Skip to main content

Department ofManagement & Entrepreneurship

Undergraduate Courses

All courses offered by the Management & Entrepreneurship Department are listed below.

 

Please note that, not all of the courses listed below are offered every quarter. To find out more information about current and future course offerings, please visit the management course availability page to see which courses are currently being offered. 

 

 

Lower Division Courses

A normative inquiry into the ethical issues that arise in business and how they should be managed. Attention is given to current moral issues in business, to ethical theories and their implications for these issues, and to the managerial implications. Topics may include truth in advertising, corporate social responsibility, affirmative action, government regulation of business, quality of work-life, environmental and resource issues, and ethical codes of conduct. Students who take PHIL 26 may not take this course for credit. (4 units)

Honors section. A normative inquiry into the ethical issues that arise in business and how they should be managed. Attention is given to current moral issues in business, to ethical theories and their implications for these issues, and to the managerial implications. Topics may include truth in advertising, corporate social responsibility, affirmative action, government regulation of business, quality of work-life, environmental and resource issues, and ethical codes of conduct. Students who take PHIL 26 may not take this course for credit. Prerequisite: Enrollment restricted to students in the University Honors or Leavey Scholars programs. (4 units)

This course examines the foundational knowledge required of individuals who seek to effectively manage organizations that meet the triple bottom line: social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Students will learn the concepts critical for understanding sustainability from biological, economic, and social perspectives. Students will learn how to justify the pursuit of sustainable business practices, illustrate the role of businesses in building a just and equitable future, and demonstrate how systems thinking helps to illustrate the interdependent nature of our world. (2 units)

The main focus of this course is to share the core skills found to be necessary for professionals who work to successfully advance sustainability in organizations and communities. Students will learn how to assess an organization’s sustainability practices and make appropriate strategy recommendations. Students will be able to illustrate the role of businesses in building a just and equitable future, as well as articulate how change agents can inspire action at multiple levels to build a more sustainable world. (2 units)

This course provides an opportunity for students to apply the theoretical skills they have learned in previous classes to a real-world organization, or “client”, and gain valuable business skills they can apply to future internships or full-time roles.  Students will learn foundational principles of sustainable business and explore the challenges of leadership to advance social and environmental objectives within the context of an actual business or organization. The course counts toward credit in the Design Thinking, Paradigm Shift and Sustainability pathways.  (4 units)

An examination of the basic conceptual vocabulary and theories regarding the economic, political, and social influences on international business today. Topics may include international trade, financial systems, political institutions, cultural factors, corporate structure, and market entry. Students who take this class may not receive credit for MGMT 80L taken in the Santa Clara London Program, or any equivalent course taken in a study abroad program. Prerequisites: BUSN 70 or 170, and ECON 3. (4 units)

Upper Division Courses

Introduction to organization theory and practice with an emphasis on organizational behavior, inclusive of the contexts of the individual, the group, and the organization as a whole. Prerequisite: Students must have completed 60 units. (5 units)

Introduction to organization theory and practice with an emphasis on organizational behavior, inclusive of the contexts of the individual, the group, and the organization as a whole. Prerequisites: Open only to students in the Leavey Scholars Program. Students must have completed 60 units. (5 units)

Focuses on the processes by which managers position their businesses or assets to maximize long-term profits in the face of uncertainty, rapid change, and competition. Covers various frameworks for analyzing an industry’s structure and a firm’s competitive position, and for developing a coherent, viable, and defensible firm strategy. Requires students to integrate and extend the knowledge and skills that they have developed throughout their coursework (i.e., marketing, finance, economics, organizational behavior, ethics, information systems, statistical analysis, operations management, accounting, etc.) into a “total” business perspective. Prerequisites: ECON 41 and 42 or OMIS 41; FNCE 121 or 121S; MGMT 80, 160, or 160S; MKTG 181 or 181S; and senior standing. (5 units)

