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Student Learning Outcomes by Undergraduate Program

College of Arts and Sciences

Goal 1. Anthropology students will understand the current central concerns of the anthropological subdisciplines of biological anthropology, archaeology, and cultural anthropology, and how they are applied.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate a proficiency in the fundamental concepts, theory, and methods of the subfields (e.g., by developing a literature review)
  • Demonstrate a broad, holistic awareness of the diversity of past and present cultures. This includes recognition of the varied social, cultural, and biological forces that shape human society and variation
  • Communicate anthropological issues and concerns effectively across a variety of media.

Goal 2. Anthropology students will apply the basics of field/lab/community research in the discipline and identify the theoretical, methodological, and ethical underpinnings of this work.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate familiarity with the theories, methods, and ethical considerations appropriate to particular research domains (e.g., through the development of a research paper or proposal).
  • Plan and conduct research in one or more of the subdisciplines of anthropology (e.g., archaeological lab/field work, ethnographic research, biomarkers, primate observation, etc.).
  • Use their knowledge of specific research domains to engage in research that foregrounds a commitment to community accessibility, collaboration, and/or participation.

Goal 3. Anthropology students will connect their knowledge and research to significant human issues.

Students will:

  • Assess how critical issues (e.g., poverty, health, migration, racism, gender-based violence, etc.) impact particular communities, through class research projects, community-based learning, field courses, and internships.
  • Critically examine the long-term development of and the internal and external responses to these issues
  • Assess how different understandings of human difference have real-world implications for the well-being of particular communities and for the shifting of long-standing power dynamics/hierarchies of knowledge production in the field.

Students will:

  • Explain the general developments of visual and material culture in the west and at least one other culture outside the traditional western canon.
  • Analyze and evaluate primary and secondary visual and textual sources using appropriately the vocabulary of the discipline of art history.
  • Explain connections between the visual properties of the object and its social, cultural, intellectual and historical contexts and meanings using appropriately the vocabulary of the discipline of art history. 
  • Describe the broad outlines of the history of the discipline as presented in the discipline’s foundational texts.
  • Apply and evaluate a variety of disciplinary and inter-disciplinary methods.
  • Describe the historical and/or ethical issues related to the collection and display of art.
  • Formulate a hypothesis, research it using appropriate research tools and indices,  develop it into a thesis, and present their work in both written and oral formats that display well-researched, well-argued/ supported, appropriately formatted, and professionally delivered presentations.

Students will:

  • Apply their knowledge of the core concepts in evolution to novel situations.
  • Apply their knowledge of the core concepts in structure/function to novel situations
  • Apply their knowledge of the core concepts in flow of information to novel situations
  • Apply their knowledge of the core concepts in transformation of energy and matter to novel situations
  • Apply their knowledge of the core concepts in systems to novel situations  
  • Use their skills in science as a process to apply their knowledge of core concepts
  • Use their skills in quantitative reasoning to apply their knowledge of core concepts
  • Use their skills in communication (oral and written) to apply their knowledge of core concepts
  • Use their skills in interdisciplinary collaboration to apply their knowledge of core concepts
  • Use their skills in modeling and simulation to apply their knowledge of core concepts
  • Use their skills in impact of science on society to apply their knowledge of core concepts

Goal 1: Scientific Reasoning: Students will demonstrate understanding of fundamental chemical concepts and have an ability to extend that knowledge to the solution of new problems in all chemistry subdisciplines (organic, inorganic, analytical, physical, and biochemical) through performance on assignments and exams (lecture setting) and laboratory experiments and reports (laboratory setting).

Students will:

  • Explain foundational principles of chemistry and biochemistry, including:
    • symbols and terminology (the language) of chemistry, 
    • sound mathematical concepts and be able to apply them to chemical systems
    • organization of the periodic table
    • atomic and quantum mechanical basis of chemical behavior
    • chemical bonding and structure/reactivity relationships
    • chemical kinetics and chemical equilibrium
    • descriptive chemistry and of practical and everyday chemistry
  • Apply principles of chemical reasoning to solve qualitative and quantitative problems or questions.
  • Interpret and analyze chemical datasets or case studies.

Goal 2: Laboratory Skills: Students will demonstrate a thorough knowledge of laboratory safety and experimental approaches to solving problems of a chemical nature while recognizing sustainable practices in the field.

Students will:

  • Design and perform controlled experiments to test hypotheses with knowledge of methods, instrumentation, and materials available.
  • Master a variety of safe standard laboratory procedures and operations, including proper chemical handling and waste disposal, including evaluation of the safest approaches for the scientist and society.
  • Use modern instruments and computational methods of analysis in chemical sciences.

Goal 3: Communication Skills: Students will demonstrate written and oral communication skills for presenting chemical information.

Students will:

  • Maintain detailed, accurate laboratory notebooks.
  • Prepare written and oral reports that communicate scientific results effectively, including displaying information clearly using graphs and tables.

Goal 4: Chemical Information Literacy: students will demonstrate their proficiency in the discipline through discovery of new knowledge and/or validation of existing knowledge in research or exploratory projects.

Students will:

  • Develop an appreciation of the importance of uncertainty in scientific measurements and develop the judgment to recognize that different levels of accuracy and reproducibility are appropriate in different settings.
  • Recognize and explain connections between chemical topics and everyday, “real world” situations.

Goal 5: Ethics and inclusivity: Students will understand that scientific work should be carried out honestly and objectively with a concern for the societal, ethical, and environmental aspects of the works. Students will demonstrate growth and understanding of the benefits of including scientists from a diverse, global society.

Goal 1: Graduates will demonstrate a broad and deep understanding of equity and power in the multiple, diverse contexts in which children live & learn.

Students will:

  • Analyze and critically reflect on how their own self-understanding in relation to race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, disability, and other categories of difference impacts their agency, identity, voice, values, power and sense of privilege.
  • Describe, interpret and critically reflect on how knowing and understanding not only a child’s multiple, diverse contexts but the child her/himself helps us consider the impact of systemic supports and inequities on various groups and individuals.
  • Analyze theories, concepts & research related to promising practices in leadership, advocacy and cultural competence within school and community settings.

Goal 2: Graduates will demonstrate foundational higher-order intellectual skills as they apply to school and community settings.

