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Recent Awards

  • Linda Starr received $485,000 from Cal OES

    Linda Starr with the School of Law's Northern California Innocence Project has received a $485,000 subaward from Cal OES to support the "Postconviction DNA Testing Assistance Program".

  • Virginia Matzek received $150,871.80 from the Delta Stewardship Council

    Virginia Matzek with the Department of Environmental Studies and Sciences has received a $150,871.80 award from the Delta Stewardship Council to support her project "Integrating social and ecological research to control invasive species: solutions for fostering collective action among private and public stakeholders".

  • Deborah Moss-West received a total of $144,350 from The State Bar

    Deborah Moss-West with the Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center has received three separate grants totaling $144,350 from the State Bar Equal Access Fund to support the Law Center's work in providing free legal services for low-income people and to support the Consumer Debt Clinic which will provide free legal services at the Santa Clara County Superior Court Self-Help Center.

  • Nam Ling and Ying Liu received $154,673 from Kwai, Inc.

    Nam Ling and Ying Liu with the Computer Science and Engineering Department have received $154,673 from Kwai, Inc. to support their project entitled " Low Complexity and High Efficiency Image and Video Coding with Deep Learning on Heterogeneous Platforms".

  • Brian Bayless receives $407,661 from The National Institutes of Health

    Brian Bayless with the Biology Department has received a $407,661 grant from the National Institutes of Health. These funds will support his project entitled "Identification and functional analysis of A-tubule MIPs". The project is ongoing research to better understand how motile cilia structure affects its function. This grant will provide funds for reagents, equipment, student research, and research technician salary.

  • Chris Bacon receives $285,722 from The National Science Foundation

    Chris Bacon with the Environmental Studies and Sciences and Bill Sundstrom with the Economics Department have received a $285,722 grant from the National Science Foundation to support their project entitled " Household and institutional responses to security threats from environmental and economic disturbances". This project will build from the findings of Agropolis funded project focused on unpacking the relationships between farm and livelihood diversification, vulnerability, and resilience in a multi-hazard environment and shifting opportunity context, as well as the relationships between food and water security and landscape management as they examine findings influence of projected areas (including a recently declared one in a key case study area) on agrarian change and livelihoods, with special emphasis on farm management and access to food and water, in northern Nicaragua. They will also train a diverse group of undergraduate students in intercultural communication, STEM, and collaboration skills as well as build capacity with local partner organizations and students in Nicaragua.

  • Lindsay Halladay receives $411,000 from The National Institutes of Health

    Lindsay Halladay in the Psychology Department has received a $411,000 grant from the National Institutes of Health. These funds will support her project entitled "Cell-type and projection-specific dissection of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in the mediation of social behavioral deficits induced by early life adversity". Funding will support salary/wages and experiments to identify neural circuitry underlying stress-induced social behavioral deficits. This includes student, technician, and PI salaries, as well as equipment and supplies necessary to carry out proposed experiments stress-induced social behavioral deficits.

  • Kurt Schab receives $20,000 from University of Oklahoma

    Kurt Schab with the Electrical & Computer Engineering Department has received a $20,000 sub-award from the University of Oklahoma. These funds will support his project entitled "Modeling and design techniques for time-varying antenna systems". Kurt will be providing technical expertise on electromagnetic theory and modeling methods.

  • Emre Araci receives $518,406 from The National Science Foundation

    Emre Araci with the Bioengineering Department has received a CAREER award of $518,406 from the National Science Foundation. This award will support his project entitled "Human motion driven capillaric circuits for skin-mountable biosensors". The project will involve the development of capillaric wearable sensors for human motion analysis.

  • Betty Young receives $13,587 from Stanford University, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

    Betty Young with the Physics Department has received a $13,587 grant from Stanford University. These funds will support her project "SuperCDMS SNOLAB". This funding will support a post-bac physics major work on the SuperCDMS SNOLAB experiment with SCU PI Young. The work will focus on mechanical assembly and testing of parts for the SuperCDMS SNOLAB Detector Towers, updates to etraveler and Confluence, developing assembly and test procedures, etc.. The period of performance covers a critical time for SuperCDMS as we prepare detector towers for SNOLAB.

  • Fr. Joe Mueller receives $50,000 from Lilly Endowment Inc.

    Fr. Joe Mueller, Dean of Jesuit School of Theology, has received a $50,000 award from the Lilly Endowment Inc. to support his project "Pathways for Tomorrow Initiative". This project is a planning grant to support the development of pastors, leaders, and theologians, primarily from the Latinx community — this involves faculty development, course development, and faculty hiring.

