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vocation discernment

Discernment

Ignatian Spirituality invites us to cultivate alignment between heart and mind, to continually discern between our own needs and the needs of the world. 

If you are seeking a community to connect with to learn practices that will support your day-to-day discernment in the charism of Ignatian Spirituality, check out CLC.

Each quarter we will be holding events to support you in your vocation discernment. On this site you can find information about many opportunities for formation as you seek to answer where God is calling you in life. Please check out the various pathways below!

 “Vocation is the place where our deep gladness meets the world's deep need.”

Frederick Buechner

Discerning a call

Discerning Opportunities

Discerning Careers

Be patient toward all that is unsolved in your heart and try to love the questions themselves… Do not now seek the answers, which cannot be given you because you would not be able to live them. And the point is, to live everything. Live the questions now. Perhaps you will then gradually, without noticing it, live along some distant day into the answer.

Rainer Maria Rilke, Letters to a Young Poet

"Vocations aren't the result of planning, but an encounter with God that changes your life."

Pope Francis

“The country is in deep trouble. We've forgotten that a rich life consists fundamentally of serving others, trying to leave the world a little better than you found it. We need the courage to question the powers that be, the courage to be impatient with evil and patient with people, the courage to fight for social justice. In many instances we will be stepping out on nothing, and just hoping to land on something. But that's the struggle. To live is to wrestle with despair, yet never allow despair to have the last word.”

Cornel West

Let the beauty of what you love be what you do. 

Jalāl ad-Dīn Muḥammad Rūmī

"The future is not some place we are going to but one we are creating. The paths to it are not found but made, and the making of those pathways changes both the maker and the destination."

Margaret Silf, Wayfaring: A Gospel Journey in Everyday Life

“We arrive in this world with birthright gifts—then we spend the first half of our lives abandoning them or letting others disabuse us of them. As young people, we are surrounded by expectations that may have little to do with who we really are, expectations held by people who are not trying to discern our selfhood but to fit us into slots. In families, schools, workplaces, and religious communities, we are trained away from true self towards images of acceptability; under social pressures like racism and sexism our original shape is deformed beyond recognition; and we ourselves, drive by fear, too often betray true self to gain the approval of others.”

Parker Palmer, Let Your Life Speak

My hope emerges from those places of struggle where I witness individuals positively transforming their lives and the world around them. Educating is always a vocation rooted in hopefulness. As teachers we believe that learning is possible, that nothing can keep an open mind from seeking after knowledge and finding a way to know.

bell hooks

Let your vocation change you. Let the sorrows and contradictions of each day challenge your weaknesses and cultivate your virtues. See in your vocation, in your feminine genius, how fulfilling the days can be when you have a supernatural outlook and offer your day to God."

Janet Quinlan, The Catholic Woman

Do everything possible so that liberty is victorious over oppression, justice over injustice, love over hate.

Ignacio Ellacuría

The Summer Day

Who made the world?
Who made the swan, and the black bear?
Who made the grasshopper?
This grasshopper, I mean-
the one who has flung herself out of the grass,
the one who is eating sugar out of my hand,
who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down-
who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes.
Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face.
Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away.
I don't know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me, what else should I have done?
Doesn't everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life?

Mary Oliver