Students will:

  • Articulate ideas about children in school and community settings clearly and effectively through written/oral communication & other expressive media.
  • Analyze and interpret statistical research and data and employ quantitative reasoning to understand and benefit children in school and community settings.
  • Be critical thinkers who can analyze, reason, evaluate, problem-solve and make decisions with regard to children in school and community settings.
  • Identify relevant qualitative and quantitative information, locate information using library systems, evaluate information and appropriately apply information needed to benefit children in school and community settings.

Goal 3: Graduates will gain a broad and deep understanding through multiple lenses of the field of child studies in order to better serve, teach and support children in school and community settings.

Students will:

  • Recognize and discuss understandings of children holistically, from infancy to middle childhood, through multiple lenses/ perspectives such as the cognitive, creative, communal, socio-emotional, psychological, physical, sociological, intellectual and spiritual.
  • Analyze the varied behaviors and developmental cues of children in different contexts and situate some of the varieties of skills, behaviors and attitudes in relationship to normative or dominant discourses shaping schools and community agencies.
  • Synthesize and apply knowledge of children’s growth, resiliency and development within a variety of learning environments in order to address problems and propose solutions in school and community contexts.

Goal 1:  To provide major and minor programs, as well as core classes, that cultivate reflective thought among students in the best tradition of a liberal education

Students will:

  • Develop cross-disciplinary skills that enable them to collect and master various types of important data, to distinguish fact from opinion, and to make a cogent and compelling argument supported by the appropriate use of evidence.
  • Develop critical and self-critical thinking that enables them to identify and assess the personal and cultural assumptions that underlie social institutions.
  • Develop the disposition to use their informed reflection as a basis for engaging in responsible citizenship in the best humanistic tradition.
  • Students taking language courses should be able to use Greek and/or Latin as a model for understanding language structure in general, and for developing a deeper understanding of the nexus between language and culture.

Goal 2: To foster campus-wide exposure to and study of the classical worlds and Western culture

Students will:

  • Know the classical sources that form the core of Western culture.
  • Be able to articulate and reflect maturely upon the characteristic aspects and values of Western culture.

Students will:

  • Explain and apply communication theories, perspectives, principles, and concepts.
  • Critically analyze messages.
  • Analyze how communication maintains power and privilege, relevant to diversity, equity, and inclusion
  • Analyze the ethical dimensions of communication and form judgments and practices based on evidence and values.
  • Demonstrate research skills including the ability to formulate research questions, interpret, and evaluate communication research.
  • Create oral, visual, or written communication based on awareness of diverse perspectives, contexts, and/or social identities.
  • Design communication that fosters a more just, humane, or sustainable world. 
  • Integrate, synthesize, and reflect on how the study of Communication prepares for life-long learning and active civic engagement in a diverse world.

Goal 1: Connect the study of mathematics and computer science to other disciplines. 

Students will:

  • Obtain skills and logical perspectives in our introductory (core) courses that prepare them for subsequent courses inside and outside our department. Specifically, students will develop proficiency with the techniques of mathematics and/or computer science, the ability to evaluate logical arguments, and the ability to apply mathematical methodologies to solving real world problems.

Goal 2: Understand the foundations of Computer Science and appreciate some of its theoretical and applied uses. 

Students will:

  • Develop a strong foundation in programming, software development and data manipulation and become familiar with theoretical aspects of computer science.
  • Acquire a strong facility for developing, analyzing, and applying algorithms.

Goal 1: To prepare Physics and Engineering Physics majors, and other science and engineering students, for success in graduate school, professional school, or a career in their chosen field.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate appropriate competence and a working knowledge of classical physics, including the areas of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, and modern physics, including the areas of atomic physics, solid state physics, statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics.
  • Demonstrate competence in the physics laboratory, including a working knowledge of basic electronics and the ability to work independently.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and apply the appropriate analytic, numerical, computational, and other mathematical tools necessary to solve physics problems.

Goal 2: To immerse students, particularly non-science majors taking physics in order to satisfy Core requirements, in the methods of inquiry that citizens of the 21st century require to become active participants and to assume leadership roles in an increasingly scientific and technological world.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze scientific problems, generate logical hypotheses, evaluate evidence, and tolerate ambiguity.

Goal 3: To insure that Physics and Engineering-Physics majors, and other science and engineering students, are aware of the importance of physics in today's world and society, and to see the connections between science, events, and physical phenomena.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of physics in one area to make appropriate intellectual connections and solve problems in other areas of physics or other fields.
  • Demonstrate a familiarity with the current state of research in one or more subfields of physics, including the most significant research questions being pursued by today’s physicists.

Goal 4: To prepare Physics and Engineering Physics majors, and other science and engineering students, to communicate scientific ideas effectively.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate scientific information effectively in written and oral formats.

Goal 1: Students demonstrate an ability to read a variety of kinds of texts critically, precisely, and with rhetorical awareness.

Students will:

  • Analyze texts on the basis of literary history, conventions, and genres.
  • Analyze texts as social and material products and processes, informed by theories of rhetoric, literacy, and/or composing.  

Goal 2: Students demonstrate an ability to produce various kinds of texts precisely, effectively, and creatively.

Students will:

  • Produce texts as social and material products and processes, informed by theories of rhetoric, literacy, and/or composing.  
  • Create rhetorically effective texts through an intentional, reflective composing process that engage a defined audience; aim at a defined purpose; and use context-appropriate language, media, and genre.

Environmental Studies

Students will:

  • Recognize the relationships that link biophysical and social processes which shape
    environmental problems.
  • Integrate concepts from the biophysical and social sciences to address environmental issues, injustices and advance the common good.
  • Critically evaluate environmental issues and propose policy responses.
  • Collaborate and communicate with people from diverse backgrounds to examine human-environment relationships.
  • Produce and interpret environmental data using the appropriate mixed methods.

Environmental Science

Students will:

  • Apply the scientific method in designing, conducting and evaluating environmental research.
  • Apply principles from the life sciences and physical sciences to understand Earth's environment.
  • Produce and interpret environmental data using the appropriate methods and statistics.
  • Understand how cultural, socio-economic, political, and ethical contexts impact progress toward just environmental solutions.
  • Evaluate sources of information for quality, relevance, and fairness.
  • Communicate complex environmental issues to diverse audiences.

