Skip to main content

2014-2015 Bannan Institute

Shaped by the Spiritual Exercises, the 2014-2015 Bannan Institute explored the theme of Ignatian leadership as a vocational practice or way of proceeding that seeks to affect personal and communal transformation.

In the first principle and foundation of the Spiritual Exercises, St. Ignatius of Loyola urges: “I ought to desire and elect only the thing which is more conducive to the end for which I am created.” 

 

Leadership and Justice

Focusing on the practice of justice within Ignatian leadership, exploring how commitments to solidarity and social justice ground the work of Ignatian leaders and shape the work of Jesuit higher education as a proyecto social.

 

Leadership and Faith

Examining the role of faith within the practice of Ignatian leadership, engaging the foundational witness of Jesus, the import of interreligious dialogue and encounter in transforming and healing our world, and the examples of women and men with Ignatian vocations, including Pope Francis.

 

Leadership and the Intellectual Life

Considering the role of the intellectual life within Ignatian leadership, examining the means by which Jesuit, Catholic universities seek to form whole persons, engaged citizens, and accountable leaders.

  • I am climate change, I am the cause, I am the solution

    Carolyn Woo

    In Laudato Si, citing both Science and Theology, Pope Francis establishes the climate crisis as real, urgent, moral, and spiritual. He links the cry of the earth to the cry of the poor and casts it as expressions of the same underlying dynamics. The pope calls for a conversion of heart so that we can cherish the earth as God’s creation and gift to us and to lift up the dignity of people above profits, technology and globalization.

  • Is There a Common Good? Exploring the Politics of Inequality

    Matthew Carnes, S.J.

    Recent decades have seen an unprecedented decline in global poverty. Yet this progress has been accompanied by an increase in economic and social inequality, both internationally and domestically. What are the implications of this trend? What does it mean to pursue the common good today? This lecture will draw on recent social science scholarship and Catholic social teaching to chart the promises and pitfalls facing global and local communities today.

  • Is There a Common Good? Exploring the Politics of Inequality

    Matthew Carnes, S.J.

    Recent decades have seen an unprecedented decline in global poverty. Yet this progress has been accompanied by an increase in economic and social inequality, both internationally and domestically. What are the implications of this trend? What does it mean to pursue the common good today? This lecture will draw on recent social science scholarship and Catholic social teaching to chart the promises and pitfalls facing global and local communities today.

  • Looking at Vatican II with Pope Francis' Eyes - Leadership and Spirituality

    John W. O’Malley, S.J.

    From the moment Pope Francis appeared on the balcony of St. Peter's after his election, he caught the attention of the world and soon became acknowledged as one of the great leaders of our times. However, unlike his immediate predecessors he rarely speaks about Vatican II. Why? How, if at all, do his sometimes dramatic gestures relate to the council? The lecture will address such questions.

  • Interreligious Dialogue and Leadership - Building Relationships as Persons

    Rabbi Abraham Skorka

    The 20th century saw the displacement of the traditional religions in occident by new anthropocentric pagan doctrines, Fascism, Nazism, Stalinism, being among the most conspicuous examples of them. Since the seventies of the last century, and after the fall of those regimes, a return to the traditional religions occurred. But it was not a return to the tradition through a renew of the religiosity of its spirit, but a return, in many cases, to their fanatic expressions. The challenge of this lecture is to enhance a deep interreligious dialogue in order to build up a different reality in which the dramatic failures of the last century will not repeat in this century and forever.

  • A View from the Bus - Reflecting on the Axles of Faith and Justice

    Simone Campbell, S.S.S

    Sr. Simone Campbell, public advocate for peace-building, immigration reform, healthcare and economic justice will reflect on the integral relationship between faith and justice within her own vocation and share her journey as a “Nun on the Bus” to ignite social change.

  • Citizens and Leaders - The Public Role of the Humanities

    Martha Nussbaum

    People sometimes dismiss liberal arts education as useless. But any country needs citizens who can think critically, discuss world issues knowledgeably, and understand the point of view of someone whose background and interests differ from their own. These abilities are nourished by the humanities and the arts, so they play a vital role in education at all levels.

  • Encountering Jesus: Who Do You Say that I Am?

    James Martin, S.J.

    What does it mean to meet the Christ of faith and the Jesus of history? Can we come to know Jesus through the Gospels? Father Jim Martin, S.J., author of the New York Times bestseller Jesus: A Pilgrimage helps us to understand what the Son of God has to do with the carpenter from Nazareth.

  • Encountering Jesus: Who Do You Say that I Am?

    James Martin, S.J.

    What does it mean to meet the Christ of faith and the Jesus of history? Can we come to know Jesus through the Gospels? Father Jim Martin, S.J., author of the New York Times bestseller Jesus: A Pilgrimage helps us to understand what the Son of God has to do with the carpenter from Nazareth.

  • Encounter, Engage, Create - Moral Imagination and Ignatian Leadership

    Maureen O’Connell

    Catholic Social Teaching was developed by Roman Catholic church leaders seeking to respond to the demands of justice in the 20th century. The three-step methodology of Catholic Social Teaching: “see->judge->act” offers an effective tool for responding to what popes and bishops call “the signs of the times” and have helped Catholics face everything from the industrial revolution and the Cuban Missile Crisis to economic development and presidential elections. But what if our 21st century context — with growing social inequality, debilitating racism and sexism, people on the move across borders, economies fueled by violence, polarized political debate and paralyzed political processes — necessitates a different praxis? What if we need a praxis that moves all people of good will, and not simply