  • Naomi Levy receives $600,404 from University of California, Berkeley

    Naomi Levy with the Political Science Department has received a $600,404 sub-award from the University of California, Berkeley to support her project entitled "California 100: Everyday Indicators for Policy Innovation". The project will involve Sourcing everyday indicators of safety

  • Justen Whittall receives $75,929 from Santa Clara Valley Habitat Agency

    Justen Whittall with the Biology Department has received a $75,929 award from Santa Clara Valley Habitat Agency to support his project entitled "Name That Jewelflower". The goal of the project is to determine the morphological and genetic differences between two rare plants in southern Santa Clara County.

  • Colleen Chien receives $279,253 from The New Venture Fund

    Colleen Chien with the School of Law has received a $279,253 award from New Venture Fund. These funds will support her project "CSI Second Chances and Empathy". This project will support Clean Slate Legislation through Gap Sizing Reports and Empathy Hackathons.

  • Elsa Chen receives $441,093 from The New Venture Fund

    Elsa Chen with the Political Science Department has received a $441,093 grant from New Venture Fund. These funds will support her project " The Impact of Automated Record Clearance on Individuals, Families, and Communities: A Qualitative Inquiry". As Clean Slate legislation is adopted and implemented in some states, empirical evidence of its positive effects can encourage adoption in additional jurisdictions. Furthermore, a clear understanding of shortcomings or barriers that limit the effectiveness of automated record clearance can guide improvements to policies and processes to better improve quality of life for individuals whose records have been cleared, and better enhance public safety and economic vitality in their communities. To determine the individual effects of record clearance via clean slate reforms, the research team will interview 200 people with expugnable or expunged criminal records from four states (50 interviews per state). Follow-up interviews will be conducted with 100 respondents to determine if additional benefits are actualized over time. To examine the impact of clean slate reforms on communities and society, the research team will interview 40 representatives from community and local/state government agencies (ten per state) in California, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Utah. The primary investigative strategy will be semi-structured interviews. We expect to produce three categories of deliverables: (1) Policy briefs summarizing best practices in the design and implementation of record clearance legislation, (2) Educational materials such as handouts and infographics to share with community organizations and partners for their websites and social media, and (3) Traditional academic outputs, including peer-reviewed articles and conference presentations.

  • Anna Sampaio receives $14,975 from Rutgers University

    Anna Sampaio with the Ethnic Studies Department has received a $14,975 award from Rutgers Eagleton Institute of Politics. This award will fund her "Mujeres, Movidas, y Movimiento: Comparative Study of Latina Candidate Emergence and Political Mobilization in California and Texas" project. This research will examine the emergence of Latina candidates for national office in 2018 and 2020, looking specifically at how the experiences of Latina Congressional candidates in California and Texas compared with each other and drawing lessons about these states for Latinas running for national office across the country. Focusing specifically on Latina Congressional candidates in both California and Texas, the research will utilize feminist ethnography to collect interviews and observational data from Latina congressional candidates.

  • Brody Sandel receives $627,832 from The National Science Foundation

    Brody Sandel with the Biology Department has received a CAREER grant of $627,832 from the National Science Foundation. These funds support his project entitled "Global change and the functional ecology of grasses". The research consists of a set of projects about grass distribution, function and their influence on ecosystems. These projects will involve fieldwork in the western US, visits to international collaborators and ecoinformatic work.

  • Katie Wilson receives $61,553 from The National Science Foundation

    Katie Wilson with the Electrical Engineering Department has received a $61,553 grant from NSF. These funds will support her project "NeTS-VO: A Virtual Organization for the NeTS Community". The project is to establish and maintain a virtual office for Wireless Researchers working with and interested in working with the NSF Networking Technology and Systems (NeTs) program. The project (unsolicited) proposes to establish a "one-stop-shop" website and Slack-channel for researchers to see the latest proposals, papers, and ideas within NeTs.

  • Deborah Moss-West receives three grants totaling $103,378 from The State Bar of California

    Deborah Moss-West with the Law School's Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center has received three separate grants from the State Bar of California. The three awards will support the following projects: IOLTA funds in the amount of $23,530 will enable the Law Center to continue to provide free legal services to the low-income community with immigration, consumer law and workers' rights matters. Equal Access Funds in the amount of $20,980 allows the Law Center to provide free legal services to the low-income community with consumer law, immigration, and workers' rights matters. State Bar Partnership funds of $58,868 will support the Consumer Debt Clinic which will provide free legal services at the Santa Clara County Superior Court Self-Help Center.