Engaging Positionality

Students will:

  • Question, challenge, and evaluate their prior knowledge about the history of racial/ethnic communities.
  • Deconstruct privilege and affirm racial and ethnic marginalized communities.

Knowledge of Historical and Contemporary Formations of Race and Ethnicity

Students will:

  • Describe historical formations of race and ethnicity in the US, including the impact of laws and public policies on racial and ethnic communities.
  • Describe various types of cultural production by members of racial and ethnic communities.
  • Define and apply concepts, terminology, and theoretical frameworks central to the interdisciplinary field of Ethnic Studies.

Critical Thinking about Race and Ethnicity

Students will:

  • Analyze how "race," "ethnicity," and/or indigeneity are historically and culturally specific (dependent on time and place); relational (nor formed in isolation); and intersectional.
  • Analyze differences in power and privilege related to race and ethnicity, and intersectional modes of subordination.
  • Analyze and engage with creative expressions and cultural productions in relation to social, historical, and political formations of racial and ethnic communities.

Multidisciplinary and Interdisciplinary Ethnic Studies Methods

Students will:

  • Identify, synthesize, and utilize interdisciplinary perspectives
  • Utilize (identify, synthesize, and integrate) interdisciplinary perspectives to analyze the experience and status of racial and ethnic communities and the process of racialization.

Leadership in Promoting Social Justice

Students will:

  • Identify concepts, definitions, and strategies that prepare themselves and others to live and work meaningfully, ethically, and effectively in a multiracial society.
  • Evaluate how individual and collective action has and can be used to create social change and racial justice.
  • Articulate a vision of social change and social justice rooted in ethnic studies that produces transformational change.

Goal 1: An understanding of one’s own and other cultures in a global context

Students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the broad context of human experience as expressed in the systematic and analytical comprehension of differing approaches to the historical discipline.

Goal 2: Critical thinking and expression

Students will:

  • Demonstrate a mastery of critical thinking, problem solving, written and oral communication, as well as practical skills.

Goal 3: Preparation for global citizenship

Students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the historical contexts that have shaped contemporary peoples, regions, nations, and societies.

Goal 1: Connect the study of mathematics and computer science to other disciplines. 

Students will:

  • Obtain skills and logical perspectives in our introductory (core) courses that prepare them for subsequent courses inside and outside our department. Specifically, students will develop proficiency with the techniques of mathematics and/or computer science, the ability to evaluate logical arguments, and the ability to apply mathematical methodologies to solving real world problems.

Goal 2: Appreciate and develop facility with mathematical structures. 

Students will:

  • Be able to understand and write rigorous arguments (i.e., proofs) for theorems.
  • Show mastery in the three basic areas of mathematics: analysis, algebra, and topology /geometry on a basic level in lower division courses and at an advanced level in upper division courses.

Goal 1: Students demonstrate communicative and intercultural competence through proficiency-based language programs in Arabic, Chinese, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Spanish.

  • Students completing their first year of language study demonstrate the following proficiency levels:  Arabic, Chinese, Japanese: Novice-Low or higher; German: Novice-Mid or higher; French, Italian, Spanish: Novice-High or higher.
  • Graduating majors in French, Italian, and Spanish reach the level of Advanced of proficiency.

Goal 2: Appropriate to the level of language studied, students demonstrate knowledge and understanding of other cultures throughout the program.

Students will:

  • Display and / or explain cultural behavior appropriate to the language and cultures of study through direct and mediated communication with members from the target culture.
  • Work with a variety of cultural texts in the target language to learn about and reflect on the artistic, historical, political and social perspectives of the language and cultures studied.   

Goal 3: Appropriate to the level of language studied, students demonstrate knowledge and critical understanding of literary trends and visual, cultural texts.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the major literary movements and genres of the literature of the target language within their historical, social, and political contexts.
  • Analyze, evaluate, and interpret a wide range of literary, visual, and cultural texts using a variety of rhetorical and literary techniques.

Goal 4:  Students seeking a teaching career in Spanish demonstrate linguistic and pedagogical knowledge and competence of the target language.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the nature and use of language as well as theories of language acquisition and learning.
  • Gain knowledge about methods, techniques for designing, implementing and evaluating instruction in Spanish using community and technology resources.

Goal 5: Students demonstrate cross-disciplinary learning and integrated education

Students will:

  • Critically read and discuss authentic second language texts to increase their knowledge of other disciplines (e.g. anthropology, business, education, health, history, law, political science, sociology, etc.)
  • Participate in multilingual communities at home or abroad to develop first-hand communication skills and cultural knowledge and competence.

Goal 6: Students develop a global mindset

Students will:

  • Demonstrate sensitivity to cultural norms and differences
  • Engage in cultural connections and demonstrate ability to adjust to new environments

Goal 1: Performance Experience

Students will:

  • Participate in performance through their course of study in applied (private) instruction and department ensembles.

Goal 2: Musicianship Skills and Music Theory

Students will:

  • Students will develop fluency in music theory and musicianship, identifying principles of melody, harmony, rhythm, and acoustics, articulated through notation, ear training, sight singing, keyboard skills, score analysis, and creative work.

Goal 3: Knowledge of Historical and Cultural Context

Students will:

  • Students will identify, explain, and analyze diverse musical traditions, including the historical and socio-cultural context of music from an array of genres, traditions, and eras.

Goal 4: Original Creative Work

Students will:

  • Students will create original music through improvisation, performance, composition, and collaboration using a variety of musical resources and technologies.

Goal 5: Knowledge and Fluency with Music Technology

Students will:

  • Students will demonstrate a working knowledge of music technology and its applications.

