Mission Matters

COMMENCEMENT

A greater sense of purpose

mm-commencement
Commencement 2011. Photo by Charles Barry.


At the 160th undergraduate commencement at Santa Clara it was a blue-skied day for 1,350 newly degreed grads and families to celebrate with laughter, tears, and cheers.

Khaled Hosseini '88
Humane doctor—and writer: Khaled
Hosseini ’88 presented his honorary
degree by Professor Bill Eisinger, left,
and President Michael Engh, S.J.
World-renowned author of The Kite Runner and physician Khaled Hosseini ’88 was awarded an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters before delivering the day’s commencement address. It was a proud moment for his mentor in biology at Santa Clara: Professor William Eisinger, who read the proclamation awarding the degree. Several years ago, while back visiting the Mission Campus, Hosseini revealed that Eisinger, through a selfless act of generosity, worked on Hosseini’s behalf to obtain special funding to ensure that he would be able to travel to needed medical school interviews.

In his commencement address, Hosseini in turn challenged the new graduates to live up to the ideals that define Santa Clara and to be men and women for others. “Making a difference in the world, no matter how large or small that difference is, will change your life in extraordinary ways and connect you to a greater sense of purpose,” he said. (Read his talk in Afterwords.) 

Also honored was Charles Currie, S.J., retiring president of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities, for his impact on Jesuit higher education across the country.

Graduating senior Jessica Cassella, a political science major, was recognized as valedictorian. The St. Clare and Nobili medals, honoring outstanding academic performance, personal character, school activities, and constructive contribution to the University, were awarded respectively to Stephanie Wilson (see the Spring 2010 SCM for a profile) and Quentin Orem. The Peter-Hans Kolvenbach, S.J. Award, recognizing graduating seniors who exemplify the ideals of Jesuit education, especially being a “whole person of solidarity in the real world,” was presented to Christopher Freeburg. Connie Coutain and Steven Boyd Saum mag-bug


 GRADUATE AND LAW COMMENCEMENT

A grateful, prayerful heart

Sharon Kugler
Three firsts at Yale: Sharon Kugler ’81
Keeping a grateful, prayerful heart will fortify you for life’s inevitable surprises, conflicts, and tragedies, Sharon Kugler ’81 told the 1,000 or so graduates at commencement on June 10 for Santa Clara University’s four advanced-degree programs: engineering, business, counseling psychology, and pastoral ministries. 

Yale University’s first female, first Roman Catholic, and first lay chaplain, Kugler advised: “As members of one human family, whether we like it or not, we live our sorrows together, but the power and mystery of human resilience is a constant in our lives.”

Access for those in need

Use your law degree to make legal and civic rights accessible to those without resources, former California Supreme Court Justice Carlos Moreno told the 300 graduating law students from Santa Clara University School of Law on May 21, during the law school’s centennial year. 

Unless individual rights to due process, equal protection, and civil rights “are enforced and exercised and given meaning in actual practice,” he said, then “for all intents and purposes they may as well cease to exist for many people in our society.” 

But armed with a degree from Santa Clara, he encouraged, “You will be truly amazed at the impact you are going to be able to have with it as you enter the practice of law and join the pantheon of truly great lawyers who have come from this law school.”  Deborah Lohse mag-bug

Commencement

Look sharp: Muhab Benten M.S. ’11 clasps the shoulder of son Mohammed—and his degree in engineering management and leadership. Maxine Goynes ’11 (left) and Lauren Anselmo ’11. Photos by Charles Barry.

 

Morgan Hunter '11

Youngest grad


Morgan Hunter ’11 distinguished herself at Santa Clara in a few remarkable ways. She enrolled already commanding a knowledge of Ancient Greek. And she graduated at age 18. After scoring a perfect 800 on the verbal section of the SAT in the 7th grade, the classics major from Palo Alto began her freshman year at SCU in lieu of high school. She studied French, German, Japanese, Arabic, and Sanskrit—and this year taught Latin at her middle school. This fall she began graduate studies in classics at U.C. Berkeley. Connie Coutain mag-bug

 

Mission

Commencement by the numbers


18 age of youngest SCU graduate

40 countries represented 

3,000 pounds of ice for alumni picnic 

82,300 square feet (almost 2 acres) of tents

 
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