Markkula Center for Applied Ethics

Brian Green

Brian Green

Director, Technology Ethics
408-554-7890
bpgreen@scu.edu

Brian Patrick Green is the director of technology ethics at the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics. His responsibilities include representing the Center at the Partnership on Artificial Intelligence to Benefit People and Society, speaking and publishing on AI ethics as well as various other topics in ethics and technology, and coordinating the Center’s partnership with The Tech Museum of Innovation in San Jose.  Green reviews and evaluates applications to the Center’s Hackworth grant program which awards funding to SCU faculty, staff, and students for work in applied ethics.  He also coordinates the Technology and Ethics Faculty Group, helps coach and coordinate the University’s Ethics Bowl team, works with the Center’s Environmental Ethics Fellows, and several other initiatives. In addition, Green teaches engineering ethics in the Graduate School of Engineering.

Green’s background includes doctoral and master's degrees in ethics and social theory from the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. His undergraduate degree is in genetics from the University of California, Davis, and he has conducted molecular biology research in both academic and industrial settings. Between college and graduate school, he served for two years in the Jesuit Volunteers International teaching high school in the Marshall Islands. His research interests include multiple topics in the ethics of technology, such as AI and ethics, the ethics of space exploration and use, the ethics of technological manipulation of humans, the ethics of mitigation of and adaptation towards risky emerging technologies, and various aspects of the impact of technology and engineering on human life and society, including the relationship of technology and religion (particularly the Catholic Church).

Many of his writings can be found at his academia.edu page.

Ethical Challenges in Stem

The Markkula Center for Applied Ethics is helping show how approaching problems with a conscience can spark innovation.