Students will: 

  • Demonstrate a solid understanding of basic neuroanatomy and nervous system function on a molecular, cellular, systems level.
  • Describe major areas of neuroscience with a clear understanding of the main research approaches, techniques, and topics.
  • Develop a high level of scientific literacy and quantitative, analytical skill so as to competently judge the scientific merit of original research and its representation by popular media.
  • Apply critical thinking skills to formulate novel scientific questions and incorporate the appropriate analytical research methodologies to address them.
  • Clearly present the results of a scientific study or a proposed experimental design in standard scientific written and oral formats.
  • Communicate effectively about neuroscience in written and oral form to both specialized and broad audiences.
  • Develop an understanding of the interdisciplinary nature of neuroscience.
  • Develop professional direction for post-graduate life through experiences within the major.
  • Evaluate the discipline of neuroscience critically within a larger cultural, socio-historical, and ethical framework

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the critical thinking skills necessary to identify, formulate and evaluate arguments across diverse discursive contexts.
  • Apply normative philosophical frameworks to the reasonable evaluation of moral problems.
  • Identify major philosophical figures and articulate central concepts and themes in the history of philosophy.
  • Formulate, justify and defend their own philosophical positions, both verbally and in writing, in increasingly sophisticated ways.

Goal 1: To prepare Physics and Engineering Physics majors, and other science and engineering students, for success in graduate school, professional school, or a career in their chosen field.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate appropriate competence and a working knowledge of classical physics, including the areas of mechanics, electricity and magnetism, thermodynamics, optics, and modern physics, including the areas of atomic physics, solid state physics, statistical mechanics, and quantum mechanics.
  • Demonstrate competence in the physics laboratory, including a working knowledge of basic electronics and the ability to work independently.
  • Demonstrate the ability to identify and apply the appropriate analytic, numerical, computational, and other mathematical tools necessary to solve physics problems.

Goal 2: To immerse students, particularly non-science majors taking physics in order to satisfy Core requirements, in the methods of inquiry that citizens of the 21st century require to become active participants and to assume leadership roles in an increasingly scientific and technological world.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to analyze scientific problems, generate logical hypotheses, evaluate evidence, and tolerate ambiguity.

Goal 3: To insure that Physics and Engineering-Physics majors, and other science and engineering students, are aware of the importance of physics in today's world and society, and to see the connections between science, events, and physical phenomena.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to apply knowledge of physics in one area to make appropriate intellectual connections and solve problems in other areas of physics or other fields.
  • Demonstrate a familiarity with the current state of research in one or more subfields of physics, including the most significant research questions being pursued by today’s physicists.

Goal 4: To prepare Physics and Engineering Physics majors, and other science and engineering students, to communicate scientific ideas effectively.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to communicate scientific information effectively in written and oral formats.

Analytical Skills

Students will:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of political science theories/models and an ability to apply them to the analysis of concepts, texts, policies, or institutions across the multiple subfields of political science.

Information Literacy Skills

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to find information and scholarship on political issues, as well as to evaluate the accuracy of those materials.

Research Skills

Students will:

  • Demonstrate the ability to formulate clear research questions and to answer them through the collection and interpretation of qualitative and/or quantitative data.

Writing Skills

Students will:

  • Develop effective written arguments that are grammatically correct, make appropriate use of evidence, and demonstrate sensitivity to audience and opposing perspectives.

Presentation Skills

Students will:

  • Create effective oral presentations that are poised, engaging, and make appropriate use of technology.

Civic Engagement Skills

Students will:

  • Demonstrate increased skills in civic engagement through active learning in the classroom and/or experiential learning outside the classroom

Goal 1: Knowledge Base

Students will:

  • Clearly describe key concepts, principles, and overarching themes across the main subfields of psychology.
  • Demonstrate their understanding of the knowledge base by correctly identifying the concepts, principles and themes in applied scenarios.

Goal 2: Scientific Inquiry and Critical Thinking

Students will:

  • Critically evaluate information relevant to human behavior from popular sources they are likely to encounter in daily life.
  • Critically evaluate information published in professional sources, such as peer-reviewed journals.
  • Formulate testable hypotheses derived from theories, demonstrating this skill for different types of designs (e.g., descriptive, correlational, experimental).
  • Propose valid research methods designed to test different kinds of hypotheses and create materials to implement specific research protocols derived from their designs.
  • Create visualizations of data, using common statistical software packages, that are appropriate for different types of designs and measures.
  • Determine an appropriate analytic approach, given a research design, and implement that approach using current statistical software or other tools relevant to the design.
  • Accurately describe patterns of observations, to include charts, graphs, tables.

Goal 3: Understand and Apply Ethical Principles

Students will:

  • Describe the procedures that research psychologists follow to ensure participants’ rights are respected.
  • Demonstrate understanding of how research procedures reflect adherence to the core ethics principles of the APA.

Goal 4: Understand Diverse Perspectives

Students will:

  • Describe the value of including diverse perspectives, broadly defined, in psychological research.
  • Identify limitations or strengths to the external validity of empirical studies, with respect to diversity.

Goal 5: Communicate Effectively

Students will:

  • Summarize and integrate information from scientific sources, expressing their findings in writing, to both professional and general audiences.
  • Summarize and integrate information from scientific sources, expressing their findings in an oral presentation, to both professional and general audiences.
  • Work cooperatively with others, seeking involvement and feedback from all team members, and responding to others respectfully and in a timely manner.

Goal 6: Explore Career Pathways for Psychology Majors

Students will:

  • Demonstrate awareness of the variety of careers open to psychology majors and demonstrate skills needed for exploring meaningful vocational pathways.

Goal 1. Students will demonstrate functional knowledge of multifactorial determinants of human health, and their relationship to health disparities.

Students will:

  • Evaluate the impact of human biology, behavior, culture, social and political activity, and economic factors on population health.
  • Evaluate the impact of environmental factors, both natural and anthropogenic, on human health.
  • Recognize health disparities within and between populations, and understand how to analyze within a given context the contributions of diverse factors potentially underlying health disparities.

Goal 2. Students will achieve proficiency in application of the scientific method, techniques for data collection, and strategies for effective data analysis in public health.

Students will:

  • Demonstrate basic mathematical skills underlying research in natural and social sciences.
  • Appropriately apply scientific reasoning and methods of inquiry to scientific questions
  • Apply the analytical framework and tools of epidemiology to understanding human health.
  • Recognize the complexities and interdisciplinary nature of public health issues, apply diverse scientific and analytical approaches to complex public health problems, and recognize the limits of data collection and analysis in addressing complex challenges.

Goal 3. Students will demonstrate foundational knowledge in biology and chemistry, and the connection between these disciplines and understanding human health.

