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Summer 2017 Courses

 

“The Young Scholars Program helped me quite a bit. The class provided me the college student experience and hands on experience with engineering . . . I had a fun time building the robots with my classmates.”  
- 2016 Young Scholar

Courses Offered In:

Anthropology ▪ Art ▪ Classics ▪ Computer Engineering ▪ Computer Science ▪ Economics ▪ Electrical Engineering ▪ Environmental Studies and Sciences ▪ General Engineering ▪ History ▪ Mathematics ▪ Music ▪ Philosophy ▪ Physics ▪ Religious Studies ▪ Sociology ▪ Spanish

 

NOTE: Unless otherwise stated, high school courses do not fulfill a prerequisite. All information is subject to change without notice or obligation.
 
M=Monday, T=Tuesday, W=Wednesday, R=Thursday
 
 
Anthropology
ANTH 1 Introduction to Biological Anthropology (4 units)
Lecture: MWR   1:00-3:10 PM
Lab: T   1:00-3:10 PM
     Using an evolutionary framework, we examine how past and current human variation is measured, our place in nature, human genetics, human and nonhuman primate biology and behavior, the primate and hominin fossil record, and the origin and meaning of human biological and behavioral variation. Students gain experience in biological anthropology methods, data analysis and interpretation, and the theoretical frameworks that guide our understanding of what it means to be human. Must be registered for the Biological Anthropology Lab. (Lab 15 hours).
 
ANTH 5 Biological Anthropology and Popular Culture (4 units)
MTR   1:00-3:10 PM
     From King Kong to Clan of the Cave Bear, students examine popular culture interpretations of biological anthropology. After reviewing the history of biological anthropology, we analyze popular avenues (film, cartoons, newspapers, fiction) through which the public has been informed about human variation, the human fossil record, primate behavior, and human genetics.
 
 
Art
ARTS 43 Basic Painting (4 units)
MW     6:00 – 9:00 p.m.
     Introduction to painting, primarily with water‐based acrylic paints. Through guided projects, students will develop a language of lines, shapes, colors, and composition to express their ideas visually.
 
ARTS 46 Basic Watercolor (4 units)
MWR  1:00 – 3:10 p.m.
     Introduction to visual expression in the classic medium of transparent watercolor. Assignments will emphasize basic elements of shape, color, light, shadow, and composition. Previous experience in drawing recommended.
 
ARTS 74 Basic Computer Imaging (4 units)
MWR  3:20 – 5:30 p.m.
     Hands-on introduction to computer imaging for the lower-division student. Fundamental instruction in raster- and vector-based imaging software to manipulate photographs and create original imagery. Exploration of both fine art and commercial uses of digital media. Recommended as a foundation course to be taken prior to other computer art courses.
 
 
Classics
CLAS 65 Classical Mythology (4 units)
MTR    10:20 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
     Principal gods and heroes of Greek and Roman antiquity: their stories, significance, and pictorial representations. Implications of myth in society and possible origins of myth. Important background for European and English literature.
 
 
Computer Science
CSCI 10 Introduction to Computer Science (5 units - updated 4.27.17)
MWR   10:20 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
     Introduction to computer programming and computer science. Basic programming structures, conditionals, loops, functions, arrays. Topics relating to the applications of and social impact of computing, including privacy, artificial intelligence, computation in physics, psychology, and biology. Discussion of cryptography, computation through history, networks, hardware. Includes weekly lab. CSCI 10 may not be taken for credit if the student has received credit for COEN 10 or a similar introductory programming course. 
 
 
Environmental Studies and Sciences
ENVS 22 Introduction to Environmental Studies (4 units)
MWR   1:00 p.m. - 3:10 p.m.
     This course presents environmental studies as an interdisciplinary academic field focused on society-nature relations. In part one, we examine population, markets, institutions, ethics, hazards, political economy, and social construction as core social science perspectives. Part two uses these approaches to explain nature-society puzzles related to agriculture, food, energy, climate change, biodiversity, forests, oceans, and land use change. In each of these cases, we focus on specific objects and their context (e.g., tuna in the Pacific Ocean, or redwood trees in northern California), as we analyze human-environment interdependence, and assess the complex causes, consequences, and potential responses to change processes occurring at the local, national, and global scales. We will also consider the personal and collective dimensions of social change through environmental civic engagement.
 
 
History
HIST 96A Colonization, Revolution, and Civil War: The United States, Origins to 1877 (4 units)
MTR    1:00 – 3:10 p.m.
     A survey of the history of the United States from European colonization to Reconstruction. Political, economic, social, and intellectual aspects of America’s first 250 years.
 
 
Mathematics
MATH 8 Introduction to Statistics (4 units)
MTR    1:00 – 3:10 p.m.
     Elementary topics in statistics chosen from descriptive statistics, probability, random variables and distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, regression, and correlation.
 
MATH 11 Calculus and Analytic Geometry I (4 units)
MTR    10:20 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
     Differentiation and applications, introduction to integration. Ordinarily, only one of MATH 11, or 30 may be taken for credit. (Note: MATH 11 is not a suitable prerequisite for MATH 31.) Prerequisite: High school trigonometry and either Calculus Readiness Exam or satisfactory grade in MATH 9. If MATH 9 is taken, a grade of C‐ or higher is strongly recommended before taking MATH 11.
 
MATH 13 Calculus and Analytic Geometry III (4 units)
MTR    1:20 – 3:30 p.m. (Time changed on 2/8/17.)
     Infinite series, vectors, vector functions, quadric surfaces. Prerequisite: MATH 12 or equivalent. A grade of C– or higher in MATH 12 is strongly recommended before taking MATH 13.
 
 
Modern Languages and Literatures
SPAN 2 Elementary Spanish II (4 units)
MTR    1:00 – 3:10 p.m.
     The second in a series of three courses, SPAN 2 emphasizes the development of communicative language skills (understanding, speaking, reading, and writing). Development of an understanding of Hispanic culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 1, or two years of high school Spanish, or equivalent.
 
 
Music
MUSC 1 Music Theory I (4 units)
MTR    1:00 – 3:10 p.m.
     Beginning course in a comprehensive theory sequence; covers notation, scales, intervals, chords, rhythm, and meter. Required for musical theatre minor. Prerequisite: None. Majors and minors with extensive theory background are recommended to take the Theory Placement Exam.
 
 
Philosophy
PHIL 4B Ethics and Gender in Film (4 units)
MTR    1:00 – 3:10 p.m.
     Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Em- phasis on ethical principles and theories as they relate to concepts of gender and sex ap- plicable to both males and females. In addition to written texts about ethics and gender, both dramatic and documentary films will be studied to illustrate how gender is both experienced by men and women and portrayed in the lived world. Topics studied may include sexuality and sexual orientation, male and female gender roles, heterosexual/ homosexual marriage and family life, sexual violence, transsexuality, abortion and reproduction, and gender discrimination. Films studied may include Southern Comfort, Boys Don’t Cry, Daddy and Papa, Sliding Doors, The Brandon Teena Story, If These Walls Could Talk, The Laramie Project, and Juno.
 
PHIL 5 Ethical Issues in Society (4 units)
MTR  8:00 – 10:10 a.m.
     Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Special attention to general ethical principles and to the practical application of these principles to current ethical issues in society. Topics may include the concepts of freedom, obligation, value, rights, justice, virtue, and moral responsibility, as applied to issues like abortion, punishment, economic distribution, racial and sexual discrimination, sexuality, political obligation, nuclear war, and pornography.
 
PHIL 10 Ethics and the Law (4 units)
MWR  3:20 – 5:30 p.m.
     Formal inquiry into normative ethics. Emphasis on moral issues and concepts in contemporary legal debates such as the rule of law, the duty to aid, the relationship between law and ethics, freedom of speech, the right to die, criminally charging minors as adults, the legalization of drugs, obscenity and indecency, the moral justification for punishment, including capital punishment, and state regulation of marriage.
 
  
Physics
PHYS 31 Physics for Scientists and Engineers I (5 units)
Lecture:  MTWR   10:20 -12:00 p.m.
Lab: MT   1:00 – 4:00 p.m.
     Measurement. Vectors. Straight‐line kinematics. Kinematics in two dimensions. Laws of inertia, mass conservation, and momentum conservation. Center‐of‐mass and reference frames. Force. Newtonian mechanics and its applications. Work and kinetic energy. Potential energy and energy conservation. Rotational dynamics. Statics. Prerequisite: MATH 11. The PHYS 31/32/33 sequence and the PHYS 11/12/13 sequence cannot both be taken for credit.
 
 
Religious Studies
RSOC 9 Ways of Understanding Religion (4 units)
MW     3:20-6:20 p.m.
     Introduces the categories by which religion is formally studied. Explores distinct perspectives or ways of thinking about religion (e.g., psychological, phenomenological, anthropological, theological, and sociological); also considers a variety of religious data (e.g., symbols, myths, rituals, theologies, and modern communities).
 
Sociology
SOCI 33 Social Problems in the U.S. (4 units)
MTR   10:20-12:30 PM
     Overview of contemporary social problems in the United States from a sociological perspective, with a major emphasis on the ways race, class, and gender shape the development of specific social problems and the public policies offered to address them. Topics may include the economy, poverty, homelessness, and social inequality.
NOTE: Unless otherwise stated, high school courses do not fulfill a prerequisite. All information is subject to change without notice or obligation.
 
M=Monday, T=Tuesday, R=Thursday
 
 
Economics
ECON 1 Principles of Microeconomics (4 units)
MTR    10:20 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.
     Introduction to microeconomics and its applications to business decisions and public policy. Topics include supply, demand, and the coordinating role of prices in a market economy; the behavior of business firms, including output and pricing decisions; competition and monopoly; government policies and regulations affecting markets.
 
ECON 2 Principles of Macroeconomics (4 units)
MTR    1:00 – 3:10 p.m.
     Determinants of national income and product in the long run and short run; inflation, unemployment, and business cycles; monetary and fiscal policies; and economic growth. Prerequisite: ECON 1.
 
ECON 3 International Economics, Development and Growth (4 units)
MTR    3:20 – 5:30 p.m.
     Analysis of international trade theory and policy, balance‐of‐payments adjustments and exchange‐rate regimes, and economic development. Prerequisite: ECON 2.
Note: Unless otherwise stated, high school courses do not fulfill a prerequisite. All information is subject to change without notice or obligation.
 
M=Monday, T=Tuesday, W=Wednesday, R=Thursday
 
 
Computer Engineering
COEN 21 Introduction to Logic Design (4 units)
TR   5:00-8:00 PM
     Boolean functions and their minimization. Designing combinational circuits, adders, multipliers, multiplexers, decoders. Noise margin, propagation delay. Bussing. Memory elements: latches and flip-flops; timing; registers; counters. Programmable logic, PLD, and FPGA. Use of industry quality CAD tools for schematic capture and HDL in conjunction with FPGAs. Also listed as ELEN 21. Co-requisite: COEN 21L.
 
COEN 21L Logic Design Laboratory (1 unit)
W   5:00-8:00 PM
     Laboratory for COEN 21. Also listed as ELEN 21L. Co-requisite: COEN 21.
 
 
Electrical Engineering
ELEN 21 Introduction to Logic Design (4 units)
TR   5:00-8:00 PM
     Boolean functions and their minimization. Designing combinational circuits, adders, multipliers, multiplexers, decoders. Noise margin, propagation delay. Bussing. Memory elements: latches and flip-flops; timing; registers; counters. Programmable logic, PLD, and FPGA. Use of industry quality CAD tools for schematic capture and HDL in conjunction with FPGAs. Also listed as COEN 21. Co-requisite: ELEN 21L.
 
ELEN 21L Logic Design Laboratory (1 unit)
W   5:00-8:00 PM
     Laboratory for ELEN 21. Also listed as COEN 21L. Co-requisite: ELEN 21.
 
 
General Engineering
ENGR 1 Introduction to Engineering (1 unit)
MR      1:00 – 2:00 p.m.
     Introduction to the different engineering disciplines. Interdisciplinary aspects of engineering. Engineering professionalism, ethics, and civic engagement. Co-requisite: ENGR 1L.
 
ENGR 1L Introduction to Engineering Laboratory (1 unit)
MR      2:00 – 5:00 p.m.
     Laboratory for ENGR 1. Co-requisite: ENGR 1.