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Emails Exposed

Emails Exposed

Emails Exposed

**DISCLAIMER: All characters and scenarios in this post are fictional.**

Robert is on the baseball team at a small college in Texas. He’s a high profile player on the team, and as a result he has a lot of followers on Twitter and a large network on Facebook. For this reason, the members of the athletic board at his college think it’s necessary to monitor his social media accounts. In Texas, there is no law to prevent schools from requiring individuals to give up their personal social media login and password information, so Robert is forced to hand over his social media account information.
 
University officials say that the intent of monitoring is to identify potential compliance and behavioral issues early on, enabling athletic departments to educate athletes on how to present themselves online. They regularly check what Robert posts and flag certain postings they have issues with.
 
One day Robert tweets “Skipping class to break bad #schoolsucks #bettercallsaul #breakingbad.” Since Robert publicly admits to skipping class, school officials flag the post and decide to also start monitoring Robert’s email account without informing him.
 
Since the school provides an email account as a service to its students and faculty, it reserves the right to search its own system’s stored data. According to the college’s student handbook, administrators may access student email accounts in order to safeguard the system or “to ensure compliance with other University rules.” The policy does not mention whether or not account owners have to be notified that their emails are searched.
 
When searching Robert’s email account, university officials find several questionable emails between Robert and his tutor. It seems that Robert’s tutor has been sending him all answers to homework assignments and quizzes. As a result of the investigation, Robert is placed on athletic probation and his tutor is fired.
 
 
Should universities be allowed to monitor student email and social media accounts? If so, under what circumstances?
 
What crosses the line between campus safety and invasion of privacy?
 
Are university rules regarding email and social media monitoring too vague? If so, how can these rules be changed for more clarity?
 
Should Robert have been punished for cheating in class if he did not know his email was being monitored? What about his tutor?
 

RESOURCES

 
A Framework for Ethical Decision-Making
 
Universities might have to limit monitoring, set social media policies in stone under proposal
 
University Considers Monitoring Students' Emails For 'Negative Comments'  
 
Students Uncertain of Privacy Policy, Some Fear Searches
 
 
Photo by cmm08f available under a Creative Commons license.

 

Ethics
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