Students will:

  • Recognize major infectious and non-infectious diseases that affect human populations.
  • Analyze and explain fundamental chemical processes at the molecular and macroscopic level to enhance their understanding of human health and disease.
  • Analyze and explain fundamental physiological, genetic, and evolutionary processes as they operate in biological systems.
  • Demonstrate a specific understanding of human physiology at a level sufficient to explain healthy and diseased states.

Goal 4. Students will demonstrate an understanding of health systems and policy, and practical approaches to addressing public health challenges.

Students will:

  • Describe the scope and diversity of national and sub-national systems for health care, and the role of public policy in addressing health issues within populations.
  • Evaluate the legal and regulatory dimensions of public health policy, and the manner in which these affect health outcomes.
  • Develop strategies to improve population health through needs assessment, planning of interventions, and implementation of public health programs in real-world situations.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of public health interventions.
  • Apply ethical principles to public health policy, research, and practice.

Goal 5. Students will demonstrate the ability to communicate effectively in the context of public health.

Students will:

  • Articulate public health concepts to non-expert audiences using diverse communication strategies to effectively promote improved health outcomes.
  • Demonstrate effective communication of public health issues to professional audiences.
  • Design and assess appropriate uses of mass and social media and electronic technologies in health communication.

Goal 6. Through their cumulative educational experience within and beyond the classroom...

Students will:

  • Develop critical thinking capacity for the analyzing and addressing difficult public health problems that require creative, interdisciplinary solutions.
  • Recognize injustices and inequalities evident in contemporary society, and develop a commitment to actively address health disparities facing disadvantaged and underserved communities, both locally and globally.
  • Recognize diverse professional opportunities within the field of public health, and have sufficient understanding of the nature of various positions and required job skills to be able to make informed decisions on career directions and/or post-graduate education.

Goal 1: Students graduating with a major in religious studies will understand religion as multidimensional and the field of religious studies as interdisciplinary.

Students will:

  • Identify and describe what constitutes the academic study of religion: the history of the field, the differences between religious studies and theology, and the multiple phenomena practitioners examine.

Goal 2: Students graduating with a major in religious studies will have a proficiency in research methods in the disciplines of religious studies, including field research.

Students will:

  • Apply disciplinary approaches to the analysis and interpretation of religious phenomena, and design a capstone project with one or more of these approaches.
  • Recognize religious phenomena in a lived context and interpret the phenomena with disciplinary concepts or methods.

Goal 3: Students graduating with a major in religious studies will understand the relationship of Christian theology to other religious and non-religious contexts.

Students will:

  • Identify and explain key features of the Christian tradition, especially the Roman Catholic tradition, in two different historical or cultural contexts.
  • Compare and contextualize central beliefs and practices of at least two different religious traditions, at least one of which will be non-Christian.

Students will:

  • Apply evidence-based solutions in business, public sector, human service, and community contexts to promote the common good,
  • Understand the forces of change and resistance to change in an increasingly diverse society,
  • Pursue methodologically and theoretical sophisticated research to reflect about social problems today, and
  • Critically examine the complex social and cultural realities that shape the human condition.

Goal 1. Technical Competence: Graduating studio majors will demonstrate technical competency in one or more mediums necessary to realize their artistic vision.

Students will:

  • Produce a body of work in each course that demonstrates proficiency within the context of the course curriculum.
  • Exhibit a technically proficient body of original artwork in a Senior Show (or similar public presentation).

Goal 2. Conceptual Competence: Graduating studio majors will demonstrate an ability to creatively synthesize ideas in the production of a work of art.

Students will:

  • Generate original works that reveal conceptual development and planning.
  • Exhibit a body of original artwork demonstrating conceptual consistency and continuity in a Senior Show (or similar public presentation).

Goal 3. Critical Analysis: Graduating studio majors will demonstrate an ability to analyze critically their own art work and the artwork of others.

Students will:

  • Actively engage in critical dialogue of their own artwork and the work of others during regularly scheduled course critiques and discussions.
  • Articulate an artist's statement for student's Senior Show or similar presentation of work.

Goal 4. Basic understanding of the development of western art embedded within its historical context from the ancient through the modern world.

  • All studio majors are required to take ARTH 11, 12, & 13.
  • ARTH 183 (Post-War Art of Europe and America) is highly recommended for studio majors.

Goal 1. Effective Presence Upon completion of the Theatre and Dance program, students will be able to express ideas effectively in artistically compelling performances and/or presentations. 

Students will:

  • Demonstrate verbal and physical eloquence—strength, confidence, clarity and passion—in the quality and technique of performed/presented work. 

Goal 2. Critical, Creative and Integrative Thinking Upon completion of the Theatre and Dance program, students will have analyzed theatre arts topics through the process of critique, created works, designs or plans, as well as synthesized different areas of knowledge. 

Students will:

  • Demonstrate critical, analytical thinking in written and oral presentations on performance events, historical periods, justice issues, and other theatre arts topics.
  • Demonstrate creative thinking through the generation of unprecedented, imaginative, original work not relying solely on pre-existing elements or ideas, and demonstrate creative problem-solving in any of the multiple areas of the theatre arts.
  • Demonstrate integrative thinking through the synthesis of research, creative process, and assemblages of elements in the development of processes or the creation of projects. 

Goal 3. Leadership - Drawing upon the integral components of an artistic process--sensitivity, generosity, creativity, empathy and inter-disciplinary communication-- students will develop leadership skills in executing a vision or concept, organizing time and process, building an ensemble (team). 

Students will:

  • Be able to describe the experience of serving in program-related leadership roles and explain the development of their artistic vision or project and which skills (organizational, interpersonal, research, entrepreneurial, etc.) they utilized to achieve their goals. 

Goal 4. Discipline - Upon completion of the Theatre and Dance program, students will demonstrate responsible, professional work habits, contribute constructively to group processes and show evidence of understanding the interdependent relationships of all facets of theatrical/dance production. 

Students will:

  • Demonstrate responsible, professional work habits in timeliness, readiness and initiative.
  • Contribute constructively to group processes through attitude/behavior toward ensemble work & demonstration of complex problem-solving capabilities.
  • Understand and participate in interdependent relationships of theatre and dance disciplinary areas by functioning effectively in live production contexts and is versed in multiple dimensions of the performing arts. 

