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Elsa Chen receives $441,093 from The New Venture Fund

Elsa Chen with the Political Science Department has received a $441,093 grant from New Venture Fund. These funds will support her project " The Impact of Automated Record Clearance on Individuals, Families, and Communities: A Qualitative Inquiry". As Clean Slate legislation is adopted and implemented in some states, empirical evidence of its positive effects can encourage adoption in additional jurisdictions. Furthermore, a clear understanding of shortcomings or barriers that limit the effectiveness of automated record clearance can guide improvements to policies and processes to better improve quality of life for individuals whose records have been cleared, and better enhance public safety and economic vitality in their communities. To determine the individual effects of record clearance via clean slate reforms, the research team will interview 200 people with expugnable or expunged criminal records from four states (50 interviews per state). Follow-up interviews will be conducted with 100 respondents to determine if additional benefits are actualized over time. To examine the impact of clean slate reforms on communities and society, the research team will interview 40 representatives from community and local/state government agencies (ten per state) in California, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Utah. The primary investigative strategy will be semi-structured interviews. We expect to produce three categories of deliverables: (1) Policy briefs summarizing best practices in the design and implementation of record clearance legislation, (2) Educational materials such as handouts and infographics to share with community organizations and partners for their websites and social media, and (3) Traditional academic outputs, including peer-reviewed articles and conference presentations.
Elsa Chen with the Political Science Department has received a $441,093 grant from New Venture Fund. These funds will support her project " The Impact of Automated Record Clearance on Individuals, Families, and Communities: A Qualitative Inquiry".

As Clean Slate legislation is adopted and implemented in some states, empirical evidence of its positive effects can encourage adoption in additional jurisdictions. Furthermore, a clear understanding of shortcomings or barriers that limit the effectiveness of automated record clearance can guide improvements to policies and processes to better improve quality of life for individuals whose records have been cleared, and better enhance public safety and economic vitality in their communities. To determine the individual effects of record clearance via clean slate reforms, the research team will interview 200 people with expugnable or expunged criminal records from four states (50 interviews per state). Follow-up interviews will be conducted with 100 respondents to determine if additional benefits are actualized over time. To examine the impact of clean slate reforms on communities and society, the research team will interview 40 representatives from community and local/state government agencies (ten per state) in California, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Utah. The primary investigative strategy will be semi-structured interviews. We expect to produce three categories of deliverables: (1) Policy briefs summarizing best practices in the design and implementation of record clearance legislation, (2) Educational materials such as handouts and infographics to share with community organizations and partners for their websites and social media, and (3) Traditional academic outputs, including peer-reviewed articles and conference presentations.