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Intellectual Wellness

 

Eight Dimensions of Wellness

>Intellectual

Emotional

Physical

Social

Environmental

Occupational

Spiritual

Financial

Find mentors for intellectual wellbeing

Be sure to check out these departments as you seek to deepen your intellectual wellbeing

 

Academic Advisors 

Drahmann Academic Advising and Learning Resources Center staff who support students in intellectual wellbeing. To make an appointment with anyone on the Drahmann staff, please schedule through the "Make an appointment" button below.

Wendy Donohoe

Drahmann Faculty Advisor 

Garrison Dyer

Assistant Dean of Learning Resources 

Dr. Steve Fedder

Drahmann Faculty Advisor

Laura Fujieda

Dean, Academic Support Services and Director, Drahmann Center

Pancho Jiménez

Drahmann Faculty Advisor 

Charlotta Kratz

Drahmann Faculty Advisor 

Gunjan Malekar

University Advisor 

Dr. Brian McNelis

Drahmann Faculty Advisor 

Dr. Diana Morlang

Drahmann Faculty Advisor 

Lisa Osteraas

University Advisor 

Richard Rodgers

University Advisor

Find SCU staff who are available to serve as academic and intellectual mentors

When you click on any person below, you will find their bio and be able to set up a moment to talk individually. 

Anna Yang

University Library 

Bernell Nevil, III

Office for Multicultural Learning & Rainbow Resource Center

Cameron Barrilleaux

Center for Student Involvement 

Erin Kimura-Walsh, PhD

LEAD Scholars Program 

Dr. Jason Fitzer

Center for Student Involvement

Jessica Johns

Cowell Center

Kathryn Hutchings

Campus Recreation

Natasha Zubair

Residence Life

Nicole Banks

Cowell Center 

Ray Plaza

Office for Diversity and Inclusion

Tiger Simpson

Wellness Center

Dr. Timothy Leyson

Residence Life 

Resources to support your intellectual wellbeing

Intellectual Wellness 

inspires exploration and intellectual curiosity through participation in engaging and diverse scholastic, cultural, and community activities that build wellness and balance. When you have intellectual wellness, the world is truly yours.

Attributes that distinguish intellectual wellness

  • Lifelong learning 
  • Awareness of current events 
  • Creativity 
  • Critical thinking skills 
  • Educational goals 
  • Adaptation to change
  • Open-mindedness

Be sure to connect with faculty and staff during various opportunities for academic advising and office hours!

Anti-Racism Teaching Collective

Members of the Ethnic Studies department, Dr. Allia I. Griffin and Dr. Jesica S. Fernandez, along with recent alumni Khiely Jackson, BS ‘20, and Sydney Thompson, BS ‘20, curated a list of resources, readings, visual texts, poetry, and sociocultural artifacts to help support the development of an anti-racist vocabulary and praxis among all people.

In addition, you can find an archive of opportunities to engage in Racial Justice at the website for the Office of Diversity and Inclusion

Do you have the time to learn something new? 

LinkedIn Learning® allows you to learn what you want when you want. Select from thousands of beginner-to-advanced courses across core functional areas – including sales, marketing, finance, operations, IT, software and web development, customer service, and more. Request an SCU LinkedIn Learning account using this form. You must be signed in using your SCU username and password.

What is the SCU tUrn project? 

An interdisciplinary collaborative extending an invitation to all members of higher education institutions and partner networks, alumni & community members to lean into the climate crisis with urgency, creativity, and efficacy. Two key weeks of SCU tUrn engagement happen annually in October and April. 

Are you a current SCU Law student?

There's a variety of ways to build your intellectual wellness. To learn more about academic-focused centers that promote scholarship, faculty-supervised opportunities to develop lawyering skills, and additional ways to develop essential lawyering competencies, please visit SCU Law: Centers, Clinics, and Programs. In addition, you can network with other Law Students in one of the many Law School Student Organizations (LSOs)

Reflect on your intellectual self-care

Reflection questions

The reflection questions provided are based on the five steps of the Ignatian Examen: Give Thanks, Review, Reflect, Resolve, and Look Ahead.

1. Give Thanks

  • What project, paper, or course am I proud to have completed?
  • Who has been an influential teacher or professor in your education?
  • Is there any aspect of my SCU education that I have felt particularly grateful for?
  • Do I acknowledge the blessing that I have to be able to be working towards a college degree?

2. Review

  • What do I enjoy learning about?
  • How do I best learn?
  • Are there moments when I feel overwhelmed by all of my assignments? 
  • Am I spending enough time/not enough time on my academics?
  • How do I prioritize my courses, assignments, and studying?
  • What courses are especially interesting?

3. Reflect

  • Is there any class that I need to dedicate more time to?
  • Do my interests align with my major(s)?
  • Do I enjoy the content of my major(s)/minor(s)?
  • How do I study?
  • Am I comfortable asking my professors or peers for help when I don’t understand something?

4. Resolve

  • Is there a course that I could work harder at?
  • Have I taken advantage of on-campus resources (Drahmann Center, professor’s office hours, HUB)?
  • How could I be more prepared/study more effectively?

5. Look Ahead

  • What goals do I have for my courses this quarter?
  • Do I want to strive for a specific GPA?
  • Is there any specific course that is on my SCU bucket list?
  • How can I make the most of my time at SCU?

Intellectual wellness inventory

  • Do I know when my most productive time is for studying or completing assignments?
  • Do I take breaks when studying?
  • Is my day/week balanced so that no day or time becomes overwhelming?
  • Am I managing my time so I get to sleep on nights before a big exam or project is due?
Connect with others who share your intellectual interests

Regular opportunities to foster intellectual wellness

  • Tutoring (Drahmann)
  • Career fairs (Career Center)
  • SCU Bootcamp: "MY SELF CARE" (Intellectual wellness program by the Cowell Center)
  • Difficult Dialogues (Office for Multicultural Learning)
  • Book Clubs

Social accounts to follow

Check out the various RSOs (Registered Student Organizations) that share an intellectual interest, as well as the CSOs (Chartered Student Organizations) that serve all students. In addition, a number of academic and staff departments foster intellectual wellness, so be sure to follow them! 

 

  • SCU American Society of Mechanical Engineers - @scuasme
  • SCU American Society of Civil Engineers - @scu_asce
  • SCU Engineers Without Borders - @ewb.scu
  • SCU Maker Club - @scumakerclub
  • SCU National Society of Black Engineers
  • SCU Theta Tau Professional Engineering Fraternity - @scuthetatau
  • SCU Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE) - @shpe_scu
  • SCU Society of Women Engineers - @scuswe
  • SCU Women in STEM - @scuwinstem
Habits and practices to foster intellectual health

Habits of Health

  • Utilize Tutoring- Math Learning Center and Drahmann Center
  • Attend faculty office hours
  • Make a schedule and stick with it
  • Meet with academic and professional advisors and mentors

Take action

  • Participate in Career Fairs
  • Join a book club (Ignatian Center, Campus Ministry)
  • Subscribe to a news source
  • Use library databases
  • Participate in the Levl Up training on Camino
  • Utilize SCU's Bootcamp with the Cowell Center
  • Spend time studying, understanding, and taking action for social, environmental, and racial injustice

Suggestions

We would love to continue improving our Wellness Model pages. Please share with us your feedback, or comments as well as any articles, podcast, etc. that help you be well. Please make sure you are logged into your SCU gmail account to view this google form. If you have any other comments you can also email getconnected@scu.edu #BeWellBroncos