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Educational Leadership Course Descriptions

Educational Leadership Course Descriptions

CATE Objectives, including theories and concepts of leadership and their relationship to theory and practice. Understand and develop skills and strategies within the context of contemporary issues which include sustainable schools, student centered vision, use of data and sound teaching and learning for all students. Understanding skills to align the school vision with the local diocese or LEA. Develop skills and strategies for employee accountability, professional ethics and adapt personal skills needed for leadership and administration.

Development of individual views and understanding of leadership styles, strategies that include plans for self-development and a reflection of personal leadership styles.

This class will include an analysis of leadership theory, research and demonstrations of practical applications with regard to current leadership practices. Students will be actively engaged in analysis of their own leadership styles, strengths and challenges. They will also be able to identify requisite skills needed to assume administrative positions and to sustain healthy organizational cultures within an educational setting. Much of the focus of this class will be dedicated to the unique role and responsibilities of Catholic school leaders.

Syllabus:  

This course will focus on TK-12 CAPE content standards and their implications for the development of curriculum and instruction. This includes the use of assessments, teaching strategies and the appropriate blend of technology for teacher and students at all grade levels. There will be comprehensive demonstrations of best practices for instruction which will be modeled and discussed throughout this course. Students will understand the professional standards for implementing learning objectives which are meaningful, measurable and appropriate for grade levels.

Theories of curriculum and instruction will be weaved through this class including the understanding of readiness for college and career. Students will engage in developing their understanding of culturally safe learning environments, positive classrooms and will explore the practices for ELL and Special Needs Students.

In addition, students will understand how to use the influence and power inherent in a leadership position to enhance the educational program, promote learning for all student groups, strategically plan and make fair and appropriate decisions. Theories and strategies for communicating with and involving multiple constituencies in identifying student and school needs for working with others to improve student learning opportunities and outcomes for all students. Leadership responsibilities and professional accountability for assessment of teacher instruction will also be included in this course.

Syllabus: 

The course includes topics such as the improvement of educational institutions and other organizations as a result of improving management practices; avoiding old mistakes and facing problems and challenges associated with a changing, culturally diverse school population with confidence are considered. Discussions include goal setting and the role of the individual and institutions. Topics include government intervention in education, legislation, regulation and policymaking. The organization as a target of legislative reform is discussed. Solving problems before they become unsolvable and strategies for improving management are considered (from SECP Graduate Bulletin, 2016, p. 98).

Syllabus:

This course is part of the Educational Leadership sequence of study. The focus of this course is the examination of the issues of education, law and morality and ways in which the law, by its very nature, cannot be separated from ethics and morality. Theories of law and of the relationship between law and other social and ethical values are reviewed. The ability of leaders to have a better understanding of the law and the politics associated with governance and the ability to assist people to work through moral dilemmas associated with the law are considered. Cross-cultural communications, desegregation and discrimination, credentialing laws, assignment authorization, and schools as a political system are also examined.

Students will grapple with legal, ethical and practical challenges in organizational governance. Leadership issues will be explored and collaboratively practiced through technology-enhanced case study. Students will develop a sense of legal reasoning to minimize organizational risk and promote effective and justice-oriented decision-making for the communities in which they serve as leaders.

Syllabus: 

This course is the first of three leadership learning experiences centered on an approved and supervised embedded job experience or field placement in educational or nonprofit leadership. The course is built around weekly reflection and skill building, monthly seminars, and culminates in a field project and candidate evaluation. The candidate develops interpersonal and leadership skills in developing and leading the organization’s vision given the complex realities, multiple constituencies, and challenging interactions of the site. The candidate develops skills in shared leadership and change management and applies this to a site. The candidate coordinates organizational, legal, and ethical dimensions of leadership. This field lab extends and applies knowledge and skills developed in EDUC 360, 362, 363, and 428, and is ordinarily completed in the same program year as these courses. (3 units)

Syllabus: 

This course is part of the Educational Leadership sequence of study. It is intended to provide students with an introduction to the principles of human resource development and an overview of various supervision, evaluation, and leadership tools and strategies to support the cultivation of the people who make organizations work. Students will read empirical and conceptual works as well as a foundational guide for practitioners to anchor reflection and experiential learning related to managing human resources and organizational growth.

Students will grapple with legal, ethical and practical challenges in human resource management and collaboratively design plans to address such issues. Leadership issues will be explored and practiced including motivating individuals and teams, interviewing and hiring, conducting observations, designing improvement plans, nurturing a fair and inclusive environment, and creating a culture of performance and continuous improvement.

Syllabus:  EDUC 365

Exploring Community and Public Relations through the lens of visionary thinking and creative business strategies.

  • Partnership roles among school, business and community
  • Leading and initiating change through strategic planning
  • Strategies for positive relationships with internal and external school communities
  • Understanding how to best serve community through shared vision, and a variety of communication networks.
  • Identifying what an inclusive school community means and how to sustain this model.
  • Building knowledge and strategies for reaching out to the broader

Students will actively engage in strategic planning and projects throughout this course and will utilize the Business Canvas strategic models to create strategic initiatives for current realities and leadership positions.

Syllabus: 

EDUC 367, Contextual Field Lab, is the second of three leadership learning experiences centered on an approved and supervised embedded job experience or field placement in educational or nonprofit leadership. The course is built around weekly reflections, skill building, consulting with a supervisor and culminates in a field project with candidate evaluation. The candidate develops skill in the design, collection, and use of data for decision making and program improvement in the context of relevant professional standards and outcomes.

The candidate implements effective strategies for human resource development from recruiting and hiring through training and life-long development of relevant capacities. The contextual field lab focuses on developing candidate leadership and management skills in program assessment, design, delivery, evaluation, and modification, together with effective human resource development. This field lab extends and applies knowledge and skills developed in EDUC 361, 365, 368, and 371 and is ordinarily completed in the same program year. 3 units [Fall, Winter, Spring, Summer].

Syllabus: 

This course is part of the Educational Leadership sequence of study. It is intended to provide students with an introduction to program evaluation and the principles of assessment; it includes an overview of various assessment tools and strategies with a focus on data analysis and the use of evidence in decision-making. Students will read empirical and conceptual works as well as a foundational guide for practitioners to anchor reflection and experiential learning related to the principles of assessment and school improvement. The relevance and application of these principles for instructional leadership is explored, with an emphasis on the continuous school improvement framework in lieu of compliance-oriented reform. Students have the opportunity to gather comparative information through a well-designed process of assessment, analysis, and evaluation. Evidence and results will be analyzed within the appropriate context to determine judgment, size, and worth. Students will grapple with common misconceptions in assessment and the challenges, limitations, and possibilities that assessment holds for school improvement.

Leadership issues will be explored and practiced including building the credibility of results through careful choice of the evaluation design and assessment tools and communicating assessment results to myriad stakeholders in communities. Students will work collaboratively and individually to create a systematic accountability process and develop pragmatic steps to design, implement, evaluate and effectively promote school improvement.

Syllabus:

 

The course focuses on a spectrum of activities that focus on research, planning, theorizing, learning, and development in the resolution of a problem or problems. An understanding of the qualitative research principles, the dynamics associated with diversity and change and the need to study problems that are relevant in real settings while systematically inquiring, making hypotheses and testing these hypotheses; use as a vehicle for empowering teachers and learners. Approaches to scholarly inquiry. (3 units)

Syllabus:

This course is the first of three leadership learning experiences centered on an approved and supervised embedded job experience or field placement in educational or nonprofit leadership. The course is built around reflection and skill building, monthly seminars, and culminates in a field project and candidate evaluation. The candidate develops skills in the full range of leadership and management skills for forming sustainable organizations that serve their intended communities. The field lab focuses on effective management of technology, as well as finances, facilities and fundraising. This includes budgeting, financial reporting and meeting legal reporting requirements. The candidate engages in both learning from and serving the organizations and community stakeholders. This lab extends and applies knowledge and skills developed in previous courses taken in during the degree program.

Syllabus: 

The purpose of the Program Interventions course is for students to develop the knowledge and skills necessary to evaluate and select appropriate interventions to build a culture of inclusion within school and other environments. The emphasis is on effective, efficient, and socially valid models of intervention, primarily through Multi-Tiered Systems of Support. The course develops an understanding of program evaluation measures, and requires students to be able to demonstrate this knowledge for purposes of making data based decisions to develop intervention plans for a variety of learners including students with disabilities and other special concerns such as youth from foster, immigrant and migrant families, students who are at risk and students from language diverse communities. Synchronous and asynchronous class activities provide practice in the use of relevant interventions designed to effect continuous improvement in schools and other organizations. The course focuses on the role of educational leaders in serving students and building inclusive school communities and other organizations.

Syllabus: EDUC 371

This course explores current issues with regard to organizational culture and change. Topics to be explored include how organizational culture influences such things as making staffing decisions, using data driven professional development, understanding the barriers to organizational reform, managing and changing culture, understanding governance structures for public and private schools and other organizations, and creating principles of equity, diversity, inclusivity, accountability as well as researching future educational visions.  

Syllabus: EDUC 374 

This course enables the educational leader to develop the ability to make informed decisions about appropriate technologies for school use, understand the importance and role of multimedia technologies for instructional support, administrative decision-making, and management of data in schools. It further helps the administrator to use computers and other technologies in the performance of their responsibilities, and to define, develop, and demonstrate standards of ethics for technology and the use of technology in the schools.

Syllabus:

The course examines the roles educators play in the moral education of students, and the formation of ethical school communities and agencies. Educational ethics invites educators to consider the roles, stakeholders, issues, and methods useful for applied ethics in the schools. Discussion focuses on major ethical theories and principles Students develop a method for making ethical decisions involving administration, faculty, and student life, while considering realistic ethical problems. The course includes investigations into controversial ethical issues and dilemmas to prepare educators to critically think through potential situations that may arise with students, parents, administrators, and peers. [3 units]

Syllabus:  

These three graduate courses form an integrated body of a two-year study and support of candidates who wish to obtain a “clear” induction administrative credential to work in California schools. These three courses are treated as one set of courses to introduce and develop students to gain competence in the concepts, skills and specific tools by which to effectively and pragmatically lead schools as organizations, with the primary focus on developing and demonstrating competence in each of the six California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). These courses must total at least 14 units. The individual nature of the course structure supports those in public standard schools, public charter schools, and private schools, both those with a religious focus and those that are public, secular (not religious) schools

These courses have been revised to meet the current California standards for school administrators. Based on prior state standards with some revisions by the state recently, these new standards primarily focus on the six California Professional Standards for Educational Leaders (CPSEL). Please see the required reading list for more detailed information about the CPSEL. 

Often course assignments are designed so that each student can use his/her own past, present or future school organization as the focus for the content of most assignments. Many assignments expect students to reflect and think about how to practically use their learning in these courses. 

The three courses have a sequence, but depending on individual needs, students may take the three courses out of the normal sequence, and for whatever amount of credits is appropriate to reflect the work and learning of the student, as determined collaboratively between the student and the student’s coach.

Syllabi: EDUC 400A, 400B, and 407

Financial Management is an introduction to resource allocation, management, and reporting in schools, churches and nonprofit institutions. The course focuses on the budget process, nonprofit and government accounting and finance, information technology, and property management. The course then considers school funding models, site planning, as well as reporting and other requirements. School business management is situated in the economics of the school enterprise, explores the role of innovation and entrepreneurship, and applies these concepts to the development of business models and plans. The course is generally concerned with: the macroeconomics of schools in society; resource allocation, funding, and reporting; the microeconomics of school planning and management; the budget process; financial statements; government funding, controls, and accounting standards; nonprofit accounting.

Syllabus: 

School leaders are constantly faced with pressing social justice issues that impact the school community and raise ethical and social dilemmas. It is imperative that future school leaders develop a foundation of knowledge that enables them to comprehensively respond to issues of social justice issues and social change. The course will address personal leadership styles, organizational leadership, and issues of social justice, educational equity, leading for change. In short, this course will explore how one’s leadership style impacts leading for change. The primary goal for this class is to explore yourself as a leader, to engage in dialogue, and motivate students to express their opinions on said issues. Students will be asked to examine their personal and professional commitment to ethics, diversity, social justice and human dignity. Students will leave this class having formed clear concepts of their leadership tendencies, with formed opinions on how the importance of equity and social justice are a fundamental part of a school climate and culture.

Syllabus: EDUC 429