Goal 5 : Reflection - Upon completion of the Theatre and Dance program, students will have examined both familiar and less familiar traditions, practices and applications of the theatre arts that help them reflect on the roles of history, social justice, spirituality, creativity, diversity, and sustainability. 

Students will:

  • Analyze, synthesize and reflect as artists verbally, in writing or through multimedia presentations on their evolving understandings of the relationship between themselves and diverse spheres of thought and action. 

Goal 1: Students will understand gender as an element of social, political, economic and legal structures as well as individual identities, critically interrogating understandings of gender divisions as natural or socially constructed.

Students will:

  • Describe the social construction of gender, sex, sexuality, and disability.
  • Identify gender, privilege, and oppression as differently constructed through intersecting identities of race, ethnicity, class, religion, sexual orientation, age, nationality/citizenship, ability, and other critical variables.

Goal 2: Students will gain facility with disciplinary and interdisciplinary women’s and gender studies approaches and methods. 

Students will:

  • Critique the politics of traditional approaches to knowledge production.
  • Apply feminist theory to analysis of diverse topics.
  • Articulate principles and practices of feminist methodologies. 
  • Identify central debates within feminist theorizing across disciplines.

Goal 3: Students will understand both leadership and participation in gender and related social justice advocacy in local communities and a globalizing world.

Students will:

  1. Explain the role of activism in the service of gender justice and related issues.
  2. Identify important events, legislation, or court rulings which had a major impact on the status, treatment, and experiences of diverse groups.
  3. Analyze the ways in which legacies of colonialism and contemporary manifestations of globalization impact gender and social (in)justice within and across cultures.

School of Engineering

Program Goals:

Students will:

  • Demonstrate fundamental knowledge of engineering principles, mathematics and biosciences, working knowledge of and extensive hands-on experience with bioengineering practices.
  • Demonstrate an ability to formulate problems at the interface of engineering, biology and medicine and to provide effective solutions independently or through team efforts.
  • Demonstrate professional and ethical responsibility aimed at the identification of contemporary issues as they apply to bioengineering.

Program Learning Outcomes:

Basic Knowledge

Students will have:

  • Knowledge of engineering principles, mathematics and computational methods;
  • Knowledge of the hierarchy and organization of biological systems from molecules, cells, tissues to organs, and structure, function and regulation of genes and proteins;
  • Working knowledge of and extensive hands-on experience with bioengineering laboratory practices. 

Inquiry/Problem Solving/Professional Development

Students will have:

  • An ability to apply advanced mathematics, cutting edge computational techniques, science, and engineering to formulate and solve problems at the interface of engineering and biology; 
  • An ability to make measurements on and interpret data from living systems, addressing the problems associated with the interaction between living and nonliving materials, and to design, implement and evaluate bioprocesses, medical devices and bio-systems; 
  • Identify professional and ethical responsibilities of bioengineers and analyze contemporary ethical issues as they apply to bioengineering;
  • Recognize the impact of bioengineering solutions in a global and social context;
  • An ability to communicate effectively and work collaboratively;
  • An ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice. 

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

Students will:

  • Achieve success in their professional endeavors, equipped with the liberal education and technical expertise required for the creative practice or advanced study of computing, will be motivated to communicate and work effectively in diverse personal and professional settings, and will demonstrate an appreciation of lifelong learning through continued personal and professional development.
  • Understand their personal and professional ethical responsibilities, and will observe and promote the highest ethical standards.
  • Equipped with their knowledge of science and engineering, engage in activities that contribute to the benefit of society.

Students will have: 

  • an ability to apply knowledge of computing, mathematics, science, and engineering
  • an ability to design and conduct experiments, as well as to analyze and interpret data
  • an ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability
  • an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams to accomplish a common goal
  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  • an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility, including legal, security and social issues
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • the broad education necessary to understand the impact of computer-based engineering solutions on individuals and organizations in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context
  • a recognition of the need for, and an ability to engage in life-long learning and continuing professional development
  • a knowledge of contemporary issues
  • an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for computer-based engineering practice
  • an ability to apply mathematical foundations, algorithmic principles, and computer science theory in the modeling and design of computer-based systems in a way that demonstrates comprehension of the tradeoffs involved in design choices
  • an ability to apply design and development principles in the construction of software systems of varying complexity

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

The Department has developed a program with four specific educational objectives, namely that our graduates who have been out of school for two to five years will have:

  • Become successful professionals, applying the fundamental concepts of electrical and computer engineering science and engineering practice to the solution practical problems, within engineering or in another field.
  • Worked effectively within teams and communicated effectively to solve complex engineering problems, or other problems.
  • Acted with responsibility within society in light of the obligation that engineers have to design and develop effective products that are of positive value to society, and will have practiced leadership in advising society on the wisdom of specific developments, and will have acted with honesty and wisdom, with courage and compassion.
  • Been driven to continue learning by an inherent curiosity for discovery, enjoying and embracing lifelong learning as a necessity for personal growth and societal improvement.

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

The Department has developed a program with four specific educational objectives, namely that our graduates who have been out of school for two to five years will have:

  • Become successful professionals, applying the fundamental concepts of electrical and computer engineering science and engineering practice to the solution practical problems, within engineering or in another field.
  • Worked effectively within teams and communicated effectively to solve complex engineering problems, or other problems.
  • Acted with responsibility within society in light of the obligation that engineers have to design and develop effective products that are of positive value to society, and will have practiced leadership in advising society on the wisdom of specific developments, and will have acted with honesty and wisdom, with courage and compassion.
  • Been driven to continue learning by an inherent curiosity for discovery, enjoying and embracing lifelong learning as a necessity for personal growth and societal improvement.

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

Program Educational Objectives

Within a few years after graduation, our students will:

  • Become successful professionals, demonstrating their knowledge and depth of understanding of mechanical engineering in industry or further academic studies.
  • Develop ethical and innovative engineering solutions that meet our responsibilities to society and the environment, based on fundamental principles using modern analysis techniques, testing, and validation, and guided by the concepts of competence, conscience, and compassion.
  • Work in a team environment, communicate effectively, share their knowledge and expertise, and exercise leadership as appropriate.
  • Be dedicated to lifelong learning and personal growth for the betterment of society and to meet the challenges and obligations of tomorrow.

Student Learning Outcomes

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

Students will:

  1. Be able to analyze, design and improve the computational infrastructure of the World Wide Web.
  2. Develop interactive multimedia content that is appealing, engaging, effective and easy to use.
  3. Be guided by an understanding of and sensitivity to, the social, political, ethical and legal relationships between their work and those that it affects.

(ABET) Students will have:

  • an ability to identify, formulate, and solve complex engineering problems by applying principles of engineering, science, and mathematics
  • an ability to apply engineering design to produce solutions that meet specified needs with consideration of public health, safety, and welfare, as well as global, cultural, social, environmental, and economic factors
  • an ability to communicate effectively with a range of audiences
  • an ability to recognize ethical and professional responsibilities in engineering situations and make informed judgments, which must consider the impact of engineering solutions in global, economic, environmental, and societal contexts
  • an ability to function effectively on a team whose members together provide leadership, create a collaborative and inclusive environment, establish goals, plan tasks, and meet objectives
  • an ability to develop and conduct appropriate experimentation, analyze and interpret data, and use engineering judgment to draw conclusions
  • an ability to acquire and apply new knowledge as needed, using appropriate learning strategies

Leavey School of Business

Goal 1. Financial reporting for external users

Students will:

  • Understand the environment and theoretical structure of financial reporting
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the classification, timing, measurement (valuation) and reporting of balance sheet and income statement items
  • Understand the fundamentals of consolidation

Goal 2. Internal uses of financial data for decision-making

Students will:

  • Understand and apply common cost allocation processes
  • Consider relevant costs for decision making purposes
  • Calculate product costs 

Goal 3. Auditing

Students will:

  • Identify the sources of auditing regulation
  • Apply the audit risk model to audit planning
  • Evaluate auditor adherence to appropriate regulation in a case study setting
  • Understand the concept of sampling risk and its applicability to statistical and non-statistical sampling

Goal 4. Fundamental income tax rules for individuals and enterprises

Students will:

  • Determine gross income of individual taxpayers
  • Calculate basic deductions for individual taxpayers and sole proprietorships
  • Understand property basis and apply concepts to basic situations
  • Identify tax issues in transaction-based fact patterns encountered in compliance and planning situations

Goal 5. Accounting Information Systems

Students will:

  • Identify internal control weaknesses and select appropriate elements of an internal control system to remediate
  • Understand and apply internal control concepts to basic situations
  • Demonstrate the ability to create a simple computerized accounting system, store and extract accounting information

Goal 6. Apply critical thinking skills to the analysis of an accounting issue

Students will:

  • Identify the key assumptions of the issue
  • Evaluate the information provided and correctly identify what information is pertinent to the problem
  • Apply appropriate accounting concepts or tools to produce a proposed solution

Goal 7. Apply ethical frameworks to accounting-related issues

Students will:

  • Understand the primary rules of professional conduct applicable to accountants
  • Identify ethical issues in accounting contexts
  • Apply ethical frameworks to the analysis of ethical issues
  • Develop an appropriate recommendation for a course of action, supported by reference to professional codes of conduct and ethical frameworks.

Goal 8. Data analytics

Students will:

  • Understand database structures common to financial accounting systems
  • Identify and assess effectiveness of key internal control procedures
  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare data for further analysis
  • Analyze data to discover meaningful patterns and identify relevant recommendations

Goal 1. Financial reporting for external users

Students will:

  • Understand the environment and theoretical structure of financial reporting
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the classification, timing, measurement (valuation) and reporting of balance sheet and income statement items
  • Understand the fundamentals of consolidation

Goal 2. Internal uses of financial data for decision-making

Students will:

  • Understand and apply common cost allocation processes
  • Consider relevant costs for decision making purposes
  • Calculate product costs 

Goal 3. Auditing

Students will:

  • Identify the sources of auditing regulation
  • Apply the audit risk model to audit planning
  • Evaluate auditor adherence to appropriate regulation in a case study setting
  • Understand the concept of sampling risk and its applicability to statistical and non-statistical sampling

Goal 4. Fundamental income tax rules for individuals and enterprises

Students will:

  • Determine gross income of individual taxpayers
  • Calculate basic deductions for individual taxpayers and sole proprietorships
  • Understand property basis and apply concepts to basic situations
  • Identify tax issues in transaction-based fact patterns encountered in compliance and planning situations

Goal 5. Accounting Information Systems

Students will:

  • Identify internal control weaknesses and select appropriate elements of an internal control system to remediate
  • Understand and apply internal control concepts to basic situations
  • Demonstrate the ability to create a simple computerized accounting system, store and extract accounting information

Goal 6. Apply critical thinking skills to the analysis of an accounting issue

Students will:

  • Identify the key assumptions of the issue
  • Evaluate the information provided and correctly identify what information is pertinent to the problem
  • Apply appropriate accounting concepts or tools to produce a proposed solution

Goal 7. Apply ethical frameworks to accounting-related issues

Students will:

  • Understand the primary rules of professional conduct applicable to accountants
  • Identify ethical issues in accounting contexts
  • Apply ethical frameworks to the analysis of ethical issues
  • Develop an appropriate recommendation for a course of action, supported by reference to professional codes of conduct and ethical frameworks.

Goal 8. Data analytics

Students will:

  • Understand database structures common to financial accounting systems
  • Identify and assess effectiveness of key internal control procedures
  • Demonstrate the ability to prepare data for further analysis
  • Analyze data to discover meaningful patterns and identify relevant recommendations

Goal 1. Ethical, global, and sustainability considerations in business

Students will:

  • Describe ethical dilemmas in business, including DEI and utilization of AI, and identify and articulate an ethically justifiable response, using appropriate ethical frameworks.
  • Describe and critically evaluate roles of corporate social responsibility, stakeholders, and sustainability in modern business with a focus on climate change.
  • Assess global economic trends, international financial links, and key drivers of international trade and competition, and climate change implications of global trade.
  • Describe and analyze international differences in business environments.

Goal 2. Connection to Silicon Valley: innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship

Students will:

  • Identify and evaluate alternative business models of special relevance to innovative firms.
  • Analyze the degree to which technology firms, and innovative companies, have distinctive needs in respect to standard business functions, meaning accounting, finance, marketing, management, manufacturing, information technology, and analytics.
  • Describe typical trajectories for successful startups to become industry leaders.

Goal 3. Communication, interpersonal, and team-building skills

Students will:

  • Write clear, well-documented, and effective memoranda and reports.
  • Prepare and deliver professional-quality presentations.
  • Work effectively on a project in a team.

Goal 4. Analysis to drive decision making

Students will:

  • Select and apply appropriate analytical techniques, models, use of scripting, and frameworks to business decisions.
  • Summarize and analyze quantitative information using statistics and data visualization.

Goal 5. Understanding contemporary business: internal organization and external environment

Students will:

Goal 1. Ethical, global, and sustainability considerations in business

Students will:

  • Describe ethical dilemmas in business, including DEI and utilization of AI, and identify and articulate an ethically justifiable response, using appropriate ethical frameworks.
  • Describe and critically evaluate roles of corporate social responsibility, stakeholders, and sustainability in modern business with a focus on climate change.
  • Assess global economic trends, international financial links, and key drivers of international trade and competition, and climate change implications of global trade.
  • Describe and analyze international differences in business environments.

Goal 2. Connection to Silicon Valley: innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship

Students will:

  • Identify and evaluate alternative business models of special relevance to innovative firms.
  • Analyze the degree to which technology firms, and innovative companies, have distinctive needs in respect to standard business functions, meaning accounting, finance, marketing, management, manufacturing, information technology, and analytics.
  • Describe typical trajectories for successful startups to become industry leaders.

Goal 3. Communication, interpersonal, and team-building skills

Students will:

  • Write clear, well-documented, and effective memoranda and reports.
  • Prepare and deliver professional-quality presentations.
  • Work effectively on a project in a team.

Goal 4. Analysis to drive decision making

Students will:

  • Select and apply appropriate analytical techniques, models, use of scripting, and frameworks to business decisions.
  • Summarize and analyze quantitative information using statistics and data visualization.

Goal 5. Understanding contemporary business: internal organization and external environment

Students will:

Goal 1. Ethical, global, and sustainability considerations in business

Students will:

  • Describe ethical dilemmas in business, including DEI and utilization of AI, and identify and articulate an ethically justifiable response, using appropriate ethical frameworks.
  • Describe and critically evaluate roles of corporate social responsibility, stakeholders, and sustainability in modern business with a focus on climate change.
  • Assess global economic trends, international financial links, and key drivers of international trade and competition, and climate change implications of global trade.
  • Describe and analyze international differences in business environments.

Goal 2. Connection to Silicon Valley: innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship

Students will:

  • Identify and evaluate alternative business models of special relevance to innovative firms.
  • Analyze the degree to which technology firms, and innovative companies, have distinctive needs in respect to standard business functions, meaning accounting, finance, marketing, management, manufacturing, information technology, and analytics.
  • Describe typical trajectories for successful startups to become industry leaders.

Goal 3. Communication, interpersonal, and team-building skills

Students will:

  • Write clear, well-documented, and effective memoranda and reports.
  • Prepare and deliver professional-quality presentations.
  • Work effectively on a project in a team.

Goal 4. Analysis to drive decision making

Students will:

  • Select and apply appropriate analytical techniques, models, use of scripting, and frameworks to business decisions.
  • Summarize and analyze quantitative information using statistics and data visualization.

Goal 5. Understanding contemporary business: internal organization and external environment

Students will:

Goal 1. Ethical, global, and sustainability considerations in business

Students will:

  • Describe ethical dilemmas in business, including DEI and utilization of AI, and identify and articulate an ethically justifiable response, using appropriate ethical frameworks.
  • Describe and critically evaluate roles of corporate social responsibility, stakeholders, and sustainability in modern business with a focus on climate change.
  • Assess global economic trends, international financial links, and key drivers of international trade and competition, and climate change implications of global trade.
  • Describe and analyze international differences in business environments.

Goal 2. Connection to Silicon Valley: innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship

Students will:

  • Identify and evaluate alternative business models of special relevance to innovative firms.
  • Analyze the degree to which technology firms, and innovative companies, have distinctive needs in respect to standard business functions, meaning accounting, finance, marketing, management, manufacturing, information technology, and analytics.
  • Describe typical trajectories for successful startups to become industry leaders.

Goal 3. Communication, interpersonal, and team-building skills

Students will:

  • Write clear, well-documented, and effective memoranda and reports.
  • Prepare and deliver professional-quality presentations.
  • Work effectively on a project in a team.

Goal 4. Analysis to drive decision making

Students will:

  • Select and apply appropriate analytical techniques, models, use of scripting, and frameworks to business decisions.
  • Summarize and analyze quantitative information using statistics and data visualization.

Goal 5. Understanding contemporary business: internal organization and external environment

Students will:

Goal 1. Ethical, global, and sustainability considerations in business

Students will:

  • Describe ethical dilemmas in business, including DEI and utilization of AI, and identify and articulate an ethically justifiable response, using appropriate ethical frameworks.
  • Describe and critically evaluate roles of corporate social responsibility, stakeholders, and sustainability in modern business with a focus on climate change.
  • Assess global economic trends, international financial links, and key drivers of international trade and competition, and climate change implications of global trade.
  • Describe and analyze international differences in business environments.

Goal 2. Connection to Silicon Valley: innovation, technology, and entrepreneurship

Students will:

  • Identify and evaluate alternative business models of special relevance to innovative firms.
  • Analyze the degree to which technology firms, and innovative companies, have distinctive needs in respect to standard business functions, meaning accounting, finance, marketing, management, manufacturing, information technology, and analytics.
  • Describe typical trajectories for successful startups to become industry leaders.

Goal 3. Communication, interpersonal, and team-building skills

Students will:

  • Write clear, well-documented, and effective memoranda and reports.
  • Prepare and deliver professional-quality presentations.
  • Work effectively on a project in a team.

Goal 4. Analysis to drive decision making

Students will:

  • Select and apply appropriate analytical techniques, models, use of scripting, and frameworks to business decisions.
  • Summarize and analyze quantitative information using statistics and data visualization.

Goal 5. Understanding contemporary business: internal organization and external environment

Students will: