Campus

In Celebration of Family

In Celebration of Family
Charles Barry
by Deborah Lohse |

New to campus this February is a bronze sculpture of the Holy Family of Mary, Joseph, and Jesus by artist A. Wasil. In Celebration of Family was the last work by Wasil, whose larger-than-life bronzes also grace the Vatican and Mission San Luis Rey in Southern California; he died in 2008. The sculpture is located near the entrance of the Harrington Learning Commons, Sobrato Technology Center, and Orradre Library. It was donated by physician Rudolf L. Brutoco '74 and Diana Brutoco '74, and the Brutocao Family Foundation, with special support from Malcolm Cisneros Law Corp.

Longtime supporters of SCU, the Brutocaos and their extended family’s contributions to SCU include the establishment of the Louis and Dorina Brutocao Award for Teaching Excellence and the Brutocao Family Foundation Award for Curriculum Innovation; Rudolf Brutoco is also a member of the University Board of Regents.

    

Winter 2014

Table of contents

Features

Rise up, my love

There are the sanctuaries built for worship—and that carry beauty and grace for all to see. Then there are the improvised places of faith, perhaps more subtle in how they speak to the wonder worked there.

The chaplain is in the House

With the way things have gone recently in Congress, looking to the heavens for some help and guidance might seem like a very good idea. In fact, that’s what Pat Conroy, S.J., M.Div. ’83 is there to do.

Welcome to Citizenville

Who published the one book on government in 2013 that conservative firebrand Newt Gingrich told all true believers that they should read? Well, the author is now lieutenant governor of California. Before that, he was mayor of San Francisco. That’s right: It’s Gavin Newsom ’89.

Mission Matters

Goooaal!

Women’s soccer wins the West Coast Conference championship.

Patent trolls, beware

The White House has brought on SCU’s Colleen Chien, a leading expert in patent law, as senior advisor.

A sight of innocence

George Souliotes went to prison for three life sentences after he was convicted of arson and murder. Twenty years later, he’s out—after the Northern California Innocence Project proved he didn’t do it.