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Unbound: The Art of Deterioration

Photograph of accordion-style book art piece predominantly yellow and tan in color with blue and green rectangles.

Photograph of accordion-style book art piece predominantly yellow and tan in color with blue and green rectangles.

October 4 - December 6, 2019

(closed November 28 - December 2)

Through the deterioration of material and meaning, the artists included in this exhibition collectively question, manipulate, and expand the information communicated through the printed page. Working with books, book materials, and the printed text, they re-image the communicative nature of component parts. Their manipulation of book spines, cloth coverings, and text blocks, create new possibilities for processing and presenting information.

Some artists in this exhibition distill books into composite parts that as separate entities provide perhaps greater insight into a subject than the sum of their parts. Other artists manipulate the book form, expanding the qualities and connotations of books as repositories of information or call into question our reliance on and acceptance of texts without regard for their inherent biases. Others yet integrate new materials into books and printed documents, communicating more visceral information than text alone could provide. Collectively, these pieces help us to examine our own associations and explore new possibilities for “book learning.”

Unbound features artwork by Jody Alexander, Renee Billingslea, Terri Garland, Kio Griffith, Lisa Kokin, Sandi Miot, Julia Nelson-Gal, Lisa Occhipinti, Steph Rue, Vita Wells, Michelle Wilson, and Lori Zimmerman.

 
 
Image: Jody Alexander, Hemingway and the Art of Awareness, No. 6, 2017, from series Bibliomuse 1, linen, bookcloth from discarded Ernest Hemingway books, stencils, thread.
 
 
Jul 17, 2019

Opening Reception

Thursday, October 3, 2019

6:00-7:00 p.m. - Member Preview

7:00-8:30 p.m. - Public Opening Reception

 

At this event, we will also celebrate the opening of Making an Impression.