Focuses on the processes by which managers position their businesses or assets to maximize long-term profits in the face of uncertainty, rapid change, and competition. Covers various frameworks for analyzing an industry’s structure and a firm’s competitive position and for developing a coherent, viable, and defensible firm strategy. Requires students to integrate and extend the knowledge and skills that they have developed throughout their coursework (i.e., marketing, finance, economics, organizational behavior, ethics, information systems, statistical analysis, operations management, accounting, etc.) into a “total” business perspective. Enrollment restricted to students in the Leavey Scholars Program. Prerequisites: ECON 41 and 42 or OMIS 41; FNCE 121 or 121S; MGMT 80, 160, or 160S; MKTG 181 or 181S; senior standing; and a minimum 3.5 cumulative GPA. (5 units)

The course looks at the practice of business innovation and entrepreneurship with an emphasis on how entrepreneurs identify opportunities, evaluate resources, build organizations, and understand the phenomena of entrepreneurship.  MGMT 164 is an introductory course intended to provide a foundation regarding the role of entrepreneurship, discussing ideas about entrepreneurship, and entrepreneurs in society and the economy. Prerequisites: ACTG 11 and MKTG 181. (5 units)

MGMT 165 integrates many of the concepts, tools and practices of entrepreneurship.  This course is a systematic and practical study of business creation and evaluation for new ventures and entrepreneurial projects.  Students will learn to assess and shape venture ideas, convert these ideas into viable businesses, and present these businesses to external stakeholders.  Topics include new venture execution plans, alternatives and trade-offs in financing, feasibility, resource acquisition, venture growth and harvesting.  The course includes discussion of cases, lectures, and presentations by guest lecturers who have played a role in starting new enterprises.  The course builds on foundation concepts from the Introductory Entrepreneurship course. It is designed for students seriously considering launching a new venture in a variety of contexts, and for students planning to work in an early stage venture. Prerequisite: MGMT 164. (5 units)

Comprehensive review of the role and functions of human resource management departments in business organizations, with particular emphasis on selection and placement, training and development, and compensation systems. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or 160S, or permission of instructor. (5 units)

This course provides insight into the thought processes of Venture Capitalists. It will cover all aspects of deal flow including sourcing opportunities, performing due diligence, determining valuation and constructing term sheets. While inspired as a way to prepare students for the Venture Capital Investment Competition (held in the Winter quarter), it offers an introduction to the VC world for students interested in becoming investors as well as those hoping to obtain VC funds as entrepreneurs. (2 units)

The impact of public policy on business and how businesses adapt to and influence public policies. Includes ideology, corporate social responsibility, government regulations, and business political activity. Lectures/discussions; case analyses. (5 units)

The international framework for trade and international investment, a critical discussion of the idea of globalization, the design and staffing of multinational organizational structures, and multinational strategies. Prerequisite: MGMT 80. MGMT 160 or 160S recommended. (5 units)

Interpersonal and small-group communication. Negotiating behavior. Oral and written communication. Integrates theory and skill-building through reading, case analysis, and practice. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or 160S, or permission of instructor. (5 units)

This course focuses on emerging models of enterprise at the interface of the public, private, and nonprofit sectors. It examines theories of change and the dynamics of social innovation and develops both conceptual and practical tools for creating high performance organizations that are capable of addressing seemingly intractable problems in a financially sustainable manner. Analysis of exemplary social business ventures, including alumni cases from the Global Social Benefit Incubator, will illustrate how the discipline of business planning can contribute the development of social ventures that are economically viable at scale. Students will apply this knowledge to the writing and analysis of a case on an actual social business. Prerequisite: Students must have completed 87.5 units. (5 units)

Exploration of relationship among food production, resource use, and the environment. Topics include biotechnology, the green revolution, resource depletion, environmental degradation, and food safety. Also listed as ECON 101. (5 units)

A conceptual framework for understanding leadership and opportunities for developing leadership skills. This interactive course requires personal reflection into leadership experiences. Prerequisite: Students must have completed 87.5 units. (5 units)

Issues include managerial and ownership succession, conflicts between family and nonfamily members, and conflicts between family and business cultures. Students will apply organizational behavior concepts to family business issues and develop a useful framework for analyzing and anticipating those issues. Class design incorporates cases, videos, and guest speakers. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or 160S. (5 units)

In this course, you will study the existing food system, issues of food access, justice and sovereignty as well as opportunities to use technology and innovation to create a more just and sustainable food system. We will examine how food policy and lobbying affect food production and consumption and the role of food policy in food insecurity, health risks tied to food, and climate change. The first third of the class focuses on agricultural production, food policy, and issues of access and affordability. The second third analyzes the role of food production in climate change, supply chains and opportunities for creating more sustainable, traceable and transparent supply chains. In the final third of the course, we will discuss opportunities for disruptive innovation in the agricultural technology and food technology fields as an agent of change. (5 units)

This course introduces students to the skills, practices, and processes for understanding and managing innovation and entrepreneurship activities that span cultures throughout the world. These cultural challenges include developing a deep understanding of the needs of customers in emerging markets, producing goods and services with global teams, and outsourcing manufacturing operations. (5 units)

More and more companies are adopting human rights policies, conducting human rights due diligence, reporting on their human rights performance, and employing teams of human rights experts. Through interactive exercises, debates, case studies, and role- play, this course will provide you with the knowledge, skills and tools to identify and address a company’ s human rights risks and to leverage the power of business to advance human rights around the world. (5 units)

Students will learn how to plan and manage a project. The course covers methods for creating a work breakdown structure and project schedule; estimating a project’s budget; and managing a project’s quality, schedule, and financial targets. Course activities include a project management computer simulation, and a directed team project that connects the students with a practicing project manager for applying the methods learned. Much of the course materials will be based on the Project Management Institute’s (PMI) Body of Knowledge, which is used for PMI certification. This course can be a first step toward certification. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or 160S, or permission of the instructor. (5 units)

We negotiate every day, at work, and in our personal lives. The overall goal of this course is to create a learning community where we can all improve our understanding of both the art and the science of negotiation. By learning about the research-based theories of negotiation, students will gain analytic skills in understanding negotiation principles. In preparing for the role plays assigned, students will practice selecting appropriate negotiation strategies for different contexts. By practicing negotiation in a number of different behavioral simulations, and reflecting critically on simulation outcomes, students will gain practical skills in influencing others to secure productive agreements through negotiation. Prerequisite: MGMT 160, may be taken concurrently with instructor permission. (5 units)

The foundation of Conscientious Capitalism is: “To lead others, I will first learn to lead myself.”  This course is designed to inspire and teach students about the role of Purpose, Virtue, Intentionality, Tenacity, and Accountability in their leadership journey. The course uses three distinct but related activities to achieve this goal. Nationally renowned business, military, and civic leaders share the experiences and challenges that shaped them, their careers, and major decisions. The goal of having iconic leaders share with honesty and vulnerability is to inspire students to do the same in this course and their lives. Harvard Business School cases give students the opportunity to learn from the most critical business and policy decisions of our times. Putting students in the role of decision-maker challenges them to understand the complexity of decision making and leadership, and begins to train them for their careers post SCU. Leadership Development Teams (LDTs) are small mentored groups. The goal is for students to explore and share their authentic selves and develop the courage to live as their authentic selves in their careers and lives. Note: Evidence of a student’s ambition to make an impact in his or her own life is  having the hunger and maturity to pursue the journey of self-awareness, authenticity, and courageous action. (5 units)

Offered occasionally to introduce new topics not covered by existing electives. Topics generally reflect the research interests of the faculty teaching the course. Prerequisite: MGMT 160 or 160S. (5 units)

Opportunity for selected upper-division students to work in local organizations. Prerequisites: MGMT 160 or 160S, and two courses from the following list: MGMT 166, 169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 177. Students must have completed 60 units and have the approval of the undergraduate committee one week prior to registration. (1–5 units)

This course brings together your academic studies with real-world start-up experience. As such, the class is comprised of two parts: an on-site internship, and an academic segment. The internship must be at least 10 hours per week, 80 for the quarter, starting by the first week of class. During the internship, you will help a Silicon Valley entrepreneurship develop and build a new venture. Here, you will observe a new venture during its formative years. The academic component entails the application of your business studies to a genuine new firm setting. You will examine and analyze your internship experiences with your academic learning. The ultimate product of this class is an in-depth case study of the firm and its founders. Prerequisites: MGMT 164 and must have a declared entrepreneurship minor. MGMT 165 may be taken concurrently. (5 units)

Independent projects undertaken by upper-division students with a faculty sponsor. Prerequisites: MGMT 160 or 160S, and a written proposal must be approved by instructor and chair one week prior to registration. (1–5 units)