Skip to main content

Mumbai, India

Saturday, July 1 - Saturday, July 15, 2017

Cost: $2500

 

The Mumbai, India Immersion engages the reality of urban and rural poverty in the world’s second largest country (by population). In 2010 it was estimated that 30% of India’s population, some 406 million people, lived below the poverty line. As a point of comparison the total population of the United States is roughly 317 million.
The immersion group will spend a week in Mumbai learning from and accompanying communities with little access to wealth, power and privilege. Some activities will include volunteering at a residential hospital run by the Sisters of Charity, doing home-stays with students from the Jesuit Engineering College, engaging with adolescents at a Jesuit residential program for street kids, visiting a women’s college to learn about the reality of gender violence and inequality, visiting a hindu temple and a mosque. During the first week Professor Shoba Krishnan will lead the group along with students from Xavier Institute of Engineering in a community needs assessment in Dahravi, Asia's largest Slum. For this portion of the trip, the group will stay at Vinyalaya, a Jesuit retreat house in the city.
The second week will be spent in and around Talasari where students will immerse themselves in rural life and learn about/engage the reality of India’s tribal communities. Students will stay with communities of Jesuits and women religious who run various schools and boarding houses for tribal children. Activities will include tutoring english, visiting schools, visiting some tribal villages, learning about the social and educational works being done in these communities.


Students who desire to travel to Delhi, Taj Mahal, etc. or any other sites within India at the end of the trip will have the option of routing a separate return flight home, though this will not be part of the formal immersion program.

Image link to full article

Drenched in Rain and Culture

SCU students experience full immersion into Indian realities.

More »