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Faculty Learning Communities

The Collaborative for Teaching Innovation is pleased to  announce two Faculty Learning Communities (FLCs) in Winter quarter and two FLCs in Spring quarter.

What is a Faculty Learning Community (FLC)?

FLCs are groups of approximately 10 faculty members from different disciplines who come together around a common interest or problem to deepen their knowledge and expertise. In FLCs, members may do some readings in common, discuss relevant aspects of  teaching and learning, and explore and experiment with new pedagogies or approaches. At SCU, typically FLCs meet five times per quarter and provide light snacks for the meetings. Meetings are scheduled by the facilitator based on availability of the members. The FLC may last just one quarter or run throughout the course of a year, depending on the interests of the members. Sometimes inquiries undertaken by FLCs will lead to a publication in a teaching-related journal.

If you’re interested in participating in one or more of these FLCs listed below, please sign up below and the facilitator will be in touch with more information or to answer your questions. Upon completion of the FLC, faculty participants will receive a certificate of completion recognizing their participation and learning.

 

Faculty Learning Communities - Winter Quarter

Tim Urdan (Psychology & Liberal Studies), Facilitator 

Meets for one hour every other Monday starting January 11, 2016 between 12:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. based on a mutually agreeable time for the most participants

As college instructors, we have the important responsibility of assessing our students' knowledge, skills, and effort. Yet few of us receive any training in how to design an assessment plan that is valid, fair, or closely aligned with what we would like students to get from being in our class. In this Faculty Learning Community (FLC), we will meet every other week during Winter quarter 2016 to discuss principles of effective assessment, share strategies that work well, and develop or refine assessments that are closely aligned with your learning goals. Plus, there will be snacks!  Let Tim know if you’re interested in participating and whether you can make the proposed date/time.

Tonya Nilsson (Civil Engineering), Facilitator 
Meets every other Tuesday starting January 12, 2016, 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m.
 
What are effective activities in the classroom to engage students in the learning?  How do you start?  How do you manage the activity? Join the Winter 2016 Faculty Learning Community (FLC) focused on developing in-class learning activities. We will meet every other week to review proven class activities, develop ways to integrate these strategies in your own classroom and to create new activities aligned with your teaching goals. The FLC will provide a friendly and supportive place to get feedback and advice on activities ideas and suggestions for classroom management.

Faculty Learning Communities - Spring Quarter

Tracy Ruscetti (Biology & Public Health), Facilitator, Christelle Sabatier (Biology) Co-facilitator, Jeremy Kemp (Academic Technologies), Technical Facilitator.

Delivering some (or most) of your course content online can free your class time so that you can help students tackle the more complex aspects of the material.  In this FLC, we will meet to discuss common issues, strategize and implement solutions, and provide constructive feedback on individual projects.  Faculty who are thinking about developing online content as well as faculty who are currently using online resources are encouraged to participate.  

 

Pedro Hernández-Ramos (Education), Facilitator

Meets every other Thursday, 12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

How can faculty design learning experiences that have a better chance of meeting the learning needs of all their students? Are there useful theoretical frameworks that can help faculty think through pedagogical challenges and problems? In this FLC we will read selected chapters from Diana Laurillard’s book, Teaching as a Design Science–Building Pedagogical Patterns for Learning and Technology (Routledge, 2013) and work with a free web-based tool, “Learning Designer” (learningdesigner.org) to plan learning experiences that can range from a single class session to an entire quarter-long unit.