Mission Matters

Snapshot

Santa Clara Snapshot: 1942

Santa Clara Snapshot: 1942
Welcome to the Mission Campus: Freshmen entering in 1942. Photo from SCU Archives.
by Jon Teel '12 |
    Photo from The Redwood.
  • 1 Japanese “Zero” fighter shot down by 1st Lt. Robert L. McDonald ’42 on Oct. 3, 1942
  • 3 chaplains from University aid war effort: Raymond Copeland, S.J., W. H. Crowley, S.J., Cyril Kavanagh, S.J.
  • 5 cents per issue of The Santa Clara newspaper
  • 10 seniors join the military during their final collegiate year, preventing them from receiving their degrees that spring
  • 18 years of age replaces the previous age for service of 21, per the War Department’s announcement
  • 90 percent-plus of Santa Clara students are engaged in the pursuit of a military course of one nature or another
  • 497 students register for the second semester of the 1941–42 year
  • 5,000-word, typewritten thesis required for all degrees
  • $200,000 University debt for building Nobili Hall (erected in 1930), providing urgently needed modern kitchen and dining halls, and additional living quarters for lay faculty and students

 

 

 

Winter 2012

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Features

My fight, my faith

As secretary of defense in an age of budget austerity, Leon Panetta '60, J.D. '63 has to make sure the Pentagon doesn't break the bank and that the nation doesn't break faith with the men and women who serve.

Bronco Battalion

What does it mean for a Jesuit university to be home to the Reserve Officers' Training Corps? Seventy-five years after ROTC came to Santa Clara—and 150 years after officers were first trained on campus—a few answers are clear.

Mission Matters

Going global

A $2 million grant creates a year-long fellowship program—with students taking part in a global network of socially conscious businesses.

Bribes, bombs, and outright lies

Legendary lawyer Clarence Darrow comes to campus—and shows that ethical issues raised in the Trial of the Century remain as vexing today as they did when spittoons lined the courthouse floor.

Alumni Arts

Let me lay it on you

Hot Tuna is back with their first studio recording in 20 years.