanical Engineering (4 units)
  • MECH 225 Gas Dynamics I (2 units)
  • MECH 226 Gas Dynamics II (2 units)
  • MECH 230 Statistical Thermodynamics (2 units)
  • MECH 239 Convective Heat Transfer II (2 units)
  • MECH 241 Radiation Heat Transfer II (2 units)
  • MECH 242 Nanoscale Heat Transfer (2 units)
  • MECH 268 Computational Fluid Mechanics I (2 units)
  • MECH 271 Viscous Flow II (2 units)
  • MECH 288 Energy Conversion I (2 units)
  • MECH 289 Energy Conversion II (2 units)

Lockheed Martin - Santa Clara University Program

The purpose of this chapter is to describe a joint program between Lockheed Martin and Santa Clara University (SCU) for graduate education in space systems engineering. It contains background on the program and its description and structure. The program was formulated in consultation with the faculty and administrators of the School of Engineering at Santa Clara and the University of Denver as well as with management from Lockheed Martin. The program is approved by the SCU Provost Office.

Lockheed Martin has developed an Engineering Leadership Development Program (ELDP) to develop its most promising engineers who have demonstrated leadership potential and are team-oriented, excellent communicators, and problem solvers. The ELDP was first introduced at Lockheed Martin’s site near Denver and the company established an agreement with the University of Denver (DU) by which the University provides graduate degrees for ELDP participants in two aspects of systems engineering: computer systems engineering and mechatronics systems engineering. The degree program in mechatronics systems engineering commenced in January 2005; the program in computer systems engineering 12 months later. The yearly average number chosen for the ELDP program at Denver is about 30.  

Lockheed Martin has now launched the ELDP at its Sunnyvale, California, site, which employs more engineers than its Denver site. The company has established a program at Santa Clara University similar to the one at DU. This program serves two purposes: to provide a graduate degree in some aspect of space systems engineering for the Sunnyvale employees and to enable members of the ELDP group who are transferred from Denver to Sunnyvale and from Sunnyvale to Denver to continue their education in the other city at the other university. This chapter describes the Santa Clara program that meets the needs of Lockheed Martin and cooperates with the University of Denver so that ELDP members who move between Denver and Sunnyvale can take courses at both universities and receive their degree from the university that gives more than 50 percent unit credits.

Although this program was motivated by the interests of Lockheed Martin and establishes specific opportunities for its ELDP student, the Santa Clara University degree tracks and courses offered through this program are available for all qualifying Santa Clara University students.

Curricula
Currently, two degree programs exist at DU tailored to the ELDP, both in “Systems  Engineering”: the M.S. in Computer Systems Engineering and the M.S. in Mechatronics Systems Engineering.

Santa Clara has created two new courses in space systems engineering (called Technical Development Curriculum or TDC courses by Lockheed Martin) and has defined four program tracks (shown below) within the current degree structure, in line with the “Systems Engineering” emphasis as requested by Lockheed Martin. There are other tracks available.

  1. M.S. in Mechanical Engineering (specialization in Mechatronics) (see Plan A for curricular details) 45 units
  2. M.S. in Electrical Engineering (specialization in Mechatronics) (see Plan B for curricular details) 46 units
  3. M.S. in Software Engineering (see Plan C for curricular details) 46 units
  4. M.S. in Computer Engineering (specialization in Software Engineering) (see Plan D for curricular details) 45 units

Common features of these programs:

  1. The programs adhere to the current existing curriculum structures with the incorporation of the TDC courses, in order to maintain program quality and provide the right mixture of theory and practice.
  2. The programs are mainly in close alignment with existing DU-Lockheed Martin programs and their courses, and thus have many one-to-one correspondences on a course-by-course basis. This facilitates students transferring from one site to another.
  3. There are two Technical Development Curriculum (TDC) courses—a total of 8 units, specified under the “elective” portion of the SCU existing structure. The TDC courses are basically “Overview and Design of Space Systems I and II,” currently being developed by SCU with the help of Lockheed Martin.
  4. There is a project management sequence—a total of 4 units, current recommended courses are EMGT 330 and 335.
  5. There is a systems engineering sequence—a total of 4 units, current recommended courses are EMGT 380 and 381.

Admissions
Per SCU regulations, all ELDP students follow normal application procedures through the School of Engineering Graduate Services office. This includes submission of official copies of transcripts from all previous institutions. Admission to SCU is determined by the School of Engineering.  Lockheed will inform SCU of applicants who are participants in ELDP.

The School of Engineering waives the GRE for ELDP applicants who have completed a B.S. degree in engineering, computer science, natural science, or mathematics with a GPA of 3.0 or better (on a scale of 4), except that all M.S. in Software Engineering applicants must have a prior degree in computing or must take the GRE Subject Test in Computer Science, which would then be considered in the admissions decision.

The School of Engineering waives the TOEFL requirement for ELDP students with degrees from foreign institutions who have demonstrated English proficiency in their positions at Lockheed Martin.

Except as noted in the previous two paragraphs, the final determination on admission to each degree program must be completed according to all existing criteria.

AdvisingAn SCU faculty advisor will be assigned to each student. Faculty advisors will need access to transcripts to make a determination about which courses must be taken and which may not be taken as part of a given student’s degree program, and which foundation requirements have been satisfied. (Note: Students with insufficient background might be required to take additional foundation courses beyond the units required for the master’s degree.)

The faculty advisor will work with the student to develop a program of study that includes the TDC, project management, and systems engineering courses and that meets the remaining degree requirements.

Where our current programs have different tracks, ELDP students may complete any track for which they satisfy the requirements.

Transfer CreditsThe School of Engineering will accept up to 22 units of transfer credit toward a 45-unit or 46-unit master’s degree (so that at least half the credits for an SCU degree will have been earned at Santa Clara) provided that no more than nine of the units may be transferred from institutions other than the University of Denver. (The 22-unit limit therefore applies to all students from DU, not just Lockheed students, but not to students from other institutions.) The DU department faculty and Graduate Council approved a similar policy with respect to SCU.

Departments may establish specific lists of DU courses that are pre-approved for transfer into SCU degree programs. Any department may ask its department faculty in charge of each specialization track to determine transfer equivalents from DU courses required by their track. Any request for transfer credit for courses other than those pre-approved as above must be approved by the student’s faculty advisor.

All transfer units must meet the usual criteria:

  • Transferred courses must be of appropriate graduate level and quality compared to courses at SCU.
  • Transferred courses must have a grade of B or better.
  • Transferred courses must not have been applied to another degree.
  • Transferred courses must not repeat prior coursework.

Venue
In general, SCU courses will be taught on the Santa Clara campus. The exception to this are the TDC courses which are often taught at a campus laboratory located in the NASA Research Park in Moffett Field, CA. 

Minimum Enrollment
In any quarter, a TDC course will be offered only if ten or more students are registered (or paid for).

Tuition Payment
There is no change to the current practice for collecting tuition.

Oversight
Santa Clara University will monitor the program for continuous improvement and will conduct a review after three years to make a decision about the future of the program, i.e., continue without modification, continue with modification, or discontinue.

Prerequisite
For students without a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering or equivalent, some foundation courses may be needed.

Overview

    units
TDC courses   8
Systems Engineering and Project Management   8
Mathematics   8
Mechatronics   6
Robotics and Control   8
Thesis or Capstone Project   2
Issues in Professional Practice   2
Technical Electives   3
Total   45

TDC Courses

      units
Space Systems Design and Engineering I ENGR/MECH 371   4
Space Systems Design and Engineering II ENGR/MECH 372   4

Systems Engineering and Project Management

      units
Project Management EMGT 330 and 335   4
Intro to Systems Engineering EMGT 380   2
System Conceptual Design EMGT 381   2

Mathematics

      units
Advanced Engineering Mathematics I & II or the equivalent two-course sequence AMTH/MECH 202
AMTH/MECH 200 and 201
  4
One additional math sequence
approved by advisor
AMTH courses   4

Mechatronics

      units
Advanced Mechatronics I MECH 207   3
Advanced Mechatronics II MECH 208   3

Robotics and Control

      units
Robotics I MECH/ELEN 337   2
Robotics II MECH/ELEN 338   2
Control systems sequence approved by advisor MECH courses   4

Thesis or Capstone Project

      units
Thesis or Capstone Project MECH 290 or 299   2
Issues in Professional Practice course, from the Engineering & Society list of approved graduate core courses ENGR or EMGT course   2

Technical Electives

      unit
Technical Electives     3

 

Prerequisite
For students without a B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering or equivalent, some foundation courses may be needed.

Overview

    units
TDC courses   8
Systems Engineering and Project Management   8

Core: Mathematics and Electrical Engineering

  14
Mechatronics   8
Issues in Professional Practice   2
Technical Electives   6
Total   46

TDC Courses

      units
Space Systems Design and Engineering I ENGR/MECH 371   4
Space Systems Design and Engineering II ENGR/MECH 372   4

Systems Engineering and Project Management

      units

Project Management

EMGT 330 and 335   4
Intro to Systems Engineering EMGT 380   2
System Conceptual Design EMGT 381   2

Core: Mathematics and Electrical Engineering: Select 14 units from:

      units
Design of Scientific Experiments AMTH 217 and 219   4

Linear Algebra II

AMTH 246   2

Applied Graph Theory I

AMTH 256   2
Design and Analysis of Algorithms AMTH 377   4
Advanced Logic Design ELEN 127   2

Electromagnetic Field Theory I

ELEN 201   2

Signals, Circuits, and Systems

ELEN 210

  2
Modern Network Analysis I ELEN 211   2

Mechatronics

      units
Intro to Control Systems ELEN 230   2
Advanced Mechatronics I ELEN 460/MECH 207   2
Advanced Mechatronics II ELEN 461/MECH 208   2
Advanced Mechatronics III ELEN 462/MECH 209   2

Technical Electives: Select 6 units from:

      units
Design of Feedback Control Systems ELEN 231   2
Control Systems I, II ELEN 236, 330   2, 2
Microsensors ELEN 271   2
Robotics I, II, III ELEN/MECH 337, 338, 339   2, 2, 2
Special Topics: Vision Systems for Robotic Applications MECH 296   2
Advanced Mechatronics IV MECH 310   2
Modeling and Control of Telerobotic Systems MECH 311   4

Prerequisite
This is for students who have a bachelor’s degree in computer science, computer engineering, or equivalent.

Overview

      units
TDC courses     8
Systems Engineering and Project Management     8
Core: Software Engineering Core     20
Capstone Project     6
Computer Engineering Graduate Electives     4
  Total   46

TDC Courses

      units
Space Systems Design and Engineering I ENGR/MECH 371   4
Space Systems Design and Engineering II ENGR/MECH 372   4

Systems Engineering and Project Management

      units

Project Management

EMGT 330 and 335   4
Intro to Systems Engineering EMGT 380   2
System Conceptual Design EMGT 381   2

Core: Software Engineering Core

      units
Design and Analysis of Algorithms AMTH 377/COEN 279   4
Truth, Deduction, and Computation COEN 260   4
Software Engineering COEN 285   4
Software Quality Assurance and Testing COEN 286   2
Software Ethics COEN 288   2
Formal Methods in Software Engineering COEN 385   2
Software Architecture

COEN 386

  2

Capstone Project

      unit
Software Engineering Capstone units
(Prerequisites: COEN 286, 386)
COEN 485   6

Computer Engineering Electives

      unit
Computer Engineering Graduate Courses COEN courses   4

Prerequisite
This is for students who have completed (grade B or better) the undergraduate senior/graduate first-year level or equivalent of at least two of the following core courses prior to this M.S. degree: 

Core courses (4 units each)

      Units  
Design and Analysis of Algorithms AMTH 377/COEN 279   4  
Computer Architecture COEN 210   4  
Computer Networks COEN 233   4  
Principles of Programming Languages COEN 256   4  
Operating Systems COEN 283   4  

Overview

    units
TDC courses   8
Systems Engineering and Project Management   8

Computer Engineering Core and Graduate Electives

  13
Software Engineering Specialization Courses   16
Total   45

TDC Courses

      units
Space Systems Design and Engineering I ENGR/MECH 371   4
Space Systems Design and Engineering II ENGR/MECH 372   4

Systems Engineering & Project Management

      units

Project Management

EMGT 330 and 335   4
Intro to Systems Engineering EMGT 380   2
System Conceptual Design EMGT 381   2

(A) Computer Engineering Core: Select 0 to 12 units from:

      units
Design and Analysis of Algorithms AMTH 377/COEN 279   4
Computer Architecture COEN 210   4
Computer Networks COEN 233   4
Principles of Programming Languages COEN 256   4
Operating Systems COEN 283   4

The student must take these core course(s) or equivalent that is/are not completed prior to admission. Equivalent core courses completed prior to admission should not be repeated, but the units may be used for graduate engineering elective courses instead.  

B) Graduate Engineering Electives: Select 0 to 13 units to complete the 45 units degree requirement:

      unit
Graduate Engineering Electives     0-13

Software Engineering Specialization Courses

      units
Truth, Deduction, and Computation COEN 260   4
Software Engineering COEN 285   4
Software Quality Assurance and Testing COEN 286   2
Software Ethics COEN 288   2
Formal Methods in Software Engineering COEN 385   2
Software Architecture